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Advancement of Teaching & Learning
education policy, emerging movements from pre K to college...
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My "Academy Awards" for Best Educational Documentaries

My "Academy Awards" for Best Educational Documentaries | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
I love movies and have always envied Academy Award voters. So here's my chance! I am giving out my own Edutopia version of the 2014 Academy Awards for Educational Documentaries.

And since this is th
Linda Alexander's insight:

Interesting list!

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When May I Shoot a Student?

When May I Shoot a Student? | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Modest questions about an Idaho bill allowing guns on campus.
Linda Alexander's insight:

This really needs to be shared!

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Eating disorders prevalent on college campuses, but CWRU offers help

Eating disorders prevalent on college campuses, but CWRU offers help | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
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The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

 

Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products.

Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work.

 

After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.

 


Via Gust MEES, Terheck, juandoming
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Marco Pozzi's curator insight, February 23, 11:27 AM

Molto interessante!!

Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, February 23, 11:10 PM

from hybridpedagogy.com a new online journal. 

Leah Lesley Christensen's curator insight, February 28, 2:20 AM

Yes, I agree !

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ED Blog Spotlights Current Education Transformations | New from Dept. of Education

ED Blog Spotlights Current Education Transformations |  New from Dept. of Education | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
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Common Core Curriculum Now Has Critics on the Left

Common Core Curriculum Now Has Critics on the Left | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
The newest chorus of complaints about the common learning standards is coming from one of their earliest champions: New York State.
Linda Alexander's insight:

It appears that many of the issues relate to the way the roll-out is being managed in NY (poorly) and the reality of lower scores.  

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Match-ing Students to Excellent Tutors | Pioneer Institute

Match-ing Students to Excellent Tutors | Pioneer Institute | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
BOSTON - “High-dosage” tutoring of the kind pioneered at Match Education's charter schools in Boston should be a central component of school and district turnaround efforts, schools and districts that adopt the model should be given ...
Linda Alexander's insight:

Within Metro-Phoenix, I am part of a tutoring program sponsored by OASIS. At my own neighborhood elementary school, there are 50 community volunteers that tutor students each week.  The tutors make an enormous contribution in terms of supporting schools with high student-teacher ratios, as in Phoenix, and providing another set of eyes and ears to the very children who desire the most attention.  There is enormous value in formally organized community tutoring programs. This includes proper training, developing a sense of community among the tutors, and the necessary follow-through and support at the district level. (Oh, and federal background checks are mandatory...)

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The benefits—and limits—of decision models | McKinsey & Company

The benefits—and limits—of decision models | McKinsey & Company | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Big data and models help overcome biases that cloud judgment, but many executive decisions also require bold action inspired by self-confidence. Here’s how to take charge in a clear-headed way. A McKinsey Quarterly article.
Linda Alexander's insight:

There is probably no group of folks more prone to data-based decisions these days than are educators.  Therefore, this article applies equally to school administrators who are quite often overwhelmed with information and all the various data tools . 

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Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States

Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it

"The graph and tables on this page attempt to show how the urban hierarchy of the United States has developed over time. The statistic used here is the population of the metropolitan area (contiguous urbanized area surrounding a central city), not the population of an individual city. Metropolitan area population is much more useful than city population as an indicator of the size and importance of a city, since the official boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary and often do not include vast suburban areas. For example, in 2000 San Antonio was the 10th largest city in the U.S., larger than Boston or San Francisco, but its Metro Area was only ranked about 30th. The same thing was happening even back in 1790: New York was the biggest single city, but Philadelphia plus its suburbs of Northern Liberties and Southwark made it the biggest metro area."


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, January 30, 2:56 PM

While the Northeast has typically been the ringleader for population centers in America, rising costs of living and population density has been pushing people out into other parts of the country. Along with that, discoveries of natural resources westward help incentivize people to move. Evidenced by the rise of San Fransisco, the settling of Alaska, the oil rich fields of West Texas, and the fertile lands of the mid-west to name a few. While these are early examples from the beginnings of America, even today we find these same reasons for the push out of the Northeast. With the new discoveries of resources in the Dakotas and the cost of living being so much cheaper in the South and especially in the major cities of Texas, where a house with a yard can cost half of what it does here in Rhode Island minus the lawn. The usefulness of a city and region plays a role in its population rise or decline as well. Take for example, Newport, RI in 1810 was listed as #13 being that it was a major transportation and shipping hub. Today, I would be very surprised if it was in the top 150. As the country expanded and other ports of entry were established, economic forces adapted. Sometimes this was for the better, such as the port of Los Angeles or for the worse, such as Detroit’s decline. Advances in technology make communication and transportation incredibly efficient and what was at one a cultural identity for some places to be a hub of manufacturing or shipping or what have you now become a global enterprise with perhaps a call center in India, a factory in Mexico, and a global HQ in Delaware. Because of Globalization, no longer does one metropolis have to be king of all and instead, a small town can provide tax breaks for a technology company even though none of the real production gets done in that locale due to cheap labor being half way across the world. People will move according to their needs and accessibility to those needs, and if what they need to survive are no longer accessible in location A, then they will move to location B, C, or X - if need be.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 11:29 AM

This information is a helpful illustrator for someone who knows about the geography and history of the United States.  It is important to note the use of "metropolitan populations" rather than "city populations" within particular city borders; as the creator states, "boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary".  In other words, the information that can be given from a "city" do not tell the whole story.  Metropolitan areas, even if spanning out of city borders, share similar local culture dynamics, industry, and infrastructure as the core city.  If one was to just examine the cities and not the entire metropolitan areas of the Northeast Megalopolis, they would be missing a huge part of the puzzle. Depending on the time period, the demanded resources, and the available technologies heavily influence how metropoloitan areas work, grow, and interact with others.   This can be seen in the charts and tables.  For example, the availability of the automobile and other transportation methods deeply affected how people and industry move and how metropolitan areas influence and interact with one another.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 10:26 AM

Comparing and contrasting numbers is a huge part of todays world. Looking at this chart, it indicates the size of the population of the whole metropolitan area. The difference in size of cities and of areas differs greatly and the examples provided can show how the area of a city is different that its Metro Area ranking.

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The Student-Led Backlash Against New Orleans's Charter Schools

The Student-Led Backlash Against New Orleans's Charter Schools | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it

Collegiate Academies is seen by many as the crown jewel of the New Orleans charter school system, which is itself believed to be a national model for urban education. The charter operator’s flagship school, Sci Academy, boasts the best test scores of any open-enrollment high school in the city’s Recovery School District. In 2010, Oprah cut the school a $1 million check.

But this past November, a chain of events started that calls into question whether Collegiate Academies—and other New Orleans charters with similar models—will be able to maintain their success long-term.

First, students at Joseph S. Clark Preparatory High School, another New Orleans school, staged a sit-in after a beloved teacher was abruptly fired. 

Days later, almost 100 students at two Collegiate Academies schools walked out. The next day, about 20 of them walked out again and staged a protest in front of their schools. They said they wanted to draw attention to what they believe are unfair discipline policies. The following month, students rallied at a nearby park after school, then walked to a school board meeting where they attempted to present the board with a list of grievances that ranged from academics ("We have no textbooks to review when we study") to discipline ("We get disciplined for anything and everything") to food service ("We want hot meals and healthy food with taste").

What’s going on? Why the backlash against schools that are trying (and in many cases succeeding) to improve education in New Orleans? 


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Tiger Mom & Hubby's New Book: Finds 'unlikely traits' explain success of various groups | Inside Higher Ed

Tiger Mom & Hubby's New Book: Finds 'unlikely traits' explain success of various groups | Inside Higher Ed | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Linda Alexander's insight:

Yale professor Amy Chu, aka The Tiger Mom, and her Yale professor hubby have released a new book that has already sparked plenty of attention.  They load this book with tons of stats to prove a somewhat controversial point--that underlying feelings of superiority coupled with impulse control, grit, are the key traits to academic achievement for certain ethnic and cultural groups of people. 

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Pluck and Tenacity: How five private schools in Ohio have adapted to vouchers

Pluck and Tenacity: How five private schools in Ohio have adapted to vouchers | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
 

Roughly 30,000 kids in Ohio take advantage of a publicly funded voucher (or “scholarship”). But as students flee public schools for private ones, how does life change for the private schools that take voucher kids? Can private schools coexist with a publicly-funded voucher program? Can they adapt as they educate more students from disadvantaged backgrounds?
Linda Alexander's insight:

St. Martins de Porres and other voucher examples...

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Pew Research on Reading: Stagnant Literacy Rates & What We Read Not Encouraging

Pew Research on Reading:  Stagnant Literacy Rates & What We Read Not Encouraging | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Those numbers sound way more alarming than they actually are. The bigger problem: the stagnant literacy rate.

Via Ken Morrison
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"If we are what we read, then Americans are wimpy, religious, ambitious, self-improving, and patriotic."  It's depressing that 14%  of the population can’t read and that 24 % of adults didn’t read a single book last year…and the list of what we did read is not very encouraging.  

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Ken Morrison's curator insight, February 2, 7:04 AM

I find this to be disgusting.  There is also a list of the books that we actually did read last year.

Lou Salza's curator insight, February 5, 5:59 PM

This research is damning! We are now in our second or third generation of failing to teach reading to children. Those children we failed in the past are now having children and we continue to make make saber rattling laws that blame parents and children, protect ineffective programs, and teacher's right's over learner's rights. --Lou

Excerpt:

"....However, the most critical measure of our reading culture is not necessarily the amount read, in whatever format, but the ability to read. Last April, the United States Department of Education and the National Institute of Literacy found that 32 million Americans, or about 14 percent of the population, cannot read, while almost a quarter of American adults read below a fifth-grade level. In fact, literacy rates in America haven’t risen much in two decades.

Those sobering figures complicate whatever judgments we might make about last week’s Pew study. Our reading habits reflect not only our choices, but also our abilities. More and more, they also reflect our access. Acquiring books, new or used, may seem like an inexpensive venture for most, but for others the cost is prohibitive. The free alternatives, public libraries, are chronically underfunded: local branches are closing, while opening hours and staff are increasingly limited. To assume that the 24 percent of adults who did not read a single book last year chose to do so is to ignore the likelihood that some of those surveyed cannot read or could not access a book...."

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Computer Science: Not Just an Elective Anymore (& influence of hour of code)

Computer Science: Not Just an Elective Anymore (& influence of hour of code) | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
The subject is getting a fresh look from state and local policymakers, with many pushing measures to expand access to computing courses.
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Corporate school reform by the numbers:... - Rethinking Schools | Facebook

Corporate school reform by the numbers: New York principal Carol Burris "looks at irrefutable data to show that the test-based reforms are taking public...
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Six-year-old schoolboy suspended for having Mini Cheddars in his lunchbox has now been expelled

Six-year-old schoolboy suspended for having Mini Cheddars in his lunchbox has now been expelled | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
A six-year-old boy suspended for having a packet of Mini Cheddars in his lunchbox has now been expelled from school. (This is getting totally out of hand!! Parents should be speaking up and heading to the schools in droves!
Linda Alexander's insight:

A ridiculous example  of a UK school believing their institutional stature beyond reproach and parental guidance absolute.  And here in the US  some still believe french fries are appropriate "vegetables" for public school lunches...!

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School teacher holds class via tablet as she sits in Pa. Turnpike gridlock

School teacher holds class via tablet as she sits in Pa. Turnpike gridlock | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Hun School history teacher Lynn McNulty did not let a series of chain-reaction car crashes and a miles-long traffic jam keep her from school another day.
Linda Alexander's insight:

This is one for the road--so to speak!  

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Budget cut blues: How special ed students suffer due to federal spending cuts [infographic]

Budget cut blues: How special ed students suffer due to federal spending cuts [infographic] | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Talk to any teacher, and they'll tell you they've seen the demand for special education services rise in recent years, but, unfortunately, it's an area that's feeling a serious pinch thanks to the ...
Linda Alexander's insight:

Ugh!!!  The more we know...the better we can identify....the less we invest.

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Early childhood education can pay big rewards to families, society | UChicago News

Early childhood education can pay big rewards to families, society | UChicago News | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
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How gender equality could help school reform

How gender equality could help school reform | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
The author of the best-selling “Finnish Lessons: What Can the World Learn About Educational Change in Finland?” gives us a new Finnish lesson. This one is about the importance of gender equality and how it factors into effective school reform.
Linda Alexander's insight:

Just when you think you can't possibly read another article about Finland, a terrific piece like this one surfaces. This article describes the "three essential features in Finnish society that have helped make Finnish education reforms successful . . . features that most ‘educational tourists’ visiting Finland unfortunately overlook. .. because they are considered welfare rather than education measures."  Well, better look again...

 

 

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Academic rigor lacking but not dead, study says | Inside Higher Ed

Academic rigor lacking but not dead, study says | Inside Higher Ed | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
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For additional information on this pilot study, please refer to the following article in the Chronicle of Higher Education:

 

A New Kind of Study Seeks to Quantify the Quality of Higher Education:  http://chronicle.com/article/A-New-Kind-of-Study-Seeks-to/144621/

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Student Body President Asks to be Allowed to Attend School

Student Body President Asks to be Allowed to Attend School | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Currently in my school, parents and teachers are afraid to speak out against what they feel is wrong, which is something that should not be accepted as the "norm". Unfortunately, it's not just teachers and parents, but students as well. You could even say, my school is run by fear.
Linda Alexander's insight:

I listened to this 13 year old student on tape---she makes plausible points that she reads verbatim from a document about this school's poor communications, repressive policies, and the unfairness of kicking her entire family out of the school.  Nonetheless, I would  appreciate hearing something  from school administrators prior to passing any type of firm judgement. Yet, a midyear termination seems more than a tad bit odd; it seems downright vindictive.  

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Ask Lisa Newsletter: Eyerolling, translated

Ask Lisa Newsletter:  Eyerolling, translated | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
Linda Alexander's insight:

Dr. Lisa Damour is a top-notch child psychologist.  Dr. Damour gives thoughtful advice, especially to parents of teenagers and school teachers.  I would highly recommend signing up for her newsletter.  

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Lou Salza's curator insight, February 5, 5:44 PM

Great advice and common sense in an uncommonly well written newsletter: Ask Lisa--then get better at being a parent!--Lou

Excerpt: 

".....Take one: Sometimes girls use eyerolling to solve a real dilemma that comes with being a teenager: the need to forge her way while still following your rules. Your daughter might roll her eyes while getting up off of the couch to do just what you’ve asked her to do. Along the same lines, your daughter might roll her eyes in response to some of your particularly excellent advice. She might be in total agreement with your suggestion, but saying, “Gosh Mom, what a great idea!” will compromise her independence and make her feel babyish.
 
If your daughter rolls her eyes while doing what you’ve asked, leave it be. More than that, consider silently admiring the impressive eyerolling-while-complying solution that allows her to be a good kid without acting like a goody two-shoes. If your daughter rolls her eyes in response to some of your pithy advice, reassure yourself that she may find your words more useful than she wishes to let on....."
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How did early education weather the Great Recession?

How did early education weather the Great Recession? | Advancement of Teaching & Learning | Scoop.it
New report shows progress on early education is slow despite a wave of advocacy.
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New Literacies and 21st Century Technnologies

"To become fully literate in today’s world, students must become proficient in the new literacies of 21st-century technologies. As a result, literacy educators have a responsibility to effectively integrate these new technologies into the curriculum, preparing students for the literacy future they deserve"


Via Manuel Pinto, Les Howard, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Linda Alexander's comment, February 3, 10:36 AM
This report is actually over 5 years old, so some tech examples not quite as relevant. I thought I had read it earlier, but still a nice roadmap.