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Teacher Deanna Jump makes one million dollars selling school lesson plans

Teacher Deanna Jump makes one million dollars selling school lesson plans | aect | Scoop.it
If you want to get rich, let's just say teaching is not the career. Make that wasn't the career. Deanna Jump is turning such thinking upside-down. She's a millionaire, and teaching got her there.
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MI-AECT: Educational technology and social learning with new media
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How To Teach Differently

How To Teach Differently | aect | Scoop.it
How To Teach Differently
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Computer tutors that can read students’ emotions - The Hechinger Report

Computer tutors that can read students’ emotions  - The Hechinger Report | aect | Scoop.it
Human tutors — teachers who work closely with students, one on one — are unrivaled in their ability to promote deep and lasting learning. Education researchers have known this for more than 30 years, but until recently they haven’t paid much attention to one important reason why tutoring is so effective: the management of emotion. …
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Education & Technology in an Age of Pandemics (revisited)

Education & Technology in an Age of Pandemics (revisited) | aect | Scoop.it
consider this picture MOOCs -- massively open online courses of the sort that can simultaneously enroll thousands, even tens of thousands, of learners simultaneously -- have been a hot topic of discussion for a few years now in both the worlds of education and 'international development' (and, for what it's worth, the subject of numerous related posts here on the World Bank's EduTech blog). Recent news that edX, one of the prominent MOOC platforms, is to start offering courses aimed at high school students suggests that the potential usefulness and impact of things like MOOCs may soon extend beyond the realm of higher education, out of which MOOCs originally emerged and where most related activity has occurred to date. There is much (potentially) to be excited about here. Few would argue against having greater access to more learning opportunities, especially when those opportunities are offered for 'free', where there is latent unmet demand, and where the opportunities themselves are well constructed and offer real value for learners. As with MOOCs at the level of higher education, however, we perhaps shouldn't be too surprised if these new opportunities at the high school level are first seized upon *not* by some of the groups with the greatest learning needs -- for example, students in overcrowded, poorly resourced secondary schools in developing countries, or even students who would like a secondary education, but for a variety of reasons aren't able to receive one -- but rather by those best placed to take advantage of them. This has been largely been the case for initial adopters of MOOCs. (One of the first studies of this aspect of the 'MOOC Phenomenon', which looked at MOOCs from the University of Pennsylvania, found that students tended to be "young, well educated, and employed, with a majority from developed countries.") As a practical matter, some of the first types of beneficiaries may, for example (and I am just speculating here), be homeschooling families in North America (while not necessarily comparatively 'rich' by local standards, such families need to be affluent enough to be able to afford to have one parent stay at home with the kids, and generally have pretty good Internet connectivity); international schools around the world (which can offer a broader range of courses to students interested in an 'American' education); and the families of 'foreign' students looking to apply to college in the United States (the edX course “COL101x: The Road to Selective College Admissions” looks, at least to my eyes, tailor made for certain segments of the population of learners in places like China, Korea, Hong Kong, etc.). In other words, at least in the near term, a Matthew Effect in Educational Technology may be apparent, where those who are best placed to benefit from the introduction of a new technology tool or innovation are the ones who indeed benefit from it the most. Longer term, though, it is possible to view this news about movement of a major MOOC platform into the area of secondary education as one further indication that we are getting further along from the 'front end of the e-learning wave' (of which MOOCs are but one part) to something that will eventually have a greater mass impact beyond what is happening now in the 'rich' countries of North America and the OECD. Learning with new technologies has of course been around for many decades but, broadly speaking, has not (yet) had the 'transformational' impact that has long been promised. "Gradually, then suddenly" is how one of Ernest Hemingway's characters famously describes how he went bankrupt. Might this be how the large scale adoption of educational technologies will eventually happen as well in much of the world? I black swan f so, one credible potential tipping point may be a 'black swan' event that could push all of this stuff into the mainstream, especially in places where it to date has been largely peripheral: some sort of major health-related scare. (For those unfamiliar with the term, which was popularized by Nicholas Taleb, a 'black swan' is a rare event that people don't anticipate but which has profound consequences). One of the first ever posts on the EduTech blog, Education & Technology in an Age of Pandemics, looked at some of what had been learned about how teachers and learners use new technologies to adapt when schools were closed in response to outbreaks involving the H1N1 influenza virus: the 'swine flu' that afflicted many in Mexico about six years ago; and an earlier outbreak of 'bird flu' in China. I have recently been fielding many calls as a result of the current outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa asking essentially, 'Can we do anything with technology to help our students while our schools are closed?', and so I thought it might be useful to revisit, and update, that earlier post, in case doing so might be a useful contribution to a number of related discussions are occurring. ---
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Games in the Classroom Reading List – ProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Games in the Classroom Reading List – ProfHacker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | aect | Scoop.it
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Teaching Our Teachers: Arne Duncan on Bridging the Digital Divide

Teaching Our Teachers: Arne Duncan on Bridging the Digital Divide | aect | Scoop.it
We caught up with Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education, to address the most pressing issues facing education today.
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Games in the Classroom: Overcoming the Obstacles

Games in the Classroom: Overcoming the Obstacles | aect | Scoop.it
There are ways around every obstacle.
Tim Boileau's insight:

A recent survey from the Games and Learning Publishing Council asked 700 teachers to identify and rank the major barriers to using games in the classroom. Here are the top 10 obstacles they list and ideas about how to overcome each one.

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What we are learning about reading on mobile phones and devices in developing countries

What we are learning about reading on mobile phones and devices in developing countries | aect | Scoop.it
Mobile Reading Survey:
Key Findings

1. Mobile reading opens up new pathways to literacy for marginalized groups, particularly women and girls, and others who may not have access to paper books.
2. People use mobile devices to read to children, thereby supporting literacy acquisition and other forms of learning.
3. People seem to enjoy reading more and read more often when they use mobile devices to access text.
4. People read on mobile devices for identifiable reasons that can be promoted to encourage mobile reading.
5. Most mobile readers are young, yet people of various ages are capable of using mobile technology to access long-form reading material. More can be done to encourage older people to use technology as a portal to text.
6. Current mobile readers tend to have completed more schooling than is typical.
7. There appears to be a demand for mobile reading platforms with text in local languages, level-appropriate text and text written by local authors.

from Reading in the Mobile Era, UNESCO 2014

they tell me my generation is supposed to be able to 'leap frog' Each year on 8 September, groups around the world gather together to celebrate "International Literacy Day", which is meant to highlight the importance of reading, and of being able to read. In the words of UNESCO, the UN organization which sponsors International Literacy Day, "Literacy is one of the key elements needed to promote sustainable development, as it empowers people so that they can make the right decisions in the areas of economic growth, social development and environmental integration." As contentious as issues around education around the world can be at times, there is little debate about the fundamental importance of literacy to most human endeavors. New technologies can play important roles in helping to enable efforts and activities to teach people to learn how to read -- and to provide people with access to reading materials. As part of its communications outreach on International Literacy Day this year, for example, UNESCO highlighted recent experiences in Senegal targeting illiterate girls and women, where it has found that "mobile phones, computers, internet and TV make literacy courses much more attractive for illiterate women." The potential for mobile phones and other mobile devices like e-readers to aid in literacy efforts has been a recurrent theme explored on the EduTech blog. In so-called 'developing countries', books may be scarce and/or expensive in many communities -- and reading materials that *are* locally available may not be of great interest or relevance to many potential readers. The fact that increasing numbers of people in such communities are carrying small portable electronic devices with them at all times capable of displaying text, and which indeed can hold tens, even thousands of digital 'books', has not gone unnoticed by organizations seeking to increase literacy and promote reading. Two recent publications -- Reading in the Mobile Era and Mobiles for Reading: A Landscape Review -- attempt to take stock of and learn from many of the leading efforts around the world in this regard.
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The 12 Learning Principles Video Games Promote ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

The 12 Learning Principles Video Games Promote ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | aect | Scoop.it
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Taking Classroom Tech Use to the Next Level: Specific Traits to Look For

Taking Classroom Tech Use to the Next Level: Specific Traits to Look For | aect | Scoop.it
Dissatisfied with existing frameworks used to judge the effectiveness of classroom tech a group of instructional coaches are trying to build their own tool with help from other educators.
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A Handy List Of Resources For Teaching About September 11th | Edudemic

A Handy List Of Resources For Teaching About September 11th | Edudemic | aect | Scoop.it
When you look at the US compared with the rest of the world, our history looks pretty darned short. We have the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, and a handful of other significant events marking our relatively brief 238 year old history. Furthermore, for today’s students, these events are quite far flung from the reality they …
Tim Boileau's insight:

Converting tragedy into teachable moments.

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Pearson study: Students see tablets as transformative to higher ed [Infographic]

Pearson study: Students see tablets as transformative to higher ed [Infographic] | aect | Scoop.it
Still, almost twice as many students use laptops regularly compared to tablets.
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No need to teach girls differently online - The Hechinger Report

No need to teach girls differently online - The Hechinger Report | aect | Scoop.it
To hear some ed tech enthusiasts tell it, online learning is sweeping aside the barriers that have in the past prevented access to education. But such pronouncements are premature. As it turns out, students often carry these barriers right along with them, from the real world into the virtual one. Female students, for example, are …
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MOOC Provider Gets Into College Counseling – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

MOOC Provider Gets Into College Counseling – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | aect | Scoop.it
Tim Boileau's insight:

Interesting proposition, as we begin to considering the role of advising and mentoring in alternative learning environments.

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4 Great Visual Organizers for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

4 Great Visual Organizers for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | aect | Scoop.it
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Decoding the DNA of an eLearning Course: 5 Essential Instructional Elements

Decoding the DNA of an eLearning Course: 5 Essential Instructional Elements | aect | Scoop.it
f you want to create an eLearning course, follow the example of the cell cycle, as each teaching unit is divided into a number of elements, indispensable for enabling learning.
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Microsoft buys Minecraft

Microsoft buys Minecraft | aect | Scoop.it
Mojang's popular game Minecraft has sold over 54 million copies. But that, and the $2.5 billion that Microsoft just paid to acquir
Tim Boileau's insight:

Be sure to check out the links in this news items for interesting insight to the culture of Minecraft, it's creator, and implications for games in education.

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After Ferguson, Some Black Academics Wonder: Does Pursuing a Ph.D. Matter?

After Ferguson, Some Black Academics Wonder: Does Pursuing a Ph.D. Matter? | aect | Scoop.it
It's not just that following the news takes energy away from research work. For many scholars of color, it raises broader questions, too.
Tim Boileau's insight:

This is an important conversation.

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The Story of OERs

This presentation narrates the emergence of OERs, what are OERs and how we can network and collaborate to create, share OERs.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Won Ho's curator insight, September 13, 8:05 AM

It says everything about openness and education.

 

오픈의 정신과 교육에 대한 모든 것을 담고 있는 프레젠테이션

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Software Will Not 'Eat' Education (EdSurge News)

Software Will Not 'Eat' Education (EdSurge News) | aect | Scoop.it
Marc Andreessen, with the support of long-time colleague and amateur rapper Ben Horowitz, famously lead Andreessen Horowitz with the thesis that software will “eat the world.” Naturally, I wonder whether it will “eat” education.
Most recently, Andreessen and Horowitz suggest healthcare, educati
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eLearning vs Classroom Training—How Different Are They?

eLearning vs Classroom Training—How Different Are They? | aect | Scoop.it
The following is a list of the main differences between classroom training and eLearning to help new professionals in the industry get started.
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10 Ways To Use Instagram In Your Classroom | Edudemic

10 Ways To Use Instagram In Your Classroom | Edudemic | aect | Scoop.it
Instagram is a hugely popular social network for photo sharing. Though the use of social media in the classroom may have skyrocketed, Twitter and Facebook definitely reign supreme as the key social media tools for schools and teachers. Somehow, despite the widespread popularity of Instagram, few teachers are employing it in the classroom. We’ve heard …
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A Response to "OER Beyond Voluntarism"

A Response to "OER Beyond Voluntarism" | aect | Scoop.it
Well, this has turned into a rather enjoyable conversation. To recap what has unfolded so far: It began with Jose Ferreira inviting me to appear on a panel at the Knewton Symposium, on the panel, I...
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A Handy Visual Featuring The 7 Learning Styles ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Handy Visual Featuring The 7 Learning Styles ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | aect | Scoop.it
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10 lessons learned from MOOCs

10 lessons learned from MOOCs | aect | Scoop.it
From what works best to clues about the model's future viability, what have massive open online courses taught us?
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Relationship Building Through Culturally Responsive Classroom Management

Relationship Building Through Culturally Responsive Classroom Management | aect | Scoop.it
Hone your skills like curiosity, listening, cultural sensitivity, and humor to provide all students with equitable opportunities for learning.
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