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Advances in the Genomics of Botany
New discoveries and their implications.
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DSM and Monsanto to commercialize soybean oil rich in omega-3 SDA. But will anti-GMO sentiment hinder its progress? - FoodNavigator (2013)

DSM and Monsanto to commercialize soybean oil rich in omega-3 SDA. But will anti-GMO sentiment hinder its progress? - FoodNavigator (2013) | Advances in the Genomics of Botany | Scoop.it

Monsanto has joined forces with DSM to commercialize a genetically engineered soybean oil rich in the omega-3 fatty acid SDA (stearidonic acid) that can offer a more cost-effective means of adding omega-3s to foods without the flavor, stability and shelf-life issues associated with fish oil.

 

While there are other plant-based sources of omega-3s such as flaxseed, they contain ALA... which our bodies are not very good at converting into EPA and DHA... the omega-3s most associated with cardiovascular health.

 

By contrast, we are much more efficient at converting SDA into EPA, said Monsanto, which developed the SDA-rich beans by inserting genes from yeast and an (unidentified) plant, Federico Tripodi, Monsanto SDA program director, told FoodNavigator-USA... 

 

“SDA omega-3 soybean oil would provide a sustainable way for consumers to increase their intake of omega-3 fatty acids that help maintain heart health. Food companies are looking for solutions to deliver the benefits of longer chain omega-3s while maintaining flavor over the shelf-life of the product.” ...

 

DSM: GM technology potentially offers substantial benefits in the areas of health, nutrition and the environment.

 

But will the accelerating push for GMO labeling and the growing anti-GMO sentiment expressed by some influential retailers... cloud the future for the oil? Not if people focus on the benefits... “We believe there is a real need for vegetarian and sustainable sources of long chain omega-3s... the use of this technology can help in supporting human health and in making the world more sustainable...

 

Monsanto has also “completed the key regulatory processes in the US, Canada and Mexico and has also made submissions for import approval in key export markets” ...


Via Alexander J. Stein
Jack's insight:

Although it's a shame those opposing GMO's are blocking the progress of potentially lifechanging advances in incorporating new nutrients into common staples for people around the world. The soybean especially and the controversy over owning the genetics to the pesticide immune seed leads me to believe it is acceptable to be skeptical of these technologies.

 

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Jack's comment, April 10, 2013 3:42 PM
My thoughts: It is crucial to find a manner of implicating these nutrients into the population, while still protecting the genetics of the natural soybeans. As these beans would require more nutrients in their soil, further research onto how farm the genetically altered beans should be done, and trials should be implicated in areas in poverty .
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KNOX2 Genes Regulate the Haploid-to-Diploid Morphological Transition in Land Plants

KNOX2 Genes Regulate the Haploid-to-Diploid Morphological Transition in Land Plants | Advances in the Genomics of Botany | Scoop.it

Unlike animals, land plants undergo an alternation of generations, producing multicellular bodies in both haploid (1n: gametophyte) and diploid (2n: sporophyte) generations. Plant body plans in each generation are regulated by distinct developmental programs initiated at either meiosis or fertilization, respectively. In mosses, the haploid gametophyte generation is dominant, whereas in vascular plants—including ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms—the diploid sporophyte generation is dominant. Deletion of the class 2 KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX2) transcription factors in the moss Physcomitrella patens results in the development of gametophyte bodies from diploid embryos without meiosis. Thus, KNOX2 acts to prevent the haploid-specific body plan from developing in the diploid plant body, indicating a critical role for the evolution of KNOX2 in establishing an alternation of generations in land plants


Via Jean-Pierre Zryd
Jack's insight:

This is fascinating, understanding how plant species form and stabilize into what they are is crucial into utilizing the potential of the Genomics of Botany to help our world in the future.

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Jack's comment, April 8, 2013 3:48 PM
My thoughts - I hadn't any idea that land plants alternate between haplodid and diploid states stabilizing (as a species) in the one that is more successful in the given scenario. Given this information several questions are raised, how would different versions (haploid and diploid) of these plants fare in the mapping of their genetics, and how would mapping these same (but different) genetics round our view on the genetics of plants overall?
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PLOS ONE: Effect of Stacked Insecticidal Cry Proteins from Maize Pollen on Nurse Bees (Apis mellifera carnica) and Their Gut Bacteria

PLOS ONE: Effect of Stacked Insecticidal Cry Proteins from Maize Pollen on Nurse Bees (Apis mellifera carnica) and Their Gut Bacteria | Advances in the Genomics of Botany | Scoop.it

Honey bee pollination is a key ecosystem service to nature and agriculture. However, biosafety research on genetically modified crops rarely considers effects on nurse bees from intact colonies, even though they receive and primarily process the largest amount of pollen. The objective of this study was to analyze the response of nurse bees and their gut bacteria to pollen from Bt maize expressing three different insecticidal Cry proteins (Cry1A.105, Cry2Ab2, and Cry3Bb1). Naturally Cry proteins are produced by bacteria (Bacillus thuringiensis). Colonies of Apis mellifera carnica were kept during anthesis in flight cages on field plots with the Bt maize, two different conventionally bred maize varieties, and without cages, 1-km outside of the experimental maize field to allow ad libitum foraging to mixed pollen sources. During their 10-days life span, the consumption of Bt maize pollen had no effect on their survival rate, body weight and rates of pollen digestion compared to the conventional maize varieties. As indicated by ELISA-quantification of Cry1A.105 and Cry3Bb1, more than 98% of the recombinant proteins were degraded. Bacterial population sizes in the gut were not affected by the genetic modification. Bt-maize, conventional varieties and mixed pollen sources selected for significantly different bacterial communities which were, however, composed of the same dominant members, including Proteobacteria in the midgut and Lactobacillus sp. and Bifidobacterium sp. in the hindgut. Surprisingly, Cry proteins from natural sources, most likely B. thuringiensis, were detected in bees with no exposure to Bt maize. The natural occurrence of Cry proteins and the lack of detectable effects on nurse bees and their gut bacteria give no indication for harmful effects of this Bt maize on nurse honey bees.


Via Jean-Pierre Zryd
Jack's insight:

It struck me as surprising that the bulk of bacteria's responsible for digesting the bee's pollen was still in tact. But i would say it is important to first study the effects of each bacteria in the digestive tract of the bees to truly evaluate if the differences in the hindgut can be rendered severe or not to the nurse bees health.

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