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MGP Sam Childers Water drilling in South Sudan

MGP Sam Childers on water drilling in South Sudan (Mi è piaciuto un video di @YouTube da @KevinGEvans: http://t.co/BDrYsVkJ MGP Sam Childers Water drilling in South Sudan)...

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Timothy Brinkley's curator insight, January 27, 2013 11:14 AM

Sam Childers is the man Machine Gun Preacher movie was about.  He also wrote a book, Another Man's War.

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Exchanging Daughters for Livestock: Child Marriage In South Sudan | Human Rights Watch

Exchanging Daughters for Livestock: Child Marriage In South Sudan | Human Rights Watch | Africa | Scoop.it
JUBA — “You will marry this old man whether you like it or not,” Aguet’s uncles told her. Aguet, from South Sudan, was forced at age 15 to marry a 75-year-old man. Her family received 80 cows as dowry in exchange.

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Timothy Brinkley's curator insight, March 19, 2013 4:13 AM

For primary and secondary aged school children, a marriage that young may ruin their chances of ever completing their education.

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Small-scale agriculture holds big promise for Africa

Small-scale agriculture holds big promise for Africa | Africa | Scoop.it

The recent discovery of a large aquifer in Kenya is a reminder that far from being dry, Africa has abundant water resources. The problem for farmers is access: only around 6% of cultivated land is equipped for irrigation, leaving millions dependent on rain-fed agriculture. How might more of them be helped to access water that could raise their productivity?

 

Large-scale, government-funded irrigation systems have long attempted to address this, with varying degrees of success. Those systems have a place, but research by the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) has found that many smallholders are themselves taking the lead and investing in their own low-cost, small-scale irrigation systems...

 

...The challenge in sub-Saharan Africa is that farmer-driven investment in small-scale irrigation is spreading without much governmental support in creating an enabling environment where farmers have information on the various systems, financial services to help them invest, and market access to sell produce...

 

...Motorised pumps, for example, are also becoming popular but are usually imported, which can make them expensive and present practical challenges if the instructions come in languages not understood by users, or if spare parts are difficult to find. Simply providing translated instructions is one way of providing support.


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1/3 of the world's food is wasted – how can we stop the rot?

1/3 of the world's food is wasted – how can we stop the rot? | Africa | Scoop.it

Around a third of all the food produced in the world ends up being wasted somewhere along the production and consumption line, according to the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation. In the UK, 50% of food waste occurs in the home: we throw away 7.2m tonnes of food and drink every year. That means the average household is putting £480 in the bin, rising to £680 for families with children. The rest of the waste takes place back up the supply chain, mostly on farms, but also during transport and in stores.

 

The consequences of all this waste go far beyond the burden on individual wallets – the land, water, fertilisers and labour that go into producing the food are also wasted, and we are left with the greenhouse-gas emissions from landfill and transport....

 

...Developing and developed countries account roughly evenly for the 1.3 billion tonnes of global food waste each year – but the nature of that wastage is very different. In developed countries, food is wasted throughout the supply chain, including at the consumption stage: the average European and North American consumer wastes 95-115kg of food a year. In sub-Saharan Africa and south/south-east Asia, very little is wasted by consumers. Here, most waste occurs early in the production chain, affecting millions of smallholders. Poor harvesting techniques, and a lack of storage and transport infrastructure, cause significant losses, reducing income and exacerbating local food insecurity.


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'Lost Boy of Sudan' Gabriel Bol Deng returns to Lenox school to share his life ... - Berkshire Eagle

'Lost Boy of Sudan' Gabriel Bol Deng returns to Lenox school to share his life ... - Berkshire Eagle | Africa | Scoop.it

'Lost Boy of Sudan' Gabriel Bol Deng returns to Lenox school to share his life ...


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Timothy Brinkley's curator insight, April 14, 2013 2:55 AM
I like it that Gabriel is sensitive to the girls' situation. It is hard to change the culture, but easy to drill wells at the school.
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A new country rises from the ruins

A new country rises from the ruins | Africa | Scoop.it

 The country is bigger than France but has almost no infrastructure. Less than 1% of the people have access to electricity. “This place makes Afghanistan look developed,” says one of thousands of foreign helpers.


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Timothy Brinkley's curator insight, May 6, 2013 2:03 AM

This is an excellent article summarizing the current state of South Sudan.  It covers education, health care, security, business, infrastructure, among others.

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How Rwandan shops and Congolese farms bump up agriculture output

How Rwandan shops and Congolese farms bump up agriculture output | Africa | Scoop.it

For the past two years, agricultural production has been increasing in the province of South Kivu in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. And at least part of the credit goes to shopkeepers across the border in Rwanda.

 

The neighboring store owners have been providing Congolese farmers with phytosanitary seeds and products that help avert crop diseases. Then, these same shopkeepers have been buying the harvest that ends up coming back on the markets of Bukavu in the form of flour and other products, which have seen a resulting drop in prices.

 

It is a virtuous circle, where the Rwandese shopkeepers are convinced that in this border region, farmers can boost their productivity if they had better access to more modern agricultural procedures and products.

 

So in exchange for their help, farmers sell their produce, especially corn and manioc, to the Rwandans...

 

Protecting smallest farmers

 

Because they work hand-in-hand with these traders, local farmers with smaller output are starting to develop better procedures for their size...

 

...The aim is also to reduce the waste caused by transportation and tariffs at the border that farmers have had to pay whenever they go to Rwanda to buy seeds or to sell their harvest...

 


Via Anne Matho, FANRPAN, Robin Landis
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Why Africa can't feed itself

Why Africa can't feed itself | Africa | Scoop.it

Sub-Sahara Africa has ample fertile land, plenty of water and a generally favourable climate for food production. It also has some of the fastest growing economies. Yet, the region is the world's most food insecure - not least because its governments don't play their part...

 

Even though 70 percent of Africans are farmers, the continent continues to experience hunger and famine, especially in the Horn of Africa and the Sahel region...One in four people in sub-Saharan Africa are undernourished, and every third child is stunted, according to a 2012 human development report of the United Nations Development Programme...Ironically, countries that heavily rely on agriculture are worst affected by food insecurity. That is because 90 per cent of Africa's food supply is produced by smallholders. And they produce so little, that half of them are food insecure themselves...

 

...The reasons for food insecurity are complex. They include crop failure due to droughts and floods, poverty, conflict and HIV. But misguided policies and weak institutions are the main culprits for hunger, experts argue...Self-serving elites are monopolising state revenues while emptying the country's resources instead of creating jobs and building industry...Many African governments continued to sideline agriculture by bestowing subsidies, incentives and macroeconomic support on other sectors.

 

“The cost of food production for smallholder farmers today is so high, it's not viable as a business”.


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