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Disruptive Demographics

Disruptive Demographics | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Last night I had the pleasure of attending a tremendously entertaining and incredibly informative professional development evening at the APHG reading (that isn’t an easy combination to pull of either, and he did marvelously). Dr. James Johnson is a trained geographer teaching in the School of Business at the University of North Carolina.  His talk, entitled “Disruptive Demographics: Implications for Global Competitiveness” (PDF file available here) follows in a tradition of superb presentation at the reading; in 2012, Roger Downs gave a great professional development presentation on geographic expertise.



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Dennis V Thomas's insight:
great overview of America's changing demographics!
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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:41 AM

Well explained this is an update on the Demographic Transition Model, taking into account the prospect of negative population growth.

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If the World Where a Village of 100 People...

What if the world's population were reduced to 100 people community?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners.  For more information see: http://www.miniature-earth.com/


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Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...

 

I've used similar videos in my classes and students are usually quite shocked to see how a city like Bangkok, Thailand operates.  I've used this as a 'hook' for lessons of population growth, urbanization, economic development, sustainability, megacities and city planning. 


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 2:28 PM

It is scary to see areas that use train-tracks as location for the marketplace. When the train approaches, people move inches away, and once the train has left, re-group and keep selling. Even tho this is a way of using areas for multiple things, it is very dangerous and i cant imagine that they foods and items don't get ruined and/or contaminated. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 7:49 PM

The first part of the video you see a train passing by. The next part of the video you see the areas around the train tracks transform into a thriving marketplace. In a mega-city such as Bangkok, one should take advantage of any available space. Most people would not use this area as a marketplace, but these people are not wasting space, as it helps them generate money from their businesses. This area along the train tracks now serves two purposes, one being the transportation from the train and the other a marketplace. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 11:38 AM

I found this video disturbing.  Maybe because we have train safety taught to us were they stress that you need to stay away from the tracks, here the people are sitting next to a train track and even have goods for sale that the train drives over.  I think it is interesting how they reclaim the space but the mom in me worries about kids getting run over by the train.

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Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S.

Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S. | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
As immigration levels from Mexico have plunged, the number of new arrivals from Asia has increased.

 

Don't listen to the election year rhetoric about immigration policies if you want to understand the shifting demographic profile of immigrants entering the United States.  For years now, immigration from Latin America has been at incredibly low levels mainly from 1) limited job market in the U.S. (weakening the pull factor), 2) increased deportation (weakening the pull factor) and 3) a sharp drop in Mexican birth rates (weakening the push factor).  What other push and pull factors are influences this change in the demographic profile of migrants?   Considering that Asian migrants are more highly educated that the rest of the American population (and Hispanics have less education than the general U.S. population), how will this change the labor market within the different sectors of the economy?


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 8:46 AM
If you just listen to politicians you'd never get your facts straight. This here is a prime example of that. It can't hurt to have better educated immigrants, according to the statistics, but it may not be long before our citizens are crying out that the higher paying jobs are no longer in abundance. This could easily effect the demand for schooled and skilled job seekers, in an already damaged job market.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 12, 2012 3:14 AM
It's not even just politicians that give you false data, media outlets such as FOX news would never reveal information like this. I agree Roland, there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a better educated immigrant population.
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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 3, 2011 5:05 PM
This is absolutely shocking! I never thought this was possible. It is even more shocking that it is so common within many countries and not just Hong Kong. The only two countries that seem to be in good standings are Canada and Brazil. All other 14 are at risk during the years 3000 to about 3050. Now due to this shrinking in female population then leading to just shrinking in population in general, wouldn't this then lead to a serious decrease in our global population and be for the better. Could this then mean more resources and less poverty? Although another idea that just came to mind, this situation would benefit India because they value males over females. The male is favored because they inherit land, pass on the family name, and financially provide for the parents. Overall this female population decline just merges a variety of concerns.
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Beyond 7 Billion

Beyond 7 Billion | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
After remaining stable for most of human history, the world's population has exploded over the last two centuries. The boom is not over: The biggest generation in history is just entering its childbearing years.

 

The Los Angeles Times has produced an in-depth interactive feature centered around the impact of an increasing global population.  With videos, population clocks, narrated graphics, maps, photos and articles, this is treasure trove of resources that cuts across many disciplines. 


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Trisha Klancar's comment, August 21, 2012 11:34 AM
Great link, thanks!