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Respect Sharks? More & More People are Starting to Realize just how Important they Are! Stop #Finning - via @VidarOceans

Respect Sharks? More & More People are Starting to Realize just how Important they Are! Stop #Finning  - via @VidarOceans | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
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Project Wild Thing – Reconnecting kids with nature – Project Wild Thing.

Project Wild Thing – Reconnecting kids with nature – Project Wild Thing. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it

Project Wild Thing is a film led movement to get more kids (and their folks!) outside and reconnecting with nature. The film is an ambitious, feature-length documentary that takes a funny and revealing look at a complex issue, the increasingly disparate connection between children and nature.

And Project Wild Thing is much more than a film, this is a growing movement of organisations and individuals who care deeply about the need for nature connected, free-range, roaming and outdoor playing kids in the 21st century. Hundreds of people have already committed huge amounts of time, energy, resources and money to help get the project where it is today. Which is really just the beginning.

The journey started in late 2010 with film-makers Green Lions exploring a film approach to an emerging issue coined ‘nature deficit disorder’ in kids. A collaboration formed with the National Trust who were also looking at the issue and through the Britdoc Foundation support for the development of the film and movement has gathered along the way from RSPB, Play England, Play Scotland, Play Wales, NHS Sustainable Development Unit, TFT, Woodland Trusts, AMV BBDO and Arla foods.

In summer 2012 Greenlions formed a collaboration with Good for Nothing, helping co-create the foundation of David Bond's nature marketing program, this was supported by generous contributions from the Do Lectures, TYF Adventures, Eden Project and Al Kennedy.

In the autumn of 2012 the Natural Childhood Summit hosted by the National Trust brought together hundreds of organisations to explore the challenges and issues more widely and collaboratively.

Project Wild Thing emerged and thousands of people have pledged to support the project a year before the film has launched. A Kickstarter campaign raised further funding from hundreds of awesome individuals around the world to finish the film production.

In January 2013 Swarm Partnership came on board with support from the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation and The Wild Network was hatched. The network is an open, growing collaborative group of organisations big and small seeking to tackle the many issues raised in the film and champion the wonders of being outside. An advisory group was established with the WildLife Trusts currently heading that up.

Phew!

Project Wild Thing and The Wild Network is a people powered movement, it's success will be down to the actions and the energy of this growing community.

If you want nature, wildness and free-range living for kids and adults to exist alongside an increasingly industrialised and technological society then join us and get involved in making that happen.

See you on the outside.

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Whales | The Science: Many of the sounds that you will hear in this project have been recorded during such behavioral response studies.

Whales | The Science: Many of the sounds that you will hear in this project have been recorded during such behavioral response studies. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it

Scientific American and the Zooniverse present Whales Calls.

 

Marine mammals are not the only sources of sound under water. Many natural phenomena, such as wind, rain, ice, lightning strikes can produce loud sound. We humans are a major contributor to the sound under water. There is a growing concern that sound generated by human activities can affect marine mammals. Human activities, such as shipping, searching for oil/gas using seismic surveys, explosions, military tactical sonars, and offshore constructions can produce loud sounds that affect animals, with potentially negative consequences.

Different international research projects have been set up to address several of these issues by studying the effect of sound on the behavior of marine mammals. The aim of such ‘behavioral response studies’ is to try to understand how and why marine mammals respond to various sound stimuli. These studies are badly needed in order to establish regulations and guidelines to mitigate the impact of man-made sound on marine life.

Many of the sounds that you will hear in this project have been recorded during such behavioral response studies. In these experiments, the effect of sonar sound on killer whales and pilot whales is studied. What we find is that killer whales and pilot whales respond to sonar sounds amongst others by changing the calls that they make.

The communication of killer whales and pilot whales is still poorly understood. While we know for some species the general context in which sounds are made (reproduction, contact calls for finding each other) many of the calls remain a mystery to us. To properly understand the implications of these responses, we need to know more about why and when animals make specific calls. This process is very challenging especially for vocal species such as killer whales and pilot whales.

The increasing size of current acoustic datasets and the large call repertoire make it very difficult for scientists to address these questions. A single person would take months to go through the data, and the outcome would still depend on a single persons’ interpretation.

For this reason we want to ask you to help us solve this problem, by categorizing the calls of killer whales and pilot whales that you find on this website. The dataset generated by this project will allow us to address interesting questions, such as:

How well do different judgements of volunteers agree, and how well can we categorize calls of vocal species such as pilot whales?How large is the call repertoire of pilot whales? (is size repertoire sign of intelligence?)Do the long and short finned pilot whales have different call repertoires (or ‘dialects’?)
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SEE Sharks | #SEEtheWILD

SEE Sharks | #SEEtheWILD | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
See sharks in the wild and support their protection with SEEtheWILD

 

SEE Sharks on these Conservation Tours

Galapagos Wildlife Adventure

Mexico: Swimming with Whale Sharks

Shark Conservation in Belize

Whale Sharks & Turtles of the Yucatan

 

Did You Know? Sharks, skates, and rays are collectively termed Elasmobranchs, which are a subclass of Chondrichthyes, or the cartilaginous fishes.The largest shark is the Whale shark which can reach up to 40 feet in length.Manta rays are currently hunted in Mexico, Indonesia, and the Philippines for meat. They have been so heavily hunted in Mexico that their populations have crashed there.50 shark species are listed as vulnerable,endangered, or critically endangered by the IUCN, but only the Great White, Whale, and Basking sharks are protected internationally by CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species).They have a skeleton made entirely of cartilage rather than bone as in other fish. In general, this group is slow growing, late maturing, and produce few young compared to other fish. 

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Scientists find brain region that helps you make up your mind | PsyPost.

Scientists find brain region that helps you make up your mind | PsyPost. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it

One of the smallest parts of the brain is getting a second look after new research suggests it plays a crucial role in decision making.

A University of British Columbia study published today in Nature Neuroscience says the lateral habenula, a region of the brain linked to depression and avoidance behaviors, has been largely misunderstood and may be integral in cost-benefit decisions.

“These findings clarify the brain processes involved in the important decisions that we make on a daily basis, from choosing between job offers to deciding which house or car to buy,” says Prof. Stan Floresco of UBC’s Dept. of Psychology and Brain Research Centre (BRC). “It also suggests that the scientific community has misunderstood the true functioning of this mysterious, but important, region of the brain.”

In the study, scientists trained lab rats to choose between a consistent small reward (one food pellet) or a potentially larger reward (four food pellets) that appeared sporadically. Like humans, the rats tended to choose larger rewards when costs—in this case, the amount of time they had to wait before receiving food–were low and preferred smaller rewards when such risks were higher.

Previous studies suggest that turning off the lateral habenula would cause rats to choose the larger, riskier reward more often, but that was not the case. Instead, the rats selected either option at random, no longer showing the ability to choose the best option for them.

The findings have important implications for depression treatment. “Deep brain stimulation – which is thought to inactivate the lateral habenula — has been reported to improve depressive symptoms in humans,” Floresco says. “But our findings suggest these improvements may not be because patients feel happier. They may simply no longer care as much about what is making them feel depressed.”

Background

Floresco, who conducted the study with PhD candidate Colin Stopper, says more investigation is needed to understand the complete brain functions involved in cost-benefit decision processes and related behaviour. A greater understanding of decision-making processes is also crucial, they say, because many psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, stimulant abuse and depression, are associated with impairments in these processes.

The lateral habenula is considered one of the oldest regions of the brain, evolution-wise.

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Researchers share Antarctica experience - Marshfield News-Herald

Researchers share Antarctica experience
Marshfield News-Herald
MARSHFIELD — Marshfield High School graduate Kyle Jero never dreamed his studies in physics would take him the most remote locations in the world: Antarctica.
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Ozone hole over Antarctica caused Africa's warming.

Ozone hole over Antarctica caused Africa's warming. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
The hole in the ozone layer likely caused domino effect of warming in southern Africa due to its influence over wind and weather system.
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Global Warming: Antarctica Welcomes Visitors - Guardian Express

Global Warming: Antarctica Welcomes Visitors - Guardian Express | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
Guardian Express
Global Warming: Antarctica Welcomes Visitors
Guardian Express
Antarctica is not on most people's bucket list as a tourist destination, but it is warming up to the idea of visitors.
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EUROPEAN UNION: Questions and Answers on the establishment of Marine Protected Areas in the Southern Ocean and Antarctica.

EUROPEAN UNION: Questions and Answers on the establishment of Marine Protected Areas in the Southern Ocean and Antarctica. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it

Two important science-based proposals for Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) will be discussed at the annual meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) on 23 October – 1 November 2013, in Hobart, Australia. The meeting is expected to adopt the two proposals - one by Australia, France and the European Union for a network of MPAs in East Antarctica and another one by New Zealand-United States on the Ross Sea region.

 

The EU and its partners want to give these vulnerable areas the protection they deserve - in recognition of their global ecological and scientific importance. In a joint declaration the EU, US, France, Australia and New Zealand today call for the adoption of the proposed marine protected areas at the CCAMLR annual meeting.

 

What is CCAMLR?

 

The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) is an international body established in 1982 with the objective of conserving Antarctic marine life. It has 25 Members and 11 countries that have acceded to the Convention. The European Union (EU) is a full member of this organisation, represented by the European Commission. The following EU Member States are also members of CCAMLR: Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

 

What is a Marine Protected Area (MPA)?

 

An MPA is a designated area where specific rules are adopted which aim at managing human activities, such as research or fishing, for the protection and conservation of marine biodiversity in that area. Thus, different rules apply in different MPAs depending on the management objectives chosen.

 

CCAMLR is considered a forerunner among Regional Fisheries Management Organisations (RFMOs) with its proactive attitude regarding conservation. In 2009, on the basis of an EU proposal, the first MPA established within CCAMLR convention area was the South Orkney Island Southern Shelf, where only scientific fishing is authorised.

 

What is the history of the EU proposal for an East Antarctic Representative System of Marine Protected Areas?

 

The initial proposal was developed by Australia, France and the EU in 2010 using extensive scientific evidence. In 2011 it was presented to CCAMLR's Scientific Committee which endorsed it and established that it contained the best scientific evidence available.

 

The proposal was then submitted for adoption to the 2012 CCAMLR Annual Meeting, where no consensus was reached. Its importance was further underlined when CCAMLR Members agreed to hold a Special Meeting in Germany in July 2013 to discuss the issue, although again no consensus was found.

 

What is the objective of this proposal?

 

The objective is to declare seven conservation zones in Eastern Antarctica in order to establish a system which is representative for all biogeographic areas and based on the best scientific evidence available. The selected areas are home to a distinctive water flora and fauna. A wide range of sea marine mammals, penguins and other seabirds find important feeding grounds here. Other areas serve as nursery grounds of Antarctic krill, Antarctic toothfish and Antarctic silverfish.

 

The proposed MPAs have an important role to play in research in order to better understand the effects of fishing outside the MPAs as well as for climate change related research. The total surface of the proposed MPAs is approximately 1.63 million square kilometres (slightly less than half the size of the territory of the EU).

 

Why are MPAs important?

 

Nature conservation and fisheries management are the main reasons why MPAs are established.

 

The use of MPAs for conservation has increased in parallel with the growing global recognition of the need to safeguard the marine environment. According to FAO, protected areas have a long history and predate the MPA concept by several decades. Measures such as area and time restrictions for protection of a component of a fish stock or community, e.g. adult spawning grounds or juvenile nursery areas, are considered types of MPA. With the increasing trend of applying an ecosystem based approach to fisheries, MPAs with broader combined objectives for ecosystem management are likely to become more commonplace.

 

Governments made a commitment at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002 to create a representative network of MPAs by 2012. In 2010, the Conference of the Parties of the Convention of Biodiversity adopted its Aichi Targets relating to biodiversity which included the establishment of MPAs. The aim was to ensure that by 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas of particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services would be conserved through effectively and equitably managed marine protected areas. In 2012, the global community confirmed this goal at Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development.

 

What activities are allowed in MPAs?

 

The MPAs are governed by the principle of ‘multiple use’: activities that do not represent a threat to the values of conservation and research of the MPAs can be approved by the CCAMLR Commission. When reviewing proposed activities, CCAMLR has to take full account of the recommendations and advice of the Scientific Committee.

 

Is there reason for optimism?

 

For more than 30 years CCAMLR has been a leading force in marine conservation. The EU is confident that CCAMLR can regain its visionary political leadership and establish a network of MPAs in the Southern Ocean. The time has come to work together, constructively and with determination towards the adoption of MPAs.

See also:

 

For more information and maps of the proposed areas:

http://www.antarctica.gov.au/law-and-treaty/ccamlr/marine-protected-areas

 

Commissioner Maria Damanaki's announcement on Joint Statement on Marine Protected Areas in Antarctica: MEMO/13/901

 

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About the World Cetacean Alliance |

About the World Cetacean Alliance | | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it

At the 1st World Whale Conference, 26-27 October 2012, delegates agreed that a new coalition should be formed to effectively protect the world’s cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) from the many and varied threats that they face. This coalition will be a partnership of NGOs, whale and dolphin watching businesses, and passionate individuals, all prepared to work together and shout louder on behalf of cetaceans than ever before. So why do we need it?

 

Vulnerable species becoming extinct, common species rapidly becoming uncommon, and critical habitats disappearing fast” – sounds familiar? It’s time for a new global alliance if we are to effectively protect cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) from the many and varied threats that they face. This new organisation will be a partnership of NGOs, whale and dolphin watching businesses, and passionate individuals, all prepared to work together, faster and louder on behalf of cetaceans than ever before.

The community of people with an interest in protecting cetaceans is one of the largest for any group of animals in the world. According to statistics sourced from both IFAW and Planet Whale it includes over 3,300 whale and dolphin watching businesses, 150 NGOs, and 13 million people going whale watching every year.

Joined together this community has the potential to be enormously powerful and influential; to run global campaigns with the backing of millions of people, to target specific issues with enough support to achieve rapid change, to pull in significant new funding, to reach more of the public than ever before, and to ensure the success and growth of every member organisation.

On 8th June 2013, on World Oceans Day, 22 partners from 10 countries launched the World Cetacean Alliance to bring the community together.

Planet Whale does not intend to lead this new organisation. Planet Whale facilitates partnerships and community engagement projects around the world to achieve positive change for cetaceans and their habitats. By facilitating new partnerships Planet Whale empowers other individuals and organisations to be more effective through collaboration.

Successes include the Responsible Whale Watch Partnership, WhaleFest, and the World Whale Conference. With advice from Birdlife International, the world’s largest partnership of conservation organisations, Planet Whale is facilitating the World Cetacean Alliance.

VISION

The World Cetacean Alliance will represent a new and powerful global community willing to work together to protect whales, dolphins, and porpoises (collectively known as cetaceans), and their habitats.

We will stand by the following principles:

The Alliance will actively seek recognition and influence as the largest international network of experts and advocates for cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises).Our emphasis will be to involve the widest possible stakeholder community, and especially the general public, in all of our agreed strategies, policies and programmes; globally, regionally, and locally. We believe everybody deserves a say in the important decisions that affect whales and dolphins.We will seek innovative and positive solutions to the issues affecting cetaceans by adopting an inclusive, solutions-driven approach at all times.As the global Partnership empowered to speak with one voice to protect cetaceans and their habitats, we recognise the value of collaboration and respect the ideas and principles of all of the Partners as equals.

 

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Vidar Oceanus (VidarOceans) on Twitter

Vidar Oceanus (VidarOceans) on Twitter | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
The latest from Vidar Oceanus (@VidarOceans). One day, Humankind will learn that of all the animals in the World we were the destroyers of our one & only Planet! What Intelligence.
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New snorkelling trips launched to Antarctica - Telegraph.co.uk

New snorkelling trips launched to Antarctica - Telegraph.co.uk | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
Telegraph.co.uk
New snorkelling trips launched to Antarctica
Telegraph.co.uk
The operator is running a number of Antarctica-bound expeditions in February and March next year where the snorkelling outings will be available.
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CherryPepper Magazine Vegan - The Vegan Magazine

CherryPepper Magazine Vegan - The Vegan Magazine | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
CherryPepper Magazine Vegan. Le site web tout en svg de la revue vegane CherryPepper, une revue en français et en anglais. Pour les vegans, les vegetariens et toute personne qui veut être plus éthique
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Dinosaur Quiz: Animal Planet.

Dinosaur Quiz: Animal Planet. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
Dinosaurs disappeared from the earth around 60 million years ago, but many of their ancestors are still around. Take this dinosaur quiz to learn more.

 

About 60 million years ago, something happened to wipe dinosaurs off the face of the Earth. These creatures dominated the landscape far longer than humans have been around, but many mysteries remain about their appearance, physiology and eventual extinction. So which of today's animals evolved from dinosaurs?

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Sea #Turtle Conservation Travel.

Sea #Turtle Conservation Travel. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
SEE Turtles offers sea turtle conservation travel opportunities for families, volunteers, and anyone looking to leave a positive impact.

 

SEA TURTLE CONSERVATION TRAVEL

 

 

 

From leatherbacks to loggerheads, six of the seven species of sea turtles that swim the oceans are threatened or endangered. SEE Turtles connects travelers and volunteers to turtle hotspots and responsible tour operators.

 

Sea Turtle Conservation Expeditions

    Costa Rica

       Leatherback Sea Turtle Volunteer Vacation

       Cocos Island Shark & Turtle Research

    Mexico

       Whale Watching & Turtle Research

       Baja Kayaking & Turtle Research

       Yucatan Turtle Volunteer Program

       Whale Sharks & Turtles of the Yucatan

    Nicaragua

       Cloud Forests, Reefs, & Sea Turtles

       Nicaragua's Wild Side

       Nicaragua Wildlife Adventure

    El Salvador

       Sea Turtles & Community Development

    Ecuador

       Galapagos Wildlife Adventure

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Newfound Giant Dinosaur Ruled Before T. Rex.

Newfound Giant Dinosaur Ruled Before T. Rex. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it

Tyrannosaurs reign as the most famous of all meat-eating dinosaurs. But they didn't always dominate, suggests the newly discovered bones of a massive carnivorous dinosaur that lived 98 million years ago.

Named Siats meekerorum (pronounced "See-atch"), the dinosaur discovered in eastern Utah by paleontologists was a previously unknown "apex," or top, predator that ruled long before North America's tyrannosaurs came to power. (See also: "Smallest Meat-Eating Dinosaur Discovered in North America.")

In the Nature Communications study published today, Lindsay Zanno of North Carolina State University and Peter Makovicky of Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History add to our knowledge of gigantic dinosaur predators prior to the days of Tyrannosaurus rex, which lived some 67 million years ago.

At full size, the two-legged carnivore may have weighed more than four tons and stretched nearly the length of a school bus.

The discoverers report that the dinosaur's first (or genus) name is a tribute to its predatory prowess. In the legends of Utah's native Ute tribe, "Siats" is the name of a voracious monster.

Black Bone Discovery

Zanno knew she had discovered a significant dinosaur as soon as she happened across a collection of black bone fragments sitting on the surface of eastern Utah's Cedar Mountain Formation.

Remains of large carnivorous dinosaurs are rare in these rocks. "We had no idea how much would be in the ground," Zanno says, "but we were stoked because we knew immediately we had a larger theropod and that it was going to fill in a huge gap in our understanding of theropod evolution on the continent."

The discovery team recovered a partial skeleton including vertebrae, parts of the hip, the lower leg, and toes.

At first, Zanno says, she expected that Siats would be something like the huge, sail-backed carnivore Acrocanthosaurus, but the new dinosaur turned out to be something else. Distinctive anatomic features on the bones mark Siats as a newly recognized type of predator called a neovenatorid, cousins of the earlier, well-known Allosaurus.

Similar to a previously discovered dinosaur called Neovenator, Siatswould have sported a pointier, less blocky head than the big tyrannosaurs, and had relatively long, three-clawed arms, rather than short ones like those made famous by T. rex.

Incomplete Skeleton

Since the newly discovered dinosaur's known skeleton is incomplete and is from a juvenile, Siats' exact size at adulthood isn't entirely clear.

From estimates based on comparisons with more complete skeletons of other dinosaurs, Zanno says that "a juvenile Siats would have been, at minimum, about 30 feet long and around 9,000 pounds."

That's an impressive size that "still puts juvenile Siats as the third largest predator ever discovered in North America," Zanno says. The fact that the animal was not yet fully mature raises the likelihood that the adults were even bigger.

"Future material may reveal Siats grew up to be one of the biggest predators known around the globe," Zanno says.

Keeping Tyrannosaurs Down

The size of Siats is only part of the dinosaur's significance. "In the rock beds that contain the colossal bones of Siats, we also find the teeth of relatively tiny tyrannosaurs about the size of a large dog," Zanno says.

Early tyrannosaurs lived in the shadow of gigantic allosaurid carnivores like Siats. It was only after dinosaurs such as Siats disappeared, Zanno says, "that tyrannosaurs were free to evolve into the giant predators we know and love today."

University of Oxford paleontologist Roger Benson, who first recognized neovenatorids with colleagues in a 2010 study, agrees that Siats helps fill in a missing chapter in predatory dinosaur history.

Until now, there were "25 million years of missing data," Benson says, between allosaurid giants like Acrocanthosaurus and North America's huge tyrannosaurs.

With Siats at 98 million years old, he adds, the dinosaur "shows us that allosaurids stayed on top for at least another 10 million years." Exactly when and why dinosaurs like Siats gave way to the tyrannosaurs, however, relies on future Cretaceous finds from this final era of the Age of Dinosaurs.

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Aurora Australis – ship webcam — Australian Antarctic Division

Aurora Australis – ship webcam — Australian Antarctic Division | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
Ship cam is back! The Aurora Australis departs for Davis station, Antarctica, at 5pm today http://t.co/cW3ZgGeFBw http://t.co/6AjVqzYLOk
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Lake Vostok mysteries: Biologists find over 3,500 life forms in isolated Antarctic basin.

Lake Vostok mysteries: Biologists find over 3,500 life forms in isolated Antarctic basin. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it

Scientists have discovered more than 3,500 unique gene sequences in Lake Vostok – the underground Antarctic water reservoir isolated from the outside world for 15 million years – revealing a complex ecosystem far beyond anything they could have expected.

"The bounds on what is habitable and what is not are changing," said Scott Rogers, Bowling Green State University professor of biological sciences, who led a genetic study of the contents of half a liter of water brought back from the lake after it was drilled by Russian scientists last year. 

"We found much more complexity than anyone thought," Rogers said. "It really shows the tenacity of life, and how organisms can survive in places where a couple dozen years ago we thought nothing could survive." 

There are few places on Earth more hostile to life forms than Lake Vostok, the largest subglacial lake in the Antarctic, and initially Rogers believed that the water from it may have been completely sterile. 

Water is located 4,000 meters below the ice, which completely blocks sunlight, and creates huge pressure on the liquid. It is also literally located in the coldest place on Earth: the world’s lowest temperature of -89.2C was recorded at Vostok Station above the reservoir.

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Govt. shutdown ices out USF scientists cruising to Antarctica - ABC Action News.

Govt. shutdown ices out USF scientists cruising to Antarctica - ABC Action News. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
ABC Action News
Govt. shutdown ices out USF scientists cruising to Antarctica
ABC Action News
The USF scientist has been waiting for a decade to slip back into the broken ice sheets of east Antarctica.
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Antarctica: No Ordinary Place, No Ordinary Assignment - PR Newswire (press release)

Antarctica: No Ordinary Place, No Ordinary Assignment
PR Newswire (press release)
AUCKLAND, New Zealand, Oct.
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Pandora's Promise.

Pandora's Promise. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it

Impact Partners, in association with Vulcan Productions and CNN Films, present PANDORA’S PROMISE, the groundbreaking new film by Academy-Award®-nominated director Robert Stone. The atomic bomb and meltdowns like Fukushima have made nuclear power synonymous with global disaster. But what if we’ve got nuclear power wrong? An audience favorite at the Sundance Film Festival, PANDORA’S PROMISE asks whether the one technology we fear most could save our planet from a climate catastrophe, while providing the energy needed to lift billions of people in the developing world out of poverty. In his controversial new film, Stone tells the intensely personal stories of environmentalists and energy experts who have undergone a radical conversion from being fiercely anti to strongly pro-nuclear energy, risking their careers and reputations in the process. Stone exposes this controversy within the environmental movement head-on with stories of defection by heavy weights including Stewart Brand, Richard Rhodes, Gwyneth Cravens, Mark Lynas and Michael Shellenberger. Undaunted and fearlessly independent, PANDORA’S PROMISE is a landmark work that is forever changing the conversation about the myths and science behind this deeply emotional and polarizing issue.

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@VidarOceans Yes, I do commit so called breach of the peace when i see #Shark #fin #soup ordered in a restaurant & always will! #SavetheSharks

@VidarOceans Yes, I do commit so called breach of the peace when i see #Shark #fin #soup ordered in a restaurant & always will! #SavetheSharks | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it
@VidarOceans Yes, I do commit so called breach of the peace when i see #Shark #fin #soup ordered in a restaurant & always will! #SavetheSharks — Vidar Oceanus Maybe one day, Humankind will learn that of all the animals in the World we were the destroyers of our one & only Planet! 
Titan Exploration Industries: Wildlife campaigners of the World.
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Antarctica's underwater ice loss is more significant than scientists thought - Science Recorder.

Antarctica's underwater ice loss is more significant than scientists thought - Science Recorder. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it

Antarctica’s ice shelves have an “Achilles’ heel,” and it’s the melting that’s taking place beneath the surface, not on the surface, according to an international climate study newly published in the journal Nature Climate Change. The study urges scientists to pay more attention to sub-shelf melting, which in some glaciers accounts for 90% of the continent’s ongoing annual ice loss.

Jonathan Bamber, a professor with the University of Bristol’s School of Geographical Sciences, coauthored the study with colleagues at Utrecht University and the University of California. The researchers relied on a combination of satellite data and computer-model simulations to track the present and future melting that the Antarctic glaciers’ surfaces and undersides are undergoing. The simulations repeatedly showed that what’s going on beneath the surface is as important as—if not more important than—any ice loss that scientists have been witnessing taking place aboveground.

This underwater ice loss affects some ice shelves more than others. Bramber and his colleagues can already pinpoint some of the more affected ice shelves by looking at the current extent of their ice loss. Further research may quantify the underwater melt levels of many more.

That Antarctica is losing ice is certainly not news to climate scientists. Topographic data collected over the last few decades has made clear that surface-level iceberg production and melting has been causing extended trends of continental ice shrinkage in much of the continent.

That shrinkage amounted to about 70 gigatons of the continent’s land ice a year from 1992 through 2011. The continent’s sea ice made some shrinkages in many areas, as well, coupled with a few smaller increases in a few others as a direct result of the melting. This led to some slight increases in a few areas of the continent’s sea ice—increases that, while too small to compensate for the larger losses, still fueled some false claims by a few climate-change skeptics that “Antarctica’s ice is expanding.”

Overall ice loss is not only happening, but there is even more of it taking place sub-surface than researchers may have thought, Bramber and his colleagues conclude. This challenges conventional thinking in that researchers over the last few decades have primarily focused on the surface-level processes of icebergs forming and breaking away from the main ice shelves. This, they believed, was the main driver of long-term ice loss.

Bramber and his colleagues encourage scientists to reconsider. Recognizing the role of subsurface melting, which in many cases may be far larger than that of iceberg breakage, may be critical to a more precise understanding of how ice sheets may interact with oceans and the changing climate in the decades to come.

 

 
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Nine Insane (But True) Penguin Facts.

Nine Insane (But True) Penguin Facts. | #Adventurewithus | Scoop.it

 


The following article was written by Melinda McKee.


Who doesn't love penguins? These fashionable and faithful beings are remarkable in so many ways! The following are nine things that you may or may not know about penguins:


Penguins can't fly. OK, so maybe you knew this one. But isn't it cool that evolution has adapted these tuxedo-wearing friends' wings into miniature fins suited for swimming at great speeds?    

Are you a penguin expert? Find out here.
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