Africa
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African Refugees stand up to Israeli racism

African Refugees stand up to Israeli racism | Africa | Scoop.it
Dear friends,
please find below my latest article published in Red Flag about the Freedom Marches and the struggle of African refugees in Israel.

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
Sunbin Back's insight:

This article is about the Freedom Marches and the struggle of the African refugees in Israel. More than 3000 Sudanese and Eritrean refugees and their Israeli supporters took the streets of Tel Aviv on 21 December, chanting "No more prison! We are refugees! We want freedom."  The protest came from hundreds of African refugees who are in opposition to Israel's denial of work permits and failure to process asylum claims. They marched hundreds of miles in bitter cold, and in result, a number of refugees collapsed from exhaustion. Israeli  police surrounded the protesters, using violence to make them go back. Currently there are more than 50,000 African refugees in Israel, majority from Sudan and Eritrea. However, Israel do not want to accept them in their country. Thus, Israel has jailed all asylum seekers without trial for a minimum of three years.

 

This article helps me understand Africa because I can know how there are so many refugees in Africa. In the book I read, "Now is the time for running", it showed the background of how it is like to be a refugees with no one welcoming you. Therefore I could know that many refugees are struggling with the hatred of others, and how they are not treated fairly just because they are from other countries.

 

I thought that this article was interesting, the way the refugees marched such a long distance in the bitter cold, so they can show the people that they do not like the way they are treated. I didn't really think that there might be such problems when they become refugees, but after  read the book, and read the article, I could know how sad it is to become a refugee in another country. Therefore I feel bad for them, the way they are not treated fairly.

 

 

 

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Water and Sanitation in Africa - World Press Review

Water and Sanitation in Africa - World Press Review | Africa | Scoop.it
World Press Review Water and Sanitation in AfricaWorld Press Review He says access to drinking water goes hand in hand with access to improved sanitation and hygiene education, which is much less widespread.
Sunbin Back's insight:

In many African villages, clean drinking water is a luxury, and every day, the women start their days by waling for miles in the hope of finding it. In Burundi, a community has sometimes have running water. Therefore a family had to camp our in front of the tap and stay there until they had enough water to fill a jug or a bucket. When there is no water, people are scared of catching some epidemic disease, due to not being able to wash their hands. Diarrhea linked to unclean water kills 24,000 children around the world every day. Also the trouble about the sanitation is another major problem in Africa. In Botswana, over 90 percent of the population has accessed to clean drinking water, but only 60 percent has improved sanitation. 

 

This article helps me understand Africa, because I get to know how water is such a crucial resource in Africa. I have already learned that many people try to have access to water by irrigation system etc. However, I learned that there are still many areas in Africa where people still do not have access to water, and are afraid that they might get diseases that are very dangerous. 

 

I think that the article was pretty interesting, because even though I knew that Africa still lacked water systems, I learned more information. I liked the way there were many NGOs trying to help sanitation and getting access to clean water in many places in Africa. 

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One Million Children Labor in Africa's Goldmines | PBS NewsHour | July 10, 2013

One Million Children Labor in Africa's Goldmines | PBS NewsHour | July 10, 2013 | Africa | Scoop.it
In Burkina Faso, gold production has more than doubled in recent years. Though child labor is against the law in the West African nation, the economics and the nature of mining make labor law enforcement extremely difficult.

Via Samuel Poos
Sunbin Back's insight:

Africa is famous for gold, and many people work on gold mines in Africa. However, the truth we do not know is that there are not only men, but  children working in that harsh place. There are children that are even 7 years old, working in that pitch-dark pitch. A million children between ages 5 and 17 work in the gold mines of Africa for $2 a day or receive only food. Thus an entire family might make at most $5 a day. 30 percent to 50 percent of the workers are children, even though child labor is against the law. Some little children fill dirt and rocks into shallow bowl, which becomes their share of the "take" from the gold mine. When gold is found, all the miners will get a little money. 

 

From this, I can know that how bad child labor is in Africa. I didn't know that it was that bad. It was really shocking how all they get for smashing rocks and carrying heavy buckets is $2. I could understand how many African children can't have education because they have to help their family work.

 

I thought that this article was very interesting as well, because I didn't really know about how severe child labor is in Africa. It was also shocking how many children couldn't go to school, but had to work for almost about 12 hours getting only $2. 

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Kaleigh & Lauren:)'s curator insight, April 13, 2014 10:26 PM

Economics:  Burkina Faso has more than doubled gold production in the past years, but it's due to more than 1 million children in forced labor.  They smash boulders into pebbles and haul buckets of water up a hill in search of gold flakes.  The U.S department of labor is funding a four year, 5 million dollar project in B.K to reduce child labor in cotton farming and gold mining.

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Three 'Geekettes' Speak Out About Women, Technology and New Media In Africa - International Business Times

Three 'Geekettes' Speak Out About Women, Technology and New Media In Africa - International Business Times | Africa | Scoop.it
Three 'Geekettes' Speak Out About Women, Technology and New Media In Africa International Business Times “The African geekette is still too rare, but she's also an incredible reservoir of ideas, projects and progress,” said Julie Owono, a lawyer...
Sunbin Back's insight:

Africa's technology is developing very rapidly. As the information technology is introduced to the young people of Africa, it is poised to become one of the continent's most important sections. It is not perfect, but the countries in Africa is recently supporting the women in the industry, or Africa's "geekettes". They are still rare, but they are incredibly smart, with different ideas of world of new media. However, the administration in Cameroon hasn't yet understood technology, thus there are many complaints that infrastructure is a major problem for everyone in tech. Fortunately, African women are starting to be judged more fairly and knowing how to find a place for themselves. People believe that there should be no difference between men and women, but what's important is whether they are good with tech or not. 

 

This article shows me two things about Africa. First, it shows

me how the technology is low developed in the countries of Africa. However, they are starting to improve with better ideas and knowledge. These knowledge and ideas do not only come from men, but also women as well. Therefore I can know that  the women are starting to be treated more fairly with less gender judgments. Therefore I can know that Africa is improving the problems they had. 

 

This topic is interesting, because I have always known that the technology and the gender racism. However, when I read this article, I felt fascinated by how Africa is improving slowly, but steadily. 

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Communal violence turns deadly in Nigeria

Communal violence turns deadly in Nigeria | Africa | Scoop.it
Latest incidents in Kaduna and Borno states raise fears of more religious violence in run-up to presidential poll.
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A different approach to elevating education in Africa - Devex

A different approach to elevating education in Africa - Devex | Africa | Scoop.it
A different approach to elevating education in Africa
Devex
RTI International, an independent nonprofit research institute, began a new push to elevate education in Africa. ...

Via Developing Education
Sunbin Back's insight:

In Liberia, the school buildings were shattered in the result of fourteen years of civil war. The students became refugees which led the an entire generation of children to grow up with out much of education. Many organizations helped rebuild Liberia, but a broken education system remained. The organization also did an experiment on the students of the schools in Liberia. Students that go to school, and participate the full program succeeded the most, and showed intelligence. To have many students illiterate and have education, many organizations have tried hard. There were several problems in having children to have schooling. Some families have children to farming, labor, or house chores, and do not send them to school. Secondly, the students have to walk a long walk to school, which is dangerous to girls, may being put at risk of abuse. Also the organization RTI tries to focus on giving the teacher the language of instruction, so the kids show improvement in reading, and have their parents persuaded the send their kids to school. 

 

This article helps me really understand Africa, because Africa does not have much education. Also I can learn that due to civil wars in the countries, it can affect many stuffs. Also I can know that the education in Africa is improving, and getting better with many help of others. 

 

I thought that this article was pretty cool because I liked the way Africa was not really a improving continent in the past. However, as more and more organizations help to have more education for the children, that area is improving steadily. Therefore I thought that it was nice how the people were really working hard to help them become better people in the countries. 

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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:49 AM

This article is under intellectual because it talks about the education in liberia and how the public schools have been split into three different groups.

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Child marriage could trigger surge in Africa's under-15s pregnancy rate – UN

Child marriage could trigger surge in Africa's under-15s pregnancy rate – UN | Africa | Scoop.it
UN population survey predicts steep climb in young girls giving birth in sub-Saharan Africa unless child marriage is banned (UN sounds dire warning on #childbrides in sub-Saharan Africa - predicted increase of 1 million + by 2030

Via Counter Trafficking
Sunbin Back's insight:

There is a great number of child marriage and girls giving birth before the age of 15 in sub-Saharan Africa. The married girls are facing the challenge of adolescent pregnancy, and major changes are needed  in addressing teenage pregnancies.  Girls should be kept in school until they are 18, with more education and access to health services. Boys should be educated about girl's rights and enforcing laws against child marriage. One in three girls in developing countries is married before the age of 18, and 50 million children are at risk of being married before 15, and they have no choice. Girls do not have much rights as the boys, so they cannot decide what they want to do. Some girls are risk at death and disability from early pregnancy. About 70,000 adolescents in poorer countries die annually due to childbirth, and nine out of ten pregnant teenager in poor countries are married . The people think that child marriage will help them from low-income households with little or no education. 

 

From reading this article, I could understand how many young girls are suffering about child marriage in Africa. I knew that there was some child marriage but I never knew that there would be so many and that it is a big crisis in Africa. I have never understood why they are getting married in such a young age, but now I know that it is poverty and low education system that created this. 

 

This article is very sad, because the girls who are suffering child marriage are about my age, or younger. I thought that it was really insane, and I hope that this problem and be solved, or have less number of child marriage by many people providing them better education. 

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Child Marriage in 2013: Third of Women in Developing World Married Before 18

Child Marriage in 2013: Third of Women in Developing World Married Before 18 | Africa | Scoop.it
Countries with the highest percentage of child marriage are in West and Central Africa and in South Asia.

 

About a third of women (400 million) aged 20-24 years old in the developing world were married as children, according to a 2013 report by Unicef.

Article 16 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), stated: "The betrothal and the marriage of a child shall have no legal effect, and all necessary action, including legislation, shall be taken to specify a minimum age for marriage".

This statute was ratified by 187 countries ( not including the US, Iran, Palau, Somalia, Sudan and Tonga).

Even when a minimum age is guaranteed by law, this is not often implemented or enforced.

In 50 countries, the minimum legal age of marriage is lower for females than for men, UN Women reported.

Gender inequality, poverty, lack of education and violence against women and girls are major factors in child marriage.

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As ivory poaching returns to Africa's plains, campaigners pin hopes on curbing ... - The Guardian

As ivory poaching returns to Africa's plains, campaigners pin hopes on curbing ... - The Guardian | Africa | Scoop.it
The Guardian
As ivory poaching returns to Africa's plains, campaigners pin hopes on curbing ...
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