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Maasai warrior Sabore Ole Oyie shares tales of Kenya while raising money for ... - InMenlo

Maasai warrior Sabore Ole Oyie shares tales of Kenya while raising money for ... - InMenlo | Africa | Scoop.it
InMenlo
Maasai warrior Sabore Ole Oyie shares tales of Kenya while raising money for ...
InMenlo
That he stands out walking along Middle Avenue in Menlo Park, Sabore Ole Oyie does not dispute — and it's not just because he's tall.
Peter Bryan's insight:

    This article is about a Maasai warrior. Sabore Ole Oyie is a Maasai warrior who has traveled to the US several times. While he is there, he talks to school children, about what it is like to become a Maasai warrior. He is also trying to raise money to build 400 wells for the Ewaso Nyiro region of Kenya. He is wanting to build wells because they provide clean water, and also allow girls who would usually spend time getting water, to go to school. He has currently raised $80,000, with each well costing around $25,000 to make. Education has always been an important thing in Sabore's life, and he is a high school graduate. When he is talking to school children, he tells them about the three stages of life for the Maasai men, childhood, warrior, and elder. 

    This article is very useful in helping my understanding of Africa. It shows me that not only are the governments and NGOs in countries in Africa trying to help, but so are some of the people. It also shows me that while it is common for girls to not get education in the Ewaso Nyiro region of Kenya, some people are trying to stop that, and give girls equal opportunities to boys. 

    I think that the topic discussed in this article is very interesting. I find it interesting that Sabore has traveled to America several times to help raise money for wells, and educate children. I also like that Sabore has realized the need for clean water, and instead of just thinking about it, he is actually acting on it. I find him a inspirational person, and think that other people should see him as an example.

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Tinariwen: The desert spirit is all we know - Metro

Tinariwen: The desert spirit is all we know - Metro | Africa | Scoop.it
Metro
Tinariwen: The desert spirit is all we know
Metro
He's dressed in jeans and a casual sweatshirt, rather than the traditional Tuareg turban/veil and robes he and his blues outfit perform in, representing their Saharan nomad heritage.
Peter Bryan's insight:

This article is an interview of the lead singer of the band Tinariwen, Ag Alhousseyni. The band Tinariwen is made up of entirely of Tuareg people. Ag talks about how everyone in the band gets inspiration from deserts, as they all grew up in the Sahara.  Ag says that it is sometimes hard for the group to write songs that other people can relate to, so they have to try and be quite simple. However, when Tinariwen are performing, they don't usually seem that simple, as they often have eight band members on stage, all playing different instruments. While all the members are Tuareg, they all have very different backgrounds. Ag Alhousseyni for example grew up in Algeria, however, Ag Alhabib joined the Tuareg rebel movement and received military training in Libya. After a military coup, it was against the law to play music where they lived, so it was hard for them to practice for a while. Ag Alhousseyni says that it is sometimes hard to be a successful musician when people know you also for your political views. However, he doesn't care too much about becoming popular, he just wants to be apart of something that his people can be proud of.

    This article helped me to understand Africa in some useful ways. Firstly, I found out that it is against Islamic law to play music. It also helped me to understand that Tuaregs don't all live in the desert their whole lives, some do other things. 

    I think it is very interesting that there is a band completely made up of Tuaregs. I think it very interesting that even though they come from a place where music is banned, they still have learn't how to play instruments. Overall, this article was very interesting, and insightful.

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Uganda Child Soldier On His Struggle To Heal - Sky News

Uganda Child Soldier On His Struggle To Heal - Sky News | Africa | Scoop.it
Uganda Child Soldier On His Struggle To Heal
Sky News
Norman Okello describes the "aggression, rage and frustration" he experienced after being forced to become a child soldier. 11:12am UK, Thursday 13 February 2014.
Peter Bryan's insight:

    This article and video talk about what it happened when you where taken by the LRA as a child in Uganda. It focuses on a man called Norman Okello. It talks about how when he was twelve he was abducted by the LRA, and then forced to do horrible things. It also talks about how these memories still haunt him to this day, but he is learning to forgive himself. In the video, Norman talks about how after he escaped the LRA he was not welcomed back into his community that quickly. When he first came back, people saw him as a rebel, and where afraid of him. Now however, he is living a normal life in a village with his family.

    This article helps me understand Africa in several ways. Firstly, it shows me that people really are abducted by rebel groups, and turned into child soldiers. It also showed me that some places have a horrible history, and that devastating things had happened there. Another way it helped me to understand Africa was that it showed me that there was, and in some places still is, a danger to children.

    I think that the topic discussed in this article is a very interesting one. It is a topic that is important for people to know about, so that they can help people who have been traumatized by child soldier experiences. It is also important as it shows that people can get over their terrifying experiences as children. I also think that the topic is very interesting as I am intrigued by the way different people think, and this article and video gives an insight to the thinking of a child soldier. 

 

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Children and chocolate: The sweet industry's bitter side - ConfectioneryNews.com

Children and chocolate: The sweet industry's bitter side - ConfectioneryNews.com | Africa | Scoop.it
ConfectioneryNews.com Children and chocolate: The sweet industry's bitter side ConfectioneryNews.com Discussing the case, the non-profit development organization, Suedwind Institute, told ConfectioneryNews that it believed all companies who used...
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One Million Children Labor in Africa's Goldmines - PBS NewsHour

One Million Children Labor in Africa's Goldmines - PBS NewsHour | Africa | Scoop.it
PBS NewsHour
One Million Children Labor in Africa's Goldmines
PBS NewsHour
The U.S.

Via ayesha waqar
Peter Bryan's insight:

In this article the author explains how in many goldmines in Africa, child labor is used. It also talks about the possible negative health affects, and that the children only get payed around $2 a day. The author admits that the governments in the countries where this happens are trying to stop it, but not enough is being done. Some of the reasons that mining is so dangerous for children is that it can cause lots of illnesses, and also physically damage the body. This article helps me to understand Africa by showing me that while gold mining, which can be good, is happening in Africa, it is happening in an illegal manner. This shows that there are some problems that need to be sorted out. I think that this topic is a very important one, and that more effort should be put into stopping what is happening. I think that child labor is a very serious issue, that happens far too often, and it is good that awareness is being brought to it. Overall, I think that the article was very informing, and good at telling all the necessary details.

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Nigeria: More than 600 killed in the last two months | Amnesty ...

Nigeria: More than 600 killed in the last two months | Amnesty ... | Africa | Scoop.it
Amnesty International is alarmed by the increase in attacks by unknown gunmen on people in north-east Nigeria and called on the government to take effective measures to protect the people and prevent further human rights ...
Peter Bryan's insight:

This article talks about how Amnesty International is worried by increased attacks by gunmen in north-east Nigeria. Quite a recent attack happened in Adamawa State. In the attack, 40 people were killed. Since the beginning of 2014, more than 600 people have been killed in attacks in Nigeria. The article states that the authorities aren't trying hard enough to prevent the attacks, and should do more about the situation. In another attack, this time in Yobe state, a college was attacked. 29 people died straight away from the attack, and several others died while in hospital. Eye witnesses talked about how gunmen arrived at the college, then they started shooting people, and burning down nearby buildings. Amnesty International want the Nigerian government to provide better protection for schools and colleges, and also to properly investigate all the shootings. 

 

This article helped me to understand Africa very well. Firstly, it showed me that even in countries that don't have civil war, there can still be a lot of killing. Also, I am teaching about Nigeria, so this has helped me by showing that there are some serious hardships in certain places there.

 

I think that the Nigerian government should do something serious about this problem. I like the fact that Amnesty International are trying to get the government more heavily involved in the prevention and investigation of these crimes. I also think it is important that this problem is made well known, so that there can be more people trying to help stop it. 

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2014 kicks off with two LRA escapees in CAR | Invisible Children

2014 kicks off with two LRA escapees in CAR | Invisible Children | Africa | Scoop.it
Last week two individuals independently defected from Joseph Kony s Lord s Resistance Army (LRA) in the Central African Republic.
Peter Bryan's insight:

    In early January of 2014, two people managed to escape the LRA in the Central African Republic. On January 6th, a mother of 2 children came out of the bush near her home town. She was around 15 at the time she was abducted, and is thought to be about 18 now. She has now returned safely home. Later that week, a 38 year old man surrendered on the bank of the Ngouangoua river. He had been in the LRA for 20 years, and has now been handed over to the Ugandan army. 

    This article helps me understand Africa in a few ways. Firstly, it shows me that people do try to escape the rebel groups they are captured by, and some actually succeed. It also shows me that people are willing to take in even those who have been in the LRA.

    I think that it is very important that people escape the LRA. I think that the article does a very good job of informing you that people can escape from the LRA. I also think that through the topic of the article, more people could find ways to help people escape from the LRA.

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Delegates bask in luxury as child soldiers fight - BDlive

Delegates bask in luxury as child soldiers fight - BDlive | Africa | Scoop.it
Independent Online
Delegates bask in luxury as child soldiers fight
BDlive
There have been reports of unspeakable brutality, including the forced recruitment of child soldiers, massacres and gang rapes.
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South Africa: Education in South Africa: Where Did It Go Wrong? - AllAfrica.com

South Africa: Education in South Africa: Where Did It Go Wrong? - AllAfrica.com | Africa | Scoop.it
South Africa: Education in South Africa: Where Did It Go Wrong?

Via SocioLingo Africa
Peter Bryan's insight:

    This article focuses on how education in South Africa is not at a very high standard. Many children are getting very low grades, or dropping out of school early. It talks about some of the many causes in this article. One cause is that teachers don't always teach in their lessons, and there is no one monitoring them to stop them from going completely off topic. One of the reasons that teachers are often very bad is that they lack the education needed to teach. A second reason for the poor education and many dropouts is that there are lots of outside distractions. A large problem is teen pregnancy, which causes girls to need to leave school. Another problem is that many of the students parents in South Africa lack a simple education, so they are unable to help and support their children as well as people with better educations can. 

    This article helps me understand Africa in a very useful way. It helped because, in class we learnt about how in some countries in Africa people focus on education a lot. However, this article helps to show that education is not as important as it is in other countries. Also, it helped me see that even in quite developed African countries, there are still education problems.

    I think that the topic in the article is a very important one. I believe that everyone should have access to a decent education, and this is not what is happening in South Africa. I think that the government should look into the education of the children of South Africa, to make it better, and give children a fairer chance at life. 

 

 

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Rebecca!Morgan Geography's curator insight, April 10, 2014 12:49 PM

This article explains the flaws of education in South Africa, putting it in the Intellectual category. Children drop out of the meager schools, and there is very little order of system for teachers to follow. Instead they discuss topics sometimes unrelated to education - the schools  are not monitored and very few students pass.

-Morgan

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West Africa and the War on Drugs: South American mistakes ...

West Africa and the War on Drugs: South American mistakes ... | Africa | Scoop.it
In South America, the war on drugs has failed, judging by the trail of dead bodies and countries destabilised by the drug syndicate wars, against each other and against the police. Yet, as drug smugglers expand their horizons, ...
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