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Rescooped by Roxanne M. from Disability News Update
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How to judge college learning disability programs - CBS News

How to judge college learning disability programs - CBS News | advsing | Scoop.it
CBS NewsHow to judge college learning disability programsCBS NewsAlthough schools must provide support services and accommodations to student with learning disabilities, App says that what institutions actually offer varies dramatically.

Via Beth Case, Shaji Mathew
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Rescooped by Roxanne M. from MyAdvisorSays
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Student advising plays key role in college success

Student advising plays key role in college success | advsing | Scoop.it
U.S. universities had, on average, one adviser for every 367 students last year, down from one for every 282 in 2003, according to a survey by NACADA and the college-admissions testing company ACT. Though more students than ever ...

Via Advisor Sereno
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Sandra Avalos's curator insight, November 27, 2013 11:00 AM

There is nothing like the personalized nature of having an actual advisor who can do more than just help you enroll in classes. Advising is more than that, it is looking at the person as a whole. Technology is important, but it can't replace a human being. 

Gerene Keesler's curator insight, August 26, 2015 11:04 AM

This is very true. This is not a cut universities can afford

Rescooped by Roxanne M. from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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12 Questions to Ask About a College's Disability Services | The ...

12 Questions to Ask About a College's Disability Services | The ... | advsing | Scoop.it

 

Like other college-bound students, those with learning differences or ADHD should make a point of visiting colleges before applying. However, in addition to visiting the admissions office, these students should also make a beeline to the Office of Disability Services to look for another type of match: support services with the appropriate accommodations for their needs.

Although all colleges are required by law to offer support services and accommodations, the level of support and types of accommodations available to students with learning differences varies widely from campus to campus, ranging from basic to comprehensive.

A visit to the Office of Disability Services is an opportunity to ask about the availability of support and accommodations that will help the student be successful in college by putting him or her on a level playing field with peers.

 

Here are important questions to ask:

 

How current must my testing be to to apply for accommodations?

How many students use your services?
What Assistive Technology (AT) services do you offer? Do you have an AT expert on staff?
What accommodations do you offer? What are the procedures and timelines to receive them?
How many Disabilities Support counselors do you have on your staff? Do they act as liasions?
If a professor is not in compliance regarding the student’s needed accommodations, how is the situation resolved?
What is the procedure to get extended time on exams? How much notice is required? Do students arrange extended time with professors or through the Disabilities Services Office?
Where do students take exams? Who proctors?
What do you consider the most difficult majors/classes for Disabilities Support students on this campus?
Will I have both an advisor in the Disabilities Services Office and a regular academic advisor? If both, how will the two advisors work with each other?
What is the four-year graduation rate for students with learning disabilities similar to mine?
Do you track students who have used your services after graduation? If so, what do your findings show about their success after graduation?


Via Lou Salza
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Rescooped by Roxanne M. from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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How tougher classes in high school can help kids make it through college

Some 40 percent of students are failing to graduate from college in six years. A study calls for higher-quality college prep, with more advanced math, advanced placement classes, and better advising.


Via Mel Riddile
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