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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

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Why Vikings Abandoned Colony in Greenland

Why Vikings Abandoned Colony in Greenland | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
For years, researchers have puzzled over why Viking descendents abandoned Greenland in the late 15th century.

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James Good's comment, April 19, 2013 6:33 PM
It would make sense that the Vikings abandoned Greenland because they felt isolated from their mother country. There must have been a strong Scandanavian folk culture that the people of Greenland valued enough to make such a drastic movement. It is very likely that the people of Greenland cherished their home land and its culture. This culture was probably more exciting to them then the dismal life in the far north.

Once the demand for walrus tusks and seal skins decreased, there was really no need for the Vikings to stay in Greenland anyways. If they did not want to become farmers and take advantage of the potential farming land that Greenland had to offer, then there would be no benefit to staying there anyway.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:25 AM
Humans have been exploring our planet for thousands of years. Settlements are established, and deemed successful or unsuccessful. The successful ones are still around today, however the unsuccessful one’s usually fall to the wayside and are forgotten. Many things can make a colony of human exploration unsuccessful, much like Viking colonies in Greenland. These colonies were abandoned and archeologists have search for the reasons why. Questions of the fertility of the land and available animals to hunt have been reasons that archeologists use to explain the colonial abandonment.
The push and pull factors of ancient Viking life are apparent through their migratory patterns. There are many possible reasons for the Vikings to have left this colony though archeologists are struggling to find just one. Food source seems to be a major reason why other colonies were abandoned, though seal meat does not seem to be at a shortage in this area. Ancient reason of migrating is similar to modern ones, however they are also very different. Globalization has changed the way humans live, the interconnectedness of the world has made living in places that could support life in ancient times possible.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:11 PM
Of course they left, who would want to be basically stranded on Greenland away from any other civilization? Not me for sure. Plus, the lack of supplied they were receiving and tools it would have been near impossible to live and thrive in Greenland. They were also losing their identity; they were thinking of themselves more as farmers and ranchers rather than fishermen and hunters, their original identity as Scandinavians. Nonetheless it was imperative that they leave and head home because the colony in Greenland surely would have run dry and died out. If not for the overkilling of seals for food or the bone-chilling winters, I might theorize that they might stay in Greenland however that is not how history unfolded and it doesn’t surprise me that they left. Like James said, once their trade had virtually ceased, the outpost in Greenland was useless because they could be just living back home where you weren’t in extreme weather conditions and living off of seal meat.
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Market Segmentation

Market Segmentation | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Nielsen Prizm is a tool used by companies to analyze their customers spending habits, lifestyle choices and spatial patterns.  Using their Zip Code Look Up feature, you can search any zip code to g...

 

This is an interesting glimpse into how market research analysts view neighborhoods, geography and spatial analysis.  This economic and cultural data has a wide range of uses (albeit with some serious limitations). 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, neighborhood, place, economic, consumption, spatial, mapping. 


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CIM Academy's curator insight, July 17, 5:13 AM

Segmentation is a key element in strategic planning. This article discusses the importance of market segmentation and provides some key insights. 

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The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
We can be connected (or disconnected) based on where we move, how we speak, and even what sports teams we root for.

 

This article is a great source for discussion material on regions (include the ever-famous "Soda/Pop/Coke" regions).  How do we divide up our world?  What are the criteria we use for doing so?


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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:22 AM

i believe that these fifty states are divided into three different regions that define them by what those regions are made of. Those regions im talking about are the formal, functional, and vernacular regions. Some types of examples of those regions are common language, transportaion, and mental maps. I.C.

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U.S. Obesity Trends

U.S. Obesity Trends | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

It's pretty widely known that Americans are becoming increasingly more obese...but there is a geographic context to this phenomenon.  These maps help students explore these factors.   


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Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 18, 2012 3:01 PM
According to this map obesity occurs all over but is more highly concentrated in the South and Mid West area such as Illinios and Michican. While states in the heartland have no "recorded data" and thus there trying to say they are not obese. I think this map is biased and not accurate because it's implied message is that Americans are not truly obese.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, September 15, 2013 9:15 PM

The section about obesity and socioeconomic status was the most interesting to me, specifically that richer non-Hispanic blacks are more likely to be obese than their poorer counterparts while wealtheir women tend to be skinnier than poorer women. I've always understood obesity to be a problem largely driven by the nutrition of low-cost foods (McDonalds, KFC, etc.) yet these two statistics seem to contradict each other and require I take a more nuanced look at the epidemic. The fact that the South and the Midwest are leading the data in most obese does not come as a surprise to me. Stereotypes of Southern fried chicken and biscuits are coming to mind while my own experience of the Minnesota State Fair (everything on a stick!) makes the statistics jive with my own mindset. 

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Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.

 

Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.

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Un-Fair Campaign

Un-Fair Campaign | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

The University of Wisconsin-Superior is in one of the least ethnically diverse regions of the United States and the university is partnering with other local organizations across that region aimed at highlighting structural advantages within society for Caucasians.  This campaign to make 'white privilege' visible has not surprisingly generated controversy and has made race and its impact of society an issue quite visible, to the discomfort of many.   The author of the book, "Colorblind," speaks about this issue on PBS as he argues that the United States is not in a post-racial society. 

Questions to Ponder:  In what tangible ways can you see 'white privilege' in our society?  Is this ad campaign a good idea?  What does the term normativity mean and how does it relate to this topic? 

Tags: race, racism, culture, unit 3 culture, book review and ethnicity.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 4, 2012 11:56 AM
I believe this campaign is being made aware in the Wisconsin area of the U.S. because the population is primarily white. Therefore, this region may be trying to make its people aware of the fact that racism can still exist even though this region may be ignorant to this issue. And this region is not to blame for its ignorance because a vast, non-diverse racial community is all they are exposed to, and all they know.
Seth Dixon's comment, September 4, 2012 9:29 PM
I think some people feel that pointing out institutionalized bias feels as though the campaign is blaming them for simply being white. I had a special blue ticket to go to the front of the DMV line today and I was thrilled but it made me think about the others still waiting. There's an analogy in there but I don't want to force it.
steffiquah's curator insight, July 16, 2014 7:25 AM

There is no logic as to why whites should be treated better than the blacks. It is society being biased and we could make a difference. A colour shouldn't define a person's personality, fate, or future. We should not be biased towards them but instead, give them fair and equal opportunities as any other people. I personally do not think racism should be a problem in the first place. What makes them discriminate blacks and make them lower than the whites in the first place? I hope something can be done about this.

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It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All!

It’s a Small (and Cartographically Incorrect) World After All! | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Ever since my first visit to to Disneyland, I was intrigued by the  the ride 'It's a Small World After All."  As a youngster, it was an opportunity to get in cool boat ride that I always regretted half way into the ride once the song was firmly chiseled into my mind.  This blog post explores the curious and fascinating geographical imaginations, the visions of folk cultures and global harmony behind this Disneyland ride.  This fabulous map charts that vision. 


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melissa stjean's comment, September 4, 2012 12:20 PM
"It's a small world" is what thousands if not millions of kids hear on this ride a year. They are driven through the continents and are greated by happy faces of the natives to that land. The ride is somewhat dumbed down for kids, showing them what "its really like" in these countries, but the truth is most of the these countries are not clean, and happy as Disney makes them out to be. Though the ride is a good step to open kids minds about the world, but when they grow up they realize that its not that small, happy world afterall.
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How the languages we speak affects the way we think

What can economists learn from linguists?

Tags: language, culture, economic, TED.


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Anne-Lous van den Ende's curator insight, May 7, 2013 11:18 AM

Intersting video on how the different languages we speak could affect our way of thinking.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:39 PM

I have never thought of this. I didn't even realise how different languages and cultures can be and how the tiny things effect the entire language.This demostrates why some languages are beter than others in their own way. 

Ms. Brin's curator insight, August 28, 2014 2:12 AM

Very interesting!

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France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:39 PM

I think that language chances as culture changes, as time passed things get more modern. For example the past summer I went back to Dominican Republic, I haven’t been there for almost eight years. Even though I kept in contact with my family over there, I was very shock to find how much the Spanish that I knew in Dominican Republic have change so much. I don’t think is possible to keep a language pure, society is not the same as 100 years ago, I bet that certain words that were correct in the English dictionary don’t even exist anymore.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:21 PM

unit 3

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 16, 2:52 PM

I can't say I was a fan of Ms. Burnett's reporting style. First of all, implying that America is the only country that speaks English was a little blind. Second, the little chuckles and smirks she gives is a bit condescending. She came off rather harsh and confronting of the French. And I'm sure France isn't "declaring war on English" as they are probably doing this to other languages. Finally, her last remark referencing the song "Voulez vous coucher avec moi" was a tad inappropriate in my opinion. That being said, it's understandable for a country to try and protect its language. It's part of its culture and its heritage.

 

Languages change overtime through interaction with other people. Like Ms. Burnett pointed out, there are some French words that have become common use in the everyday American conversation like a la carte and bon voyage. It is impossible to keep a language "pure" or rid of other language influences in today's society. With all the interaction happening via the web and other media outlets, people are bound to pick up words from other languages to use in their lives. 

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Indo-European Language Family Tree

Indo-European Language Family Tree | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
This page contains several versions of the Indo-European language family tree in graphic format, copyright by Dan Short.
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Mapping American Stereotypes

Mapping American Stereotypes | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

There are plenty of regional biases about other places.  This map was generated by Google autocomplete.  If you Google, "Why is Rhode Island so...." if will automatically suggest some responses.  This was done for all the states and these autoresponses are quite revealing (and often humorous). 


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 9:59 PM
I find it funny that from state to state the same adjectives are being used over and over again. For example: "so boring," "so humid," and "so liberal." As much as there are stereotypes for each region, we share the same qualities as a union, for the most part.
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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


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Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2:05 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article is about how many countries in the world are experiencing a shrinking population in women. In about 83 countries women are going on marriage strikes by refusing to get married. This has caused a severe drop in the amount of women being born. There are predictions that some countries such as Hong Kong will see their last woman born in the year 2798. Many places are now trying to encourage people to have daughters in order to offset the low female composition. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it deals with population and sex composition. In man countries the female population is dramatically dropping and scientist are predicting women to die out. This also relates to government policies because some places are trying to change the outcome and encourage females. This shows what technology and visualization of populations can do to predict the future. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 7:25 PM

Summary:  This article provides an optimistic outlook on future population growth.  Stating that in wealthy countries and cities with no migration population may even disappear.  

 

Insight:  While this article seems very hard to believe considering what we've learned I think it represents Unit 2 very well because it still analyzes population growth over time based on female wealth.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 23, 10:36 PM

This article illustrated how women are becoming more independent and educated. The article tells you that women, "... are preferring the single life, to marital yoke." This leads to the decrease of fertility rates. As women start to focus more on themselves and their career; instead of building a family, they tend to wait on having kids. This trend is occuring especially in Asian countries. Statistics from the UN conclude that if fertility rates don't increase, in 83 countries, women will not have daughters to replace them. For example Hong Kong, it is predicted that 1,000 women will only produce 547 daughters. The drop is now having reseachers predict when populations will see, "...birth of its last women". The female population in Hong will decrease from 3.75 million to 1 million in 25 generations. Researchers say Hong Kong will see the last, "...birth of its last women" in 2798!  The article used a country-year diagram to show what year the countries will see the last birth of its women.

 

This article relates to topics in Unit 2: Population and Migration. It uses a composition model to organize and efficiently show its data. The article and model shows patterns of fertility and prediction and facts of how a change in the lifestyle of women are affecting populations all over the world. Populations are greatly affected to the point where they can become eradicated. The article was really interesting and I was surprised at how short the predicted amount of time is for the last birth of a women in a population. This article also really illustrates and reveal how women play a big part in - what was- a man dominating world.

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McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
McDonald's plans to open the first in a series of all-vegetarian restaurants in India next year. But rest assured, in most locations around the world, meat will stay on the menu.

 

Many of the most successful global companies or brands use highly regional variations that are attuned to local cultural norms and customs.  The McAloo Tikki burger— which uses a spicy, fried potato-based patty — is the Indian McDonald's top seller.

 

Tags: Globalization, food, culture, unit 3 culture and SouthAsia.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 3:14 PM

I think it makes sense that there are not a lot of restaurants (less than 300) restaurants in India seeing as Indian food is not the most popular types of cuisine in the world. As much as I think McDonald's is disgusting, people would rather eat McDonald's than Indian food. It's not a problem to Indians and its Islamic individuals because cows are sacred to Hindus and Muslims don't eat pork so that leaves chicken to be eaten by Hindus and Muslims. McDonald's in the United States is different compared to McDonald's in India because India's McDonalds puts an Indian fusion on there food and they changed their menu to 50 percent vegetarian.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 9, 9:52 PM

When you typically think of a McDonald's, vegetarian is not what comes to mind. India plans on opening it's first vegetarian McDonald's since the majority of the population just simply does not even eat meat. There are already 271 of this restaurant in India already but they are looking for a new growth. Many Hindu's and Muslims don't eat pork, or cows because it is sacred to them. More chicken and vegetables will be served at this new restaurant and the older restaurants menus are 50% vegetarian. This is interesting to see because you do not think of fast food places being healthy at all. I think this is a great idea having different option for individuals who don't eat certain things. This is definitely going to be an attraction for not just people living in India but for tourists as well. It'll be a fun story to tell to say that you went to an all vegetarian McDonald's!

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 3:50 PM

It is often said that food is one of the best identifiers of a culture. What better way to define America than McDonalds, right? However, fueled by globalization, McDonalds has moved to several different countries around the world, including India. For religious reasons, the traditional American menu wouldn't fit well in the Indian diet, as most hindu people wouldn't jump at the chance to eat a quarter pound of greasy cow. Globalization and a desire for economic profit has fueled a change in the McDonalds menu in India as well as other countries. In order to succeed in the global market, a comp any must be willing to change to appeal to a more diverse client base. 

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The Impact of Religion on Politics

For the first time in U.S. history, a Mormon is on a major-party presidential ticket. The Wall Street Journal examines the changing role of religion in Ameri...

 

Aren't religion and politics supposed to be the two things we are counseled not to discuss to avoid controversy?  This video hits on something that plays a role for both candidates in the 2012 presidential campaign in the United States: their faith and how voters perceive their faith.  This video discusses Mitt Romney, Barack Obama and some past presidents' religious beliefs.  I feel this video handles very controversial topics in a thoughtful and fair manner given that it treats various religious traditions and political ideologies in a non-partisan manner.  The geography of religion might play an significant role in the outcome of the 2012 election.   


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Rishi Suresh's curator insight, January 16, 2014 12:40 PM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows how religion is an unavoidable part of a country's culture, including in politics.

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This article explains how religion is related to politics, and how religion and politics interact which is related to this section

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to this section because religion is a big part of a country and it defines many things, even the government sometimes.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the relationship between religions and people's beliefs. People's beliefs are influenced by religion, as their religion forces them to draw some rules they would have otherwise disregarded.

 

Rishi Suresh: Religion is unavoidably a part of politics. Religion is involved in many things that may at first glance seem to be outside its area of influence. 

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Indo-European Languages Originated in Anatolia, Biologists Say

Indo-European Languages Originated in Anatolia, Biologists Say | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Evolutionary biologists say the first speakers of what would become the Indo-European languages were probably farmers in what is now Turkey — a conclusion that differs by hundreds of miles and thousands of years from a longstanding linguistic theory.

 

This research potentially can explain much about the geography of languages and the distribution of cultural groups in Eurasia. 

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Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 27, 2014 11:33 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of language, language diffusion, and philological history, as it dates all of the languages of Europe back to a unified whole in the past wherein one language in Anatolia sparked all these other languages to eventually take hold.