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Russia to help Northern Africa to resolve water resources issue - The Voice of Russia

Russia to help Northern Africa to resolve water resources issue - The Voice of Russia | Africa | Scoop.it
Russia to help Northern Africa to resolve water resources issue
The Voice of Russia
The issue of water resources deficit is becoming more acute in many regions of the world. Northern Africa is currently one of the «hot spots».
Monique Brouwer's insight:

This article is about the conflicts between the countries using the Nile River as a primary water source. In the 1950s an agreement was signed by Egypt and Sudan regarding the division of the water of the Nile River. However agricultural and industry development has accelerated and expanded to levels that weren't possible in the 1950s. It has been agreed that the agreement must be updated. Addis-Ababa has started a project to erect a huge hydro power station in the upper part of the Blue Nile River - the main artery of the great river. Ethiopia has many allies. Cairo has admitted the need for mutual agreements. The negations between Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia have begun with no result. The world community, including Russia, is working to help make a mutually agreeable solution.

 

This article helps me understand that water is in high demand in the northern region of Africa. That the water the Nile RIver supplies to the people is in high demand. As I understand the people in power want to better their country and they want more of what is so valuable - rare - that they won't collaborate with others first. They seek resources; to own the most of everything, even when it isn't possible. However the world community is seeking to create an equal and benefiting outcome for all the countries involved.

 

I think that this article is very informing and that it will help the readers understand more of the problems that Africa is facing in the north regarding water usage. This article helped me see more fully that water is an integral part of life and that it is not always readily accessible in other parts of the world. I hope that the they come to find common ground on this situation and find a possible solution that benefits all parties.

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Climate change overburdens fragile states, exacerbates regional conflicts

Climate change overburdens fragile states, exacerbates regional conflicts | Africa | Scoop.it

INTERVIEW with Jean Christophe Hoste, a Research Fellow at the Africa Program of Egmon

The ongoing global warming contributes to an increase in armed conflicts in Africa claim two American scientists Solomon Hsiang and Kyle Meng. According to their article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, due to climate change, about 400,000 people will be affected by regional conflicts in Africa by 2030.

 

Could you comment on some American scientists’ allegations that climate change adds to an increase in armed conflicts in Africa? Does that make sense to you?

 

I think clime change is better to view as a threat multiplier which exacerbates the existing trends, tensions and instability. And the core challenge really is that climate change threatens to overburden states that are already fragile and conflict-prone. So, as a matter of fact climate change can have a cascading effect. So, the vacation can lead to migration, which in turn can lead to conflicts over territory. There is a very concrete example of that.

 

Chad in 2007 increased the security in the region, which lead to urbanization. The refugees went to the more secure areas, which led to the fact that they installed themselves on Arab land led to food security issues. But to say that climate change will actually be a source of conflict in itself, I don’t think that’s the case.

 

Other scientists mention political and economic factors that they allege lead to armed conflicts. Who do you think is right?

 

Indeed, this is more mine line of thinking. Climate change is not a driver of conflict. And the relation of violent conflict to climate change should not be overstated. The issue is that it is even counterproductive to say so. And I think the Darfur conflict of the 2000’s is the perfect example. President al-Bashir at that time tried to sell the Darfur conflict as the first climate war, while the basis of the conflict was actually a competition over an access to resources, political relations and tribal issues, which the current dynamics of the conflict in SOUTH SUDAN is a good illustration of. So, I think, yes, indeed, political and economic factors are more important factors that can lead to conflicts all over the world and, in this case, in Africa.

 

What is your personal position on the conflicts in general? What is your forecast, will the next fear years see a growth in armed conflicts in Africa?

 

I’m sure that the current instability in Africa, as we’ve seen with the conflict that I’ve just mentioned in SOUTH SUDAN, will increase before it gets any better indeed. The issues of instability, all sorts of driving issues that are essential to get dealt with will increase the instability and the conflicts in Africa and worldwide.


Via Robin Landis
Monique Brouwer's insight:

This article is about how the global warming/climate change in Africa and how people view its effect on the economy, government and internal conflicts within Africa. This article helps me understand that Africa is having alot of armed conflics and that the problems are escalating; the climate change is viewed as something that does effect the economy, government and the conflicts, but by others it is viewed as something of a distraction and just adds more conflicts to the ones already brewing. Specificaly I think that the climate is esential to plat and crop groth there for to life. However I don't think the armed conflicts in Africa have anything to do with the climate change unless they were fighting for food. I do think that the conflicts are important and people should work to help solve them but I don't think it has anything to do with the climate change.

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Elephants in Jeopardy in Central African Republic

Elephants in Jeopardy in Central African Republic | Africa | Scoop.it
One of the most important remaining populations of African forest elephants lives in and around Dzanga Bai.
Monique Brouwer's insight:

One of the most important remaining populations of African forest elephants lives in and around Dzanga Bai. Criminals are shooting the elephants for their tusks due to demand in the world market. WCS and WWF is taking immediate action to stop the killing of the elephants. About 35,000 elephants are killed each year and it is said that about 65% of forest elephants in Central Africa have been slaughtered over the past 10 years. As I understand this is, and will continue to be an increasing problem all over Africa. There are measures being taken to prevent further damage to the elephants' population by placing them in wild elephant conservations. It is of my opinion that this article helps people become more aware of the crime against elephants and how it effects the people and nature around them.

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