African American Educational Issues
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Black History Every Day

Black History Every Day | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
Daily birthdates and events in black history. The ones tagged #TodayInBlackHistory link to original sources with more information.

 

http://pinterest.com/rexi44/black-history-every-day/


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Birmingham Church Bombing Families Split Over Honor

Birmingham Church Bombing Families Split Over Honor | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -- Relatives of four black girls killed when Ku Klux Klan members bombed an Alabama church are split over how to mark the crime 50 years later, with some favoring a congressional medal honoring the victims and others seeking...

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Letter: Break cycle of poverty by educating parents - Buffalo News

Letter: Break cycle of poverty by educating parents - Buffalo News | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
Letter: Break cycle of poverty by educating parents Buffalo News I do agree with Rod Watson's assumption in his April 11 column, “Buffalo risks wallowing in its sad labels,” that poverty and segregation are synonymous in that economic status often...
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Teaching the last backpack generation

Teaching the last backpack generation | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
This is the last generation of students who will carry backpacks to school. For teachers and parents, the realization that education will look very diff

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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, March 19, 2013 4:06 PM

The name says it all...

Education is changing.  BUt solid principals of teaching and engagement are timeless. It's all about relationship.

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Character Education Seen as Student-Achievement Tool

Character Education Seen as Student-Achievement Tool | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
Character education is on the upswing as research points to its effectiveness and policymakers seek ways to curb improper behavior.

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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, March 1, 2013 12:09 PM

I wonder if theyir model has PBIS components. It would be interesting to see what models were used in the research quoted by the department of ed.

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Restorative justice: One high school's path to reducing suspensions by half

Restorative justice: One high school's path to reducing suspensions by half | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
In one tough high school in Oakland, Calif., a restorative justice program has cut suspensions in half in just a year.

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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, April 1, 2013 9:23 PM

This is not really new- but it just needs to be used with fidelity.

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Human American - A conversation between Lincoln and Washington on 'race'

A conversation about race relations in America...

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School Choice Discrimination Leaves No Choice for Vulnerable Youth of Color

School Choice Discrimination Leaves No Choice for Vulnerable Youth of Color | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it

The term school choice is commonly used by corporate education reformers as a grotesque misnomer to disguise their attempted end-run around the U.S. Supreme Court’s seminal recognition in Brown v. Board of Education (1954) of the constitutional right of all children to equal educational opportunity, based upon the absolute rejection of the “separate but equal” concept of segregated public education.

School choice programs encourage privatized outsourcing of public education that increases academic segregation based on race, disability, language and poverty that undermines the concept of equal educational opportunity.


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Baltimore: Anatomy of an American City

Baltimore: Anatomy of an American City | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
Fault Lines investigates the dynamics of race, poverty and incarceration in a US election year. (Excellent journalism here!
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Teaching Race and Poverty in the wake of "If I Was A Poor Black Kid"

Teaching Race and Poverty in the wake of "If I Was A Poor Black Kid" | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it

Let me explain: this particular article has created a firestorm of controversy online.  All of the debated points center on how we think about race and  poverty in the USA.  I'm most certainly not endorsing this article as a 'stand-alone' source of information, but rather a jumping off point to discuss some difficult questions that, fundamentally are geographic in nature.   This is a difficult subject, so sometimes we feel more comfortable just ignoring the topic...I feel that is a disservice to our students.   

 

Personally, what I want my students to understand and get out of this is two-fold: the advice that Gene Marks makes to individuals to pursue educational opportunities to improve their situation is excellent and sound.  The problem lies in that this individual advice is being proposed as a societal remedy for larger, structural problems.  In essence it is a problem of scale.  What is good advice for the individual with not cure all the ails of systemic problems that go far beyond needs education.  What do you want your students to get out of this debate/discussion?     

Some sample rebuttal articles:

http://www.dominionofnewyork.com/2011/12/13/if-i-were-the-middle-class-white-guy-gene-marks/#.TuodE3qwXh_

 

 

http://www.good.is/post/an-ode-to-a-poor-black-kid-i-never-knew-how-forbes-gets-it-wrong/

And a snippet of a more scholarly piece "Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria:"

http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~jdowd/tatum-blackkids.pdf


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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:36 AM

Gene Marks probably should have chosen a different topic to write about, or at least one that could be deemed less offensive.  He does have sound advice for those "poor black kids," but only those living in a perfect world can follow his advice fully.  It's easy to say you are going to be the most perfect student you can be, but if you live in an environment where parental supervision is low, a goal such as that is harder to achieve.  Parents in these areas do not stress it enough that being a top notch student is a necessity.  This is not a one dimensional issue. 

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Cognitive vs non-cognitive skills

University of Maryland economist Sergio Urzua says non-cognitive skills are as important as cognitive skills in employment trends, government policy, and hum...

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Jem Muldoon's curator insight, March 2, 2013 10:42 AM

Great video! 

"University of Maryland economist Sergio Urzua says non-cognitive skills are as important as cognitive skills in employment trends, government policy, and human behavior.
Urzua says economists have typically focused on cognitive skills (such as intelligence, literacy, mathematical abilities) in analyzing employment trends. Recently, however, economists have started to look at non-cognitive "soft" skills (like self esteem, motivation, sympathy).
Economists have developed a lot of evidence showing the impact of cognitive skills on labor market outcomes, wages, occupation, and employment, but they didn't really know the importance of these socio-emotional skills."
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Graphic: School-to-Prison Pipeline | Suspension Stories

Graphic: School-to-Prison Pipeline | Suspension Stories | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
Suspension Stories - Challenging the School to Prison Pipeline

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Miriam Scurrah's curator insight, September 17, 2013 10:19 PM

Too many Tasmanian children are suspended or expelled from school - it's a very lazy way of dealing with issues. We need greater resources in our schools to help these kids - more support for families and teachers and the school community. These children need to be included and not excluded - or the cost to society just increases dramatically both in terms of financial and social costs. 

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Teens turn lens on 'shocking' poverty

Teens turn lens on 'shocking' poverty | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
By Lou Dubois, NBC News What a difference 20 miles makes. In Detroit, the median household income is $27,862, and 57 percent of the children live below the poverty line.
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6 Civil War Myths Everyone Believes (That Are Total B.S.)

6 Civil War Myths Everyone Believes (That Are Total B.S.) | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
We might be going out on a limb here, but we're guessing that most of our readers aren't hardcore Civil War historians.

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Educational Leadership:The Principalship:How High-Poverty Schools Are Getting It Done

Educational Leadership:The Principalship:How High-Poverty Schools Are Getting It Done | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.
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New Model: Comprehension and Operations Learners

New Model:  Comprehension and Operations Learners | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, March 17, 2013 2:02 PM
With collaboration, people quickly sort themselves into one of these two groups:   ›Comprehension learners - students draw a quick mental sketch of the material to be grasped, using analogies, metaphors, and ties to personal experience, and then fill in and alter that framework as they acquire more and more detailed information››Operations learners - students build up a framework piece by piece only as they acquire knowledge of the details (Rhem, 1995) It can be very challenging when groups created include both types of thinkers/learners.  Where do you start?! Thank you @drrevdean for pushing thinking again!  
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The Landscape of Learning: This could quite possibly be the most important thing that we teach our students

The Landscape of Learning: This could quite possibly be the most important thing that we teach our students | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it

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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, March 15, 2013 8:41 AM

M Scott Peck starts out The Road Less Traveled with the phrase "Life is hard."   Perseverance is so important in our world.  We have to make sure kids are exposed to long-term problems where there are not easy solutions. By teaching them how to break things down and eventually achieve success (and delaying gratification), they will develop the grit needed in life.

Mary Perfitt-Nelson's comment, March 16, 2013 12:06 PM
The Road Less Traveled is one of my essential go-to books from the past!
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Questions and Answers: Determining What Our Students Really Need

Questions and Answers: Determining What Our Students Really Need | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
This morning I sat in two inner city middle school classrooms in Indianapolis as I do most weeks. But something struck me deeply in the center of my chest as I was observing the boredom and apathy i

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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, February 21, 2013 3:13 PM

Getting to know a kid and tell about themselves.  Nothing new- just forgotten.

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Black: the color of language

“Somebody told a lie one day. They couched it in language. They made everything black ugly and evil. Look in your dictionary and see the synonyms for the word black. It’s always something degrading, low, and sinister. Look at the word white. It’s always something pure, high, and clean. Well I wanna get the language right, tonight.” This is from Martin Luther King, Jr. It is rarely quoted, but it is a powerful statement about the use of language in race and race relations. It’s about how all of these different variables work together to create a divide and ranking system between two of America’s most discussed “races:” Blacks and Whites.


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The Bottom Line with Jessica English - Race Relations in America

The Bottom Line with Jessica English - Race Relations in America | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it

Archived Show from April 1, 2012 [LISTEN NOW]


by JESSICA ENGLISH, Coffee Party USA

 

Let’s get to The Bottom Line on race, poverty, and healthcare in America. I grew up in the neighborly Sesame St. generation, but having lived all over this country, I know everyone has an opinion or an experience related to race... some with which I do not agree or appreciate.

 

Race and socioeconomics certainly affect and shape our public policy. Have you read Dead On Arrival? It is an interesting history of the “politics of health care in
twentieth-century America,” written by Colin Gordon. The book was assigned reading for my college history course, and I had the pleasure of reading it, while passionately rallying for single payer health care legislation, as it was killed in
Congress in December of ‘09. I think many people would be appalled to learn how much racism and bigotry played into the creation of healthcare/insurance system we have in America.

 

So let’s have a big, civil discussion and find out what this country is getting right when it comes to race and public policy, where we are dead wrong, and what we want for the next generation. The Bottom Line: How do we get there… to that place Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr dreamt about?

 

The Bottom Line with Jessica English airs live every Sunday from 5 pm to 6:30 pm ET (2 pm to 3:30 pm PT).

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Bill Gates: Poverty not excuse for no education

Bill Gates: Poverty not excuse for no education | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
BOSTON (AP) — Microsoft founder Bill Gates told the National Urban League on Thursday that a child's success should not depend on the race or income of parents and that poverty cannot be an excuse for a poor education.

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Jay-Z Subject of Georgetown University Course

Author and educator Michael Eric Dyson is decoding the rhymes of rapper Jay-Z to teach students at Georgetown University about race, gender and poverty. But ...

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Heckman’s research shows non-cognitive skills promote achievement

Heckman’s research shows non-cognitive skills promote achievement | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it

Importance of non-cognitive skills in achievement. How can we cultivate persistence, reliability and self-discipline in our students? It's not just about content and knowledge...social skills and motivation make a long term impact, and can be firhter developed in adolescence...


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First-Rate Temperaments | Washington Monthly

First-Rate Temperaments | Washington Monthly | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it

From the website

"Liberals don’t want to admit it, and conservatives don’t want to pay for it, but building character—resilience, optimism, perseverance, focus—may be the best way to help poor students succeed."

 

Book review by Thomas Toch

Summary by PEN Weekly Newsblast

 

"In a review in The Washington Monthly of Paul Tough's How Children Succeed, Thomas Toch writes that Tough addresses a new body of neuroscientific and psychological research suggesting the most severe consequences of poverty on learning are psychological and behavioral rather than cognitive -- in some ways refuting his earlier work on the Harlem Children's Zone and the intersection of poverty and education. Tough presents research from neuroendocrinology and other fields that finds childhood psychological traumas -- from physical and sexual abuse to physical and emotional neglect, divorce, parental incarceration, and addiction -- overwhelm the ability of developing bodies and minds ability to manage stress, blocking capacity to learn, for example, the alphabet. The good news, Tough reports, is that studies reveal nurturing relationships with parents or other caregivers engenders resilience in children that insulates them from some of the worst effects of a harsh environment. Tough also contends that research shows resilience, optimism, perseverance, focus, and other non-cognitive skills can be taught, practiced, learned, and improved, even into adulthood. These traits go a long way toward refuting cognitive determinists who claim success is a function of IQ. This research also undercuts claims by Klein, Rhee, et alia that we can lead impoverished students to success through higher standards, stronger teachers, and other academic reforms alone."


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Humanizing Schools: Breaking Down the School-to-Prison Pipeline - Huffington Post (blog)

Humanizing Schools: Breaking Down the School-to-Prison Pipeline - Huffington Post (blog) | African American Educational Issues | Scoop.it
Humanizing Schools: Breaking Down the School-to-Prison Pipeline
Huffington Post (blog)
If we are to stem the deleterious impacts of the school-to-prison pipeline within communities of color, the first step is to humanize our schools.

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