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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Advanced Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

Via Seth Dixon
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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 7:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Rescooped by Kristin Owens from Geography Education
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Gentrification spelled out

Gentrification spelled out | Advanced Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
As upscale, high-rise condos and hipster bars opened nearby, longtime customers joked: Is this really still “the ’hood”? Not anymore.

 

In a gentrifying neighborhood in Washington D.C. that was historically African-American, Fish in the ’Hood was an iconic restaurant that captured the feel of the area.  Just this May, the storefront restaurant was renamed Fish in the Neighborhood.

Questions to Ponder: Why?  Does it matter?  What does it mean?


Via Seth Dixon
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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 5:36 PM

I read this article after Moss's op-ed piece, and the tactic that White used in order to keep his business is the practical kind of survival tactic that I found missing in Moss's piece. White says, “We’re adjusting, because it’s the only way to survive. I try to look and see what’s around me.” Instead of refusing to adapt his business to the changing environment, White did what a successful businessman should do: satisy the demands of his clientele. His clientele changed, so his business did. Stories about businesses like White's make me less sympathetic to the people who "cry gentrification."

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 9:16 AM

This article was a very interesting read. It shines a light that, with a moderate and humble pace, gentrification might not completely dismantle a community's cultural identity. Although this shop-keep is making an attempt at keeping up with the change he see's in the neighborhood, it might not be entirely necessary. 

Bottom line, people who are new to a community should be entering and supporting local businesses that have ties to the neighborhood and not just the kitchy hipster bars that pop up like dandelions in an untended meadow.  

Thea Harvey-Brown's curator insight, April 24, 8:17 AM

This is a great article that focuses on the effects of gentrification on a single restaurant. This personal narrative reveals the lack of control that these originally lower income neighborhoods now face.