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Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.


Via Seth Dixon
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Do these look like they are contiguous and compact? Many of the issues in the House of Reps is that districts have been created that are super majority for one party and the only competition is in the primary. This creates extremism and diminishes the opportunity for dialog. Only radicles can be elected in the primary election and those that represent the majority are defeated. One great example was Dick Lugar in Indiana.

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Noel Magee's curator insight, April 11, 8:07 PM

This short, simple depiction of gerrymandering serves a strong message. Congressional districts have literally been turned into a jigsaw puzzle. While we can all agree that it is nice to have votes in our own favor, it is unfair to allow political parties to divide up the United States unfairly. It is imperative that such an important decision be fair and justifiable. For the good or our nation, gerrymandering needs to be controlled. When it comes to elections, the United States should be divided fairly and properly. Any altering of the district lines should be considered unethical, immoral, and should be made known to the public so they can decide what should be done. This type of decision affects every single individual living in America, and this should be the least of our worries. It may be beneficial to political parties at the time, but the changing of these should be an eye opener of the type of congressional "leaders" that we look to to make executive decision regarding the rest of our lives. 

 

*Module 7

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 6:51 PM

This showed me how unfair gerrymandering is and how it is a total false representation of what the people want. This diagram not only showed me how it works but it also showed me how it is so unfair...

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, May 26, 7:36 PM

I. Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other. In this puzzle, the user has to place the congressional districts onto the state/county. 

 

II. I liked this puzzle. I thought it illustrated the oddity of the redrawn districts and highlighted the unfairness of the voting system. The weird shapes of the districts showed how hard the political officials would try to get a voting area where they would be supported. The unfairness is also illustrated with the idea that the congressional districts can be put into a puzzle, where a fair district would be shaped like rectangles or equally sized squares. 

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38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed

38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Some prime examples of fascinating maps." 


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Jordan Macpherson's comment, November 4, 2013 11:50 PM
CRAZY!
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 2014 7:46 PM

This shows 38 maps of the world in completely different formats with different map projections and colorings. 

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 11:43 AM

Map number 7 shows what New Yorkers complain about the most in their beloved city. The complaints are split into noise, graffiti and litter. It is no surprise that most New Yorkers complain about noise in Manhattan, well because it is one of the largest cities in the world, of course there is going to be noise. And then looking on the outskirts of the main city in Manhattan there are mostly complaints about litter. The map is mostly blue in most areas. As for graffiti there are a couple pockets spread out which is where I’m assuming most gang activity takes place. Queens, the Bronx, and Brooklyn is where most of the graffiti is located according to this map. I liked this ma because it shows what you’re going to see or hear in certain places in the City area.    

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Cancer's Global Footprint

Cancer's Global Footprint | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Cancer is often considered a disease of affluence, but about 70% of cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.
Explore this interactive map to learn about some cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.

 

With this interactive map, users can explore cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.  How do these spatial distributions correlate with other developmental, consumption or economic patterns?  What surpises you about this data?   

 

Tags: medical, mapping, spatial.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:04 PM

The high rates of cancer in the United States and other wealthy countries was not surprising, the high rates of liver cancer in West Africa was. Similarly, the very high rates of liver and stomach cancer in China and Mongolia was shocking since the apparent cause is salty, pickled foods.

 

I imagine 30 years from now the rates of lung cancer will drop off a cliff for the United States, but I wonder if the same would be true for Poland which also has a very high rate of lung cancer.

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Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)!

Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)! | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This is more for the teachers than the students since this is most certainly not a current pop culture reference.  Still, what's better than an interactive map displaying the locations where Johnny Cash has been while listening to him sing "I've Been Everywhere?"  (Tech support: Use Google Chrome or Safari to play and ignore the finger).  


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Zoe Alexander's comment, December 4, 2012 12:06 AM
The map is missing Baranquilla, it's a city in Colombia
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Why Map Projections Matter

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection.  While a bit comical, the cartographic debate is quite informative even if it was designed to appear as though the issue was trivial. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  

 

Tags: Mapping, geospatial, video, visualization. 

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Lydia Blevins's comment, September 13, 2012 6:17 AM
I think it is very important that we start using more accurate maps. In school, the maps we use are so different from how the world actually is. I agree that children will grow up thinking some places are less important because they are minimized by the map projection.
Greg Atkinson's comment, October 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Great clip. I use it in my WRG class as a comedic introduction to the power of projection.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:01 PM

This absolutely the best video clip for SS teachers EVER!

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Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving

Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

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Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 11:15 AM
I thought this was interesting showing the flight from the northeast and midwest
Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, January 30, 2013 10:45 AM

This is a dynamic illustration of international migration in the US that fits nicely within Chapter 3.

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 4:51 PM

This map show the immigration and emigration of people in the United States. It gives you a visual representation of all the people moving in and out of an area. 

 

Something I noticed by looking at the map was that there are a huge amount of people leaving and moving in the major cities. Initially I thought that there would be a larger income than outcome in the big cities but the flow seemed pretty stable.

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Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This link is a companion site to the book, "Mapping the Nation: History & Cartography in 19th Century America" by Susan Schulten.  The author and publisher have made all of the images available digitally, and they are organized by chapter as well as chronologically.  This a great resource to find some of the important maps that shaped America and help mold the manner in which we conceptualize America.  Geography and history teachers alike will be able to draw on these materials.  The chapters include:

The Graphic Foundations of American History Capturing the Past Through Maps Disease, Expansion & Rise of Environmental Mapping Slavery and the Origin of Statistical Cartography The Cartographic Consolidating of America

 

Tags: book reviews, historical, mapping, USA


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Wind Map

Wind Map | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This is a repeat, but you simply MUST check out Louisiana right now on this map as Hurricane Isaac has made landfall.  

 

"This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version."


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Ken Morrison's comment, August 30, 2012 8:25 PM
That was cool. Thanks for sharing. I have a new fun tool for virtual storm chasing. I'm not as adventurous as I used to be. Is there any chance that there is an international version? We had a big typhoon in Asia this past week. Crazy weather.
Luis Sadeck 's comment, September 24, 2013 9:01 AM
Very crazy this map! One good application from technics of collect of data and building of map enviromental.

Thanks for sharing
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2014 8:53 AM

This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version.  Super cool!!

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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click the both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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Arms Trade

Arms Trade | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This interactive requires WebGL (viewable in Chrome).  Even more compelling than the data is the visualization platform. 


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Gerrymandering: What is it?

Gerrymandering: What is it? | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This page is a quick primer for understanding how the decennial census leads to the incredibly political process of reapportionment of the congressional districts.  It also defines the specific gerrymandering techniques of packing, cracking, hijacking and kidnapping as well as the historical origin of the term.


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Africa Map Collection

Africa Map Collection | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:06 PM

Maps come in all shapes and sizes. This one shows the divisions in Africa and how its been shaped and defined since colonization.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:58 PM

This is a fun collection of maps because you can see how the European view of Africa has changed over time. These maps contain nonexistent land marks such as the Mountains of Kong, these are here because cartographers made their maps based off incorrect information and then passed this information on to others who repeated their mistakes. African was known as the dark continent not only because of European racism but because of the lack of knowledge on behalf of the Europeans. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:19 AM

While most people perceive Africa as a country rather than a continent, European cartographers were even more oblivious to the make up of the continent. How is it possible that a mountain can directly across the continent. This also raises the question, how was conquering the continent possible if this mountain sat at the frontier of the continent? Wouldn't the natives know where to escape when European settlers came to conquer their land?

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Maps and the Geospatial Revolution

Maps and the Geospatial Revolution | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Learn how advances in geospatial technology and analytical methods have changed how we do everything, and discover how to make maps and analyze geographic patterns using the latest tools."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 21, 2013 1:35 PM

When I was a graduate student at Penn State, I was introduced to some great people and programs and I'm glad to see that the institution has continued to excel and be a leader.  You have probably heard of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Course) and been interested in seeing how this might change higher education in the future.  This MOOC is a free 5-week course designed to be an introduction to mapping, GIS and geospatial technologies so you don't need to be a specialists with a mapping background: it's for beginners.  I know that many geography teachers tell their students about GIS, but are afraid to teach with GIS because they are worried that it will be too hard.  This is an easy on-ramp to 21st century geospatial tools and any geography teacher hoping to modernize their skillset would do well to take this summer course fromthe Program of Online Geospatial Education at Penn State, taught by Dr. Anthony Robinson.  For more information on this, see this annoucement from Directions Magazine and from Penn State News.    


Tags: GIS, teacher training, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Leigha Tew's comment, November 6, 2013 9:41 PM
GIS is redefining mapping skills. In 21st Century education, it is crucial that we communicate GIS literacy in our geography curriculums and classrooms. As a geography teacher it is, therefore, also crucial that I have a thorough and sound knowledge of this field. This course could strongly assist such an understanding as professional development throughout my teaching career.
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Market Segmentation

Market Segmentation | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Nielsen Prizm is a tool used by companies to analyze their customers spending habits, lifestyle choices and spatial patterns.  Using their Zip Code Look Up feature, you can search any zip code to g...

 

This is an interesting glimpse into how market research analysts view neighborhoods, geography and spatial analysis.  This economic and cultural data has a wide range of uses (albeit with some serious limitations). 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, neighborhood, place, economic, consumption, spatial, mapping. 


Via Seth Dixon
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CIM Academy's curator insight, July 17, 5:13 AM

Segmentation is a key element in strategic planning. This article discusses the importance of market segmentation and provides some key insights. 

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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.

 

This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!
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Mapping American Stereotypes

Mapping American Stereotypes | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

There are plenty of regional biases about other places.  This map was generated by Google autocomplete.  If you Google, "Why is Rhode Island so...." if will automatically suggest some responses.  This was done for all the states and these autoresponses are quite revealing (and often humorous). 


Via Seth Dixon
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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 9:59 PM
I find it funny that from state to state the same adjectives are being used over and over again. For example: "so boring," "so humid," and "so liberal." As much as there are stereotypes for each region, we share the same qualities as a union, for the most part.
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Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This link is a companion site to the book, "Mapping the Nation: History & Cartography in 19th Century America" by Susan Schulten.  The author and publisher have made all of the images available digitally, and they are organized by chapter as well as chronologically.  This a great resource to find some of the important maps that shaped America and help mold the manner in which we conceptualize America.  Geography and history teachers alike will be able to draw on these materials.  The chapters include:

The Graphic Foundations of American History Capturing the Past Through Maps Disease, Expansion & Rise of Environmental Mapping Slavery and the Origin of Statistical Cartography The Cartographic Consolidating of America

 

Tags: book reviews, historical, mapping, USA


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Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
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Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This link is a companion site to the book, "Mapping the Nation: History & Cartography in 19th Century America" by Susan Schulten.  The author and publisher have made all of the images available digitally, and they are organized by chapter as well as chronologically.  This a great resource to find some of the important maps that shaped America and help mold the manner in which we conceptualize America.  Geography and history teachers alike will be able to draw on these materials.  The chapters include:

The Graphic Foundations of American History Capturing the Past Through Maps Disease, Expansion & Rise of Environmental Mapping Slavery and the Origin of Statistical Cartography The Cartographic Consolidating of America

 

Tags: book reviews, historical, mapping, USA


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It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All!

It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All! | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Ever since my first visit to to Disneyland, I was intrigued by the  the ride 'It's a Small World After All."  As a youngster, it was an opportunity to get in cool boat ride that I always regretted half way into the ride once the song was firmly chiseled into my mind.  This blog post explores the curious and fascinating geographical imaginations, the visions of folk cultures and global harmony behind this Disneyland ride.  This fabulous map charts that vision. 


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melissa stjean's comment, September 4, 2012 12:20 PM
"It's a small world" is what thousands if not millions of kids hear on this ride a year. They are driven through the continents and are greated by happy faces of the natives to that land. The ride is somewhat dumbed down for kids, showing them what "its really like" in these countries, but the truth is most of the these countries are not clean, and happy as Disney makes them out to be. Though the ride is a good step to open kids minds about the world, but when they grow up they realize that its not that small, happy world afterall.
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Red State Reads, Blue State Reads

Red State Reads, Blue State Reads | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
What political books are residents of your state reading? A new interactive map from Amazon shows recent book sales broken down by either "red" or "blue" political leanings.

 

I do not think that "book sales" is a surrogate for "projected votes," but this is revealing about the political landscape and especially the marketing of politically partisan materials. 


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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click the both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.