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The Convergence of Medical And Consumer Health Apps

The Convergence of Medical And Consumer Health Apps | Advertising technologies | Scoop.it
Consumer healthcare apps linked to smartphones or wearable devices are growing in popularity, and forthcoming offerings from Apple and Google are likely to draw more attention to the field. These systems allow users to monitor a range of information—heart rate, calories burned, distance walked—but they don’t guarantee a change in behavior, much less an improvement in health.Still, many doctors and clinicians see great potential for mobile medical apps. According to an April article in Modern Healthcare, 2013 “saw the beginning of convergence between devices and apps used by clinicians and those used by consumers.” In the future, experts see the integration of consumer apps and devices into “a comprehensive healthcare and wellness information system,” that could enable medical professionals to help patients manage their health, according to the report
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\The ubiquity of smartphones and tablets is creating opportunities for that to happen, but hurdles remain, including the as-yet-uncertain regulatory demands on those who create and deploy apps that not only take measurements but actually prescribe a course of action for a patient.When used in a clinical setting monitored by physicians, mobile apps are already leading to improved health. In a recent cardiac rehabilitation program at the Mayo Clinic, patients who used a smartphone-based app developed by the clinic to record daily measurements such as blood pressure, weight, blood sugar levels, minutes of physical activity, and dietary habits over a three-month period were less likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 90 days of discharge, compared with those patients who followed a traditional regime. The app also provided educational materials that would formerly have been provided via books, CDs, and DVDs. The interactive nature of the process led to improved results.The cardiac rehab app was developed by the Clinic’s cardiology team in tandem with Dallas-based Healarium. “They had the proper platform already set up,” says R. Jay Widmer, an M.D./Ph.D. who oversaw the program at the Mayo Clinic. “We were able to integrate our requirements, so the task of setting it up wasn’t onerous.”“Physicians are embracing the trend,” says Widmer, “but there still isn’t enough data on digital health. This program was very specific to the Mayo Clinic and to what we do. I knew it would be successful because of that. But I don’t have the same level of trust for mainstream apps.”The Mayo Clinic’s digital health efforts extend beyond cardiac rehabilitation. Doctors there are working on digital health efforts in internal medicine, general health, musculoskeletal, and pediatric care. “The trend is likely to keep expanding,” says Widmer. “Digital certainly has the capability to do a lot, but we’re going to need more data to have widespread implementation.”Among the many benefits digital medicine confers is the ability to extend the reach of doctors. The Mayo Clinic has a number of satellite offices, and mobile apps allow patients even hundreds of miles away to check in with physicians. This isn’t just a matter of rural areas; even urban areas can be underserved, says Widmer—but increased use of smartphones and better outreach from hospitals is beginning to change that.More innovations are emerging at the Center for Digital Health Innovation at the University of California, San Francisco. It is “an oasis of agility,” created to spur a range of innovations from sensor development to consumer-facing self-management apps, enterprise technologies that support research and clinical care, and Big Data analytics, according to Aenor Sawyer, M.D., Associate Director of Strategic Relations.Four large projects underway at the center include: CareWeb, a “Care-team collaborative platform that uses social and mobile communications technology built on Salesforce.com;” Tidepool, which is building the infrastructure for a new generation of smart diabetes apps; Health eHeart, “a clinical trials platform using social media, mobile technology, and novel real-time sensors to revolutionize heart disease;” and Trinity, which provides “precision team care by integrating patient data with multidisciplinary input and evidence” via secure online collaboration for virtual tumor board and case conferences.“With Health eHeart,” says Sawyer, “we’ve been able to leverage social media, data aggregating platforms, and remote activity and physiologic sensing, to extend the reach of clinical research. Participants can go online, create a profile, provide their history, and update their outcomes. They can also send genomic information back to us through a ‘spit kit.’ It has rapidly increased patient recruitment by magnitudes over traditional methods, at a fraction of the cost.”For the Health eHeart, which combines a Web-based program with a mobile app, the center partnered with sensor maker AliveCor to offer remote access to electrocardiography; physiological sensor company iHealth; and Ginger.io, which helped create an aggregating dashboard and patient portal.The center’s CareWeb “is putting into a single secure platform all the ways we communicate as a care team in the hospital—phone, e-mail, voice, text, medical records,” says Sawyer. “There will also be a portal so the patient and designated family can access the information, making them part of the care team.”Many of these projects ultimately become products, available to other centers and consumers, says Sawyer. “Our frontline innovations undergo extensive evaluation during development and after implementation.” Once we have shown, through proof-of-concept testing, that they are effective in care and cost, I feel we are obligated to get these solutions scaled up and out of the university, into the world to provide greater benefit.”
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Survey: 80% of smartphone users would like to use their devices to interact with HCPs

Survey: 80% of smartphone users would like to use their devices to interact with HCPs | Advertising technologies | Scoop.it
A survey (n=2,239) of smartphone users across geographies found that: * 71% of smartphone users are open to offers of relevant health care services from businesses * 80% of patients would like the option to use their smartphones to interact with health care providers * 56% of people worldwide trust health care organisations with personal data and indicated that while e-health records have yet to take off in many countries, innovations around mobile alerts and information services are helping build trust
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Marcus Healey's curator insight, July 15, 2014 4:24 PM

The impending m-health revolution is in its infancy, but coming sooner than planned?

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Survey: 80 percent of smartphone users want to interact with doctors on mobile devices

Survey: 80 percent of smartphone users want to interact with doctors on mobile devices | Advertising technologies | Scoop.it
Eighty percent of smartphone users are interested in using their smartphones to interact with health care providers, according to a FICO survey of 2,239 adult smartphone users from the UK, Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, and the United States. The survey analyzed how consumers prefer to interact with health care providers on mobile devices, online and in-person.
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Helen Adams's curator insight, July 3, 2014 4:22 AM

Now that depends on what they mean by "interact", are they meaning consultation with their HCP or accessing test results and repeat prescriptions.

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FDA issues two draft guidances on Social Media

FDA issues two draft guidances on Social Media | Advertising technologies | Scoop.it
Two NEW FDA DRAFT Guidances On the Use of Social Media and Online Promotions of Devices and DrugsAfter five years in the making, the FDA is on a roll. Following the publication of the previous draft guidance on the use of social media for “post-marketing submissions for post marketing submissions of interactive promotional media“, the agency has published two new guidances of conduct of medical device and pharma companies in social media.The first seems easier to understand and implement than the second.Draft Guidance I: Correcting independent third-party misinformation about prescription drugs and medical devicesImagine the following: You work as a sales representative in a medical device company. It has come to your attention that a blogger wrote a post that contains inaccurate information about your medical device. On the same day, you learn of a patient that has shared personal experiences with your device on a forum and misinformed other patients about the device’s use. You believe that the way that both these stories are represented may be harmful to the public health. You start typing away at your answer, informing the blogger and forum members of their mistakes. FDA guidance suggests that you should stop first and ask yourself: is it worth your while?The FDA maintains that you have no obligation to correct any information published by a third party who is not under the firm’s control or influence. This is regardless of whether the firm owns or operates the platform on which the communication appears.The FDA leaves this to the discretion of the pharma company or medical devices company. If the company chooses to engage in the correction of misinformation, it needs to adhere to certain approaches outlined in the guidance – for instance it cannot only correct negative misinformation written about the medical device while ignoring an overstatement of the benefits of the product.Download complete draft FDA social media guidance on Correcting Independent Third-Party Misinformation about Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices.Draft Guidance II: Internet/social media platforms with character space limitationsThis FDA draft guidance is more comprehensive than the first and seems more complicated to execute. The guidance describes the FDA’s current thinking about how medical devices and drug manufacturers and marketers should present benefit and risk information of promotional materials in channels that have “character space limitations” (mainly Twitter, and “sponsored links” on search engines such as Google). The guidance does not include platforms such as Facebook and YouTube where there are no space limitations.The main takeaway: Risk information must appear alongside risk information. Both must be presented in the same message. The FDA clearly states that having risk information on only a Twitter cover photo is insufficient and that main risk information should be included in the short message as well. If a medical company concludes that adequate benefit and risk information, as well as other required information, cannot all be communicated within the same character-space-limited communication, then the firm should reconsider using that platform for the intended promotional message. To many companies, this will be the case. To make matters more complicated, a link should be should be supplied that brings visitors to a page that is solely dedicated to risk information.The guidance on how promotional materials should be prepared and presented goes on at length in its recommendation – using the example of a fictional drug they call NoFocus (And some people say that the FDA has no humor….).The use of so many examples shows how complex this field is and the extent to which the FDA does not have a clear grasp of the way it should be managed.Download complete draft FDA social media guidance on Internet/Social Media Platforms with Character Space Limitations— Presenting Risk and Benefit Information for Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices
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What is the main expense in social media marketing?

What is the main expense in social media marketing? | Advertising technologies | Scoop.it
Social media may be free, but as marketing on this digital platform grows more sophisticated, it also gets more expensive!A recent report from the Social Media Marketing University found that largest expense in social media budgets is staff, accounting for 37% of costs. So, how do they spend their time?
  1. 60% of respondents report that content development requires the bulk of the time dedicated to social.
  2. 12% spend time on strategy development.
  3. 10% said posting the content was the biggest time investment.
  4. 8% spent time on listening and monitoring.
  5. Only 4% of employee time was spent on measuring!
    Time Spent Marketing on Social Media
    Other interesting findings ::
    • 75% of businesses report that the time spent on social media has increased since last year, and 55% report that social spending has also increased.
    • Nearly 70% manage four or more social profiles.
    • Top social media expenditures include internal staff compensation (37%), social advertising (18%), external staff compensation (10%) and content (7%).
    • 77% report that based on the results they’ve achieved, social media is worth the time and money invested.

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Understanding the patient journey with strategic social intelligence

Understanding the patient journey with strategic social intelligence | Advertising technologies | Scoop.it
The age of patient-centricity and participatory medicine is fully underway; while debate continues as to what exactly patient-centricity constitutes, social media is helping patients play a much more active role in their healthcare than in the past.The convergence of the patient-centric era and the age of big data has not only completely changed the nature of the relationship between patients, physicians, and treatments, it has also opened up new avenues for the pharma industry to engage with patients in a language and via a medium that they understand.While a successful social media strategy will take account of the many channels and opportunities available, there is a useful distinction to be drawn between social media which is aimed atinfluencing patient behaviour, and activity which is designed to discover information about patient behaviour. As shorthand for these we can use social engagement and social listening, or even more concisely push social media versus pull social media."Non-compliance represents an enormous cost to the industry and to society"Comply or diePush activity is aimed at delivering information to patients which might assist them with managing their condition, perhaps improving patient adherence in the case of chronic conditions (where adherence is estimated by the World Health Organization to be around 50%) and in an investigational setting, where Osterberg & Baschke have estimated clinical trial adherence as ranging from 43 per cent to 78 per cent.Non-compliance represents an enormous cost to the industry and to society; it is estimated to have global costs to the pharmaceutical industry of as much as $956 billion globally, according to data presented by Thomas Forissier from Capgemini Consulting and Katrina Firlik of HealthPrize Technologies at the 2013 RxAdherence Conference. While some might dispute this astronomical figure, there can be no doubt that non-compliance represents a real burden to the industry.In an investigational setting it could be argued that compliance is even more critical: the sample size is smaller and so non-compliance from a relatively small section of the patient population might skew important data and have a bearing on whether a drug is approved and how effective it is. Indeed, it is estimated that a 20% reduction in adherence in a study can result in an increase in the sample size of up to 50% (with the attendant costs) to account for the potential data imbalance.The use of social and patient networks, groups and personalised messaging via social media are all important tools to bolster adherence and save time and money across the drug development lifecycle and in market."Social media sites are an indispensable tool for patient recruitment specialists, and open up an enormous stream of potential patients"There are also opportunities to recruit patients for international clinical studies via targeted social media campaigns. Many of us will have seen advertisements on the sidebar on Facebook inviting us to participate as healthy volunteers in clinical trials. In an online setting where only 27 per cent of internet users speak English, and Twitter and Facebook support more than 70 languages (to say nothing of non-US based social media platforms like Mixi, Orkut and Sina Weibo), global social media sites are an indispensable tool for patient recruitment specialists, and open up an enormous stream of potential patients.Those patients must of course meet the inclusion criteria of any study and provide their informed consent to participate. These risk mitigation measures will remain in place regardless of where patients are being sourced, so the common objection that social media is too uncontrolled does not hold.There do remain uncertainties around how the industry can engage with users via social media from a regulatory perspective, as FDA/EMA guidelines are still not quite clear, but given the cost of delays due to recruitment and enrolment, not to mention the costs of replenishing data lost or skewed due to inadequate adherence, these uncertainties seem well worth overcoming.The examples above cover push social media in so far as patient recruitment, retention and adherence are concerned. Pharmaceutical companies can influence patient behaviour to improve outcomes by means of social media. Whether this is constructing a more representative patient population by widening the net at the recruitment stage or maintaining active engagement to improve retention and compliance rates in order to improve outcomes in an investigational or a real-world setting, the role of social media is not to be underestimated. Yet it has even more to offer to the pharmaceutical industry.A perfect circlePatient engagement teams who are interested in real insights recognise the critical importance of pull social media techniques as well – the insights gleaned from social monitoring can help to inform and optimise a more effective push engagement activity. If you already know the typical patient journey for a particular indication, you are much better positioned to allocate your resources to a push strategy for recruitment, retention and adherence. What of the variables though? How does culture or language affect the linearity of that patient journey?Social Intelligence provides unique opportunities to align the international business goals of pharmaceutical organisations with patient needs. With a combination of technology which structured social data along the patient journey and virtual ethnography as a research methodology, this approach becomes scalable to gain global multilingual insights, and to inform strategy across the business and the drug development pipeline.One of the more controversial areas in which Social Listening plays a role is in monitoring adverse events that might otherwise go unreported. Teams must be trained and processes set up in accordance with regulations in regional territories. These teams must make clear distinctions between reportable AEs (which fulfil the four criteria for reporting) and non-reportable AEs (which will be the majority of cases). Some argue that the level of reportable AEs is negligible and that social media monitoring creates more problems than it solves; we find that this varies by region and indication.There are additional opportunities for feasibility teams to take advantage of social listening as part of a patient identification strategy, to determine where patients and investigators might be located."A key element of patient-centricity is accounting for linguistic and cultural nuances"One key question in all of this is how language and culture affect the outlook of patients on their diagnosis and the level of support they need – and also how it bears on their definition of their sense of wellbeing.An effective social monitoring strategy will provide insights such as:• How did the target groups define their sense of wellbeing? Does it line up with definitions of remission/management/treatment?• What kind of information do patients seek and where do they seek it? How can this help the organisation to develop materials to manage patient expectations in each region?• What are the characteristics of the patient journey for X indication in Y region? How do language and culture affect this data? This innovative approach can enable global pharmaceutical companies to make decisions about programme development quickly, cost effectively and with a global patient-centric lens. This approach is based on the notion that one size does not fit all patients when it comes to a social media strategy, and that a key element of patient-centricity is accounting for linguistic and cultural nuances, not only differences based on indication and region.
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Social media fails: healthcare marketers now ask "what next?"

Social media fails: healthcare marketers now ask "what next?" | Advertising technologies | Scoop.it
“Social media is not the powerful and persuasive marketing force many companies hoped they would be,” concludesGallup Inc., which on Monday is releasing a report that examines the subject. Gallup says 62% of the more than 18,000 U.S. consumers itpolled said social media had no influence on their buying decisions. Another 30% said it had some influence. U.S. companies spent $5.1 billion on social-media advertising in 2013, but Gallup says “consumers are highly adept at tuning out brand-related Facebook and Twitter content.” Just when we thought it was safe to use social media they push us back out!
Most consumers aren’t visiting social media sites to engage with brands — they are there to interact with people they know. According to Gallup research, the vast majority of consumers (94%) who use Facebook, Twitter, and other social networking channels do so to connect with family and friends. They are far less interested in learning about companies and/or their products, which implies that many companies have social media strategies in place that may be largely misdirected.Social media is not the powerful and persuasive marketing force many companies hoped they would be. When Gallup asked more than 18,000 consumers about the influence of social media on their buying decisions, 62% said they had no influence at all. Even among millennials (those born after 1980), whom companies often think of as the core social media audience, 48% said these sites were not a factor in their decision-making.And while many companies correlate the number of fans and followers with their social media success, Gallup alsoalso finds that these metrics can be misleading. Of the consumers who reported “liking” or following a company, 34% still said that social media had no influence on their purchasing behavior, while 53% said they had only some influence.
When compared with more traditional forms of social networking, social media initiatives may actually be the least effective method for influencing consumers’ buying decisions. Gallup research shows that consumers are much more likely to turn to friends, family members, and experts when seeking advice about companies, brands, products, or services. Company-sponsored Facebook pages and Twitter feeds have almost no persuasive power.What does this mean for pharma marketers? (1) Social media alone is not going to deliver on the promise of patients asking for an Rx. It is PART of an integrated marketing initiative to reach health searching consumers online.(2) Pharma, which is heavily ROI driven, needs to think of social media, not as a conversion platform, but rather a way to help patients get the information they need to make health care decisions.(3) DTC marketers should experiment with social media but have clear and concise objectives before allocating resources.

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