Advance Placement Human Geography
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Time-Space Compression

Time-Space Compression | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
In this age of fast travel and instant digital communications, we tend to forget that not so long ago, distances were subjectively very different.

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geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 4:35 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  

 

Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  "

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 7:54 PM

With the development of modern equipment useful in maneuvering around the world, the time it took those living in the 1800's has been reduced to getting anywhere around the world with time spanning from 30- 24hrs. This of course has been made possible due to the development of roads, better boating constructions and air travel.

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:12 PM

Since 1800 the rate of travel has increased exponentially through the years. From the very beginning of travel, it would take close to a week just to get from the east coast to the middle of the United States. Through the use of railroads we have overcome the "time" factor and essentially eliminated it from playing a role in the way we travel. Today's advances in transportation has made seeing others much easier and most importantly it has developed a connected world that allows for transport of goods and services possible to such an extent that as citizens of the United states we are able to access almost anything we need from a day to day basis. A technology like this will continue to expand and grow to make the life of people that much easier.

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The Geography of Gun Deaths

The Geography of Gun Deaths | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
A look at some factors that common knowledge says should be associated with gun violence, but statistics don't back up
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Here is a study that looks at correlations between firearm deaths and a variety of psychological, economic, social, and political characteristics of states.  This of course is correlations not causation.  So there are could be other contributing factors but still a good read and something to think about.

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UN calls for more protection for Afghan women

UN calls for more protection for Afghan women | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
UN finds progress on tackling violence against women but calls for more action, as activists decry culture of impunity.
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Why a City’s Not a Country

Why a City’s Not a Country | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Cancer's Global Footprint

Cancer's Global Footprint | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Cancer is often considered a disease of affluence, but about 70% of cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.
Explore this interactive map to learn about some cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.

 

With this interactive map, users can explore cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.  How do these spatial distributions correlate with other developmental, consumption or economic patterns?  What surpises you about this data?   

 

Tags: medical, mapping, spatial.  


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:04 PM

The high rates of cancer in the United States and other wealthy countries was not surprising, the high rates of liver cancer in West Africa was. Similarly, the very high rates of liver and stomach cancer in China and Mongolia was shocking since the apparent cause is salty, pickled foods.

 

I imagine 30 years from now the rates of lung cancer will drop off a cliff for the United States, but I wonder if the same would be true for Poland which also has a very high rate of lung cancer.

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Israel and Palestine

Seth Dixon has provided a great intro to this video...

 

Watch this Jewish Voice for Peace (http://jewishvoiceforpeace.org/) 6 minute mini-primer about why Israelis and Palestinians are fighting..

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth. In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 2015 8:40 PM

From 1946 to 2000, Palestine (Islamic individuals) have been at war with Israel (Jewish individuals) over land in Israel/Palestine. In 1946, Palestine took over most of Israel but throughout the decades up until 2000, Israel slowly won over almost every piece of Israel and now, Palestine barely has any land in Israel. From 1949 to 1967, Palestine took over a specific area of Israel known as the West Bank and another small part of Israel known as Gaza. There was a lot of war going on between Israel and Palestine because Israel discriminated against non-Jews. Palestinians became refugees but that didn't stop Israel from fighting to take over Palestinian land.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 30, 2015 1:03 AM

The video was informative, but bias. I have a stronger understanding of how Israel is exploiting, how the borders were re-drawn, and how the make up of the original border mattered. However, the author gave me these facts in a very pro-Palestinian manner. The narrator sees the Palatines as refugees instead of the Jews, who as the narrator said, were "refugees living where people already lived." This similar identity clearly resonated with the narrator who almost 2 minutes of the video speaking about how the treatment of the new refugees was wrong. While a fair amount of the rest of the video advocated a solution to help Palestinian, hence the negative portrayals of the United States backed peace talks.  

 

What was missing from this video was Israeli's story. The Jewish community had become a large force within Palestinian, but was not being aptly recognized. In fact, the Palestinian's prior to the UN offer weren't treating the Jews fair. When this offer came along, it was the Palestinian's who started the fight, a point that was down played in this video as the narrator rushed to point the finger at Israeli's wrong doings. Yet, another portrayal of this conflict mentioned in class, showed the Israeli's feel threatened because they are a minority surrounded by enemies within the region. All of this information means that the Palestinian's and other neighbors play more of a negative hand in the land dispute than what the narrator says.    

 

To be honest, I don't know enough about either side to really say who I support. However, from what I gather, neither side is a bushel of roses. As learned in class their were a fair deal of geographic tensions from BOTH parties that caused the fighting and their is still a fair deal of geographic tensions from BOTH parties that factor into the fighting today. Thus, the bias of this video acts as a reminder that a person looking to understand a heated conflict, such as this one between neighbors, must view the information with causation. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:30 PM

first off, this video is very pro isrelis which must be kept in mind. also i dont know what the palestinians and surrounding countries expected. the jews had nowhere to go and were sent there by england. where else where they to go? instead of accepting this the palestinians started to attack them and when they lost they wanted to come back and live there, of course the jews were not going to let them back in. neither side is completely right or wrong but i can see the jewish side more than the palestinians.

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Generate Simple World Maps | Geography Education

Generate Simple World Maps | Geography Education | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Free travel tip and photos from all over the world... This map is not a professionally produced map and that is the beauty of this website.

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What Can You Do With Geography?

What Can You Do With Geography? | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
National Geographic video featuring Keith Masback of USGIF.

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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.

 

This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!
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Election graphics show how Obama won

Election graphics show how Obama won | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Click image to see slideshow of maps that break down how Obama won. The presidential election is over, and now there are some cool tools to show just how Barack Obama won re-election.

 

Great set of maps that show the real scale of victory for President Obama.  The shades of purple even tells a more enlightening story of how united we really are. 

 

 

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82 iconic world landmarks to visit before you die [PICs]

82 iconic world landmarks to visit before you die [PICs] | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.
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Exit polls 2012: How votes are shifting

Exit polls 2012: How votes are shifting | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
See how much voter groups have shifted in the 2012 exit polls, compared to 2008. Early numbers are preliminary and may change significantly until midday Wednesday, when poll results are finalized.

 

The 2012 election mostly went as predicted (given Virginia and Florida's voting pattern, I'd invite you to re-think the "Where Does the South Begin" or at least to contextualize the political and cultural implications for the defining the vernacular region of "the South").  I'm sure we've all seen the electoral college map, but this great graphic shows the demographic groups voting patterns that produced that map. 


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Fair Trade Month - Count Me In!

Fair Trade Month - Count Me In! | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Your everyday purchases can help farming families around the world earn fair wages, work in safe conditions, protect the environment, and keep their kids in school.
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Remote Sensing Images

Remote Sensing Images | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
It's already unlikely we'll get a view as good as the ones collected in "Earth As Art,"

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 15, 2012 12:41 PM

This article and the selected gallery is based on the free e-book "Earth as Art" which I've mentioned here before earlier.  This particular image is fantastic for teaching about geomorphology and river systems.  Students can 'see' the historical layers of a meandering stream winding it's way across the landscape.  Connecting the physical geography to human geography, analyzing the flood plains can help explain the land use and settlement patterns in this Mississippi Delta image.   

UPDATE: Here's another meandering stream image (Willamette River, Oregon) that shows the dynamism of fluvial processes quite nicely.

Steven Sutantro's curator insight, December 20, 2012 8:56 PM

the beauty of our earth...

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The Voices of China's Workers

TED Talks In the ongoing debate about globalization, what's been missing is the voices of workers -- the millions of people who migrate to factories in China and other emerging countries to make goods sold all over the world.


Our collective understanding of modern industrialization and globalization needs to go beyond the binary of "oppressors" and "victims."  This lecture explores the voices and lives of Chinese workers that we so often simply see as simply victims of a system, but are full of ambition and agency. 

 

Tags: industry, globalization, labor, China, TED. 


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Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 2:55 PM
In these Chinese factories, they don't view these jobs as harsh or poor treatment because this is better than how they would be doing back in their villages. They want these jobs so bad because they will give them a better life. Also, you have to remember that not all of these Chinese factory workers want to have an iPhone or a Coach purse or Nike shoes, because those things don't have any worth in their culture.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:26 PM

The plight of Chinese workers today is incredibly great. This TED talks explains the situations many in China find themselves in the terrible conditions they must work in. While us in the west see this as unthinkable China's model for success and expansion comes at the cost of their workforce who are subjugated to poor working conditions as very low pay. The real hope for this to change is for the nation as a whole to become wealthy enough that these workers will be able to demand fair wages and work environments. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:08 PM

These workers do see their jobs as opportunities. This video is a great eye opener for people who tend to fall into the trap of looking at globalization as a system of haves and have nots. 

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Morocco: Single mothers call on the government to legalize their pregnancies

Morocco: Single mothers call on the government to legalize their pregnancies | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Morocco: Single mothers call on the government to legalize their pregnancies.


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Why Geography Matters . . . But Is So Little Learned

Why Geography Matters . . . But Is So Little Learned | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This article by Walter McDougall (2003 by Orbis) is worth reviewing and is a good reading assignment to start the school year.  The link is to a PDF version of the article. 


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Market Segmentation

Market Segmentation | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Nielsen Prizm is a tool used by companies to analyze their customers spending habits, lifestyle choices and spatial patterns.  Using their Zip Code Look Up feature, you can search any zip code to g...

 

This is an interesting glimpse into how market research analysts view neighborhoods, geography and spatial analysis.  This economic and cultural data has a wide range of uses (albeit with some serious limitations). 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, neighborhood, place, economic, consumption, spatial, mapping. 


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CIM Academy's curator insight, July 17, 2015 5:13 AM

Segmentation is a key element in strategic planning. This article discusses the importance of market segmentation and provides some key insights. 

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Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)!

Johnny Cash Has Been Everywhere (Man)! | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This is more for the teachers than the students since this is most certainly not a current pop culture reference.  Still, what's better than an interactive map displaying the locations where Johnny Cash has been while listening to him sing "I've Been Everywhere?"  (Tech support: Use Google Chrome or Safari to play and ignore the finger).  


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Zoe Alexander's comment, December 4, 2012 12:06 AM
The map is missing Baranquilla, it's a city in Colombia
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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

This article is funny because we were always worried about illegal immigrants entering the U.S from Mexico, and look at it now, Mexicans don’t even want to come to the U.S because they say they are better off staying in Mexico. I never even knew this; that the migration were decreasing as well. But I can relate to this; I have some family members in Portugal, and they don’t want to move here for a better life, they’d rather just stay in Portugal. The U.S isn’t really attractive to people because we are enforcing such rules!!! Well, this is what the U.S wants, to stop illegal immigrants from coming; well, we are getting that because Mexicans don’t want to come!! Also, there hasn’t been much childbirth, so that is a major factor because there are less people, and that will lead to less people trying to get into the U.S. Since education and employment have expanded in Mexico, there really is no need for Mexicans to enter the U.S. They will be better off there!! It is also much more dangerous to enter the U.S now because we have many officials guarding the border. The U.S just doesn’t look like the dreamland anymore; besides, if Mexico has more there now, then they can stay there!! In my opinion, the U.S isn’t a dreamland anymore and the economy has gone downhill!!

Stephanie Cordeiro


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 2014 5:58 PM

I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 2014 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.

 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:11 PM

(Mexico topic 4)

Unlike other articles and videos, this one seems to possess a different "tone" towards the recent drop in immigration. It seems to imply that the drop in immigration will be mutually beneficial to both the US and Mexico. Mexico would benefit from having more workers to help grow its emerging economy, and the US would have fewer Welfare dependents. I'm not saying that I necessarily agree or disagree with this viewpoint, but I do find it to be a very unique take on the situation. I wonder if the reduction in immigration into the US has allowed more funds to be diverted away from collection and deportation to an increased emphasis on security and patrol efforts? In other words, I think that it is a possibility that the United States was, figuratively speaking, too busy "scooping water from the boat" to get around to "plugging the leak".

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Climate Change Video Guide

Climate Change Video Guide | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
An in-depth, multimedia look at climate change, its global impact, and efforts to combat it.

 

This guide on climate change from the Council on Foreign Relations (independent think tank) covers many of the geopolitical, economic and environmental issues that confront the Earth as global temperatures rise.  Rather than produce a full length feature film, they have organized the this as an interactive video, allowing the user to get short (a couple of minutes) answer to specific questions about the science, foreign policy or economic ramifications of adapting to climate change. 

 

Tags: climate change, environmental adaption, economic, industry.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 27, 2012 8:21 AM
Thanks for sharing this Giovanni!!
Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, November 27, 2012 8:38 AM
Thanks to you, Seth! :-)
Jose Sepulveda's comment, January 13, 2013 8:58 AM
Very good information, Thanks!
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How Pandemics Spread

View Full Lesson on TED-ED BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemics-spread In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a pl...

 

This is a great demonstration of why spatial thinking is critical to so many fields, including medicine.

 

Tags: diffusion, medical, historical, spatial.


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 2014 11:33 AM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This video is about how a world wide pandemic can occur and has occurred in history. I thought this was interesting because it  spoke of many specific events like the black death and the 2010 cholera outbreak in haiti, gave detailed information, and was very informal.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows how pandemics and epidemics occur in a detailed way. It also shows how geography has related to epidemic outbreaks by showing disease spread maps and showing how doctors used this to solve the issue of it.

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?
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Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S.

Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S. | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
As immigration levels from Mexico have plunged, the number of new arrivals from Asia has increased.

 

Don't listen to the election year rhetoric about immigration policies if you want to understand the shifting demographic profile of immigrants entering the United States.  For years now, immigration from Latin America has been at incredibly low levels mainly from 1) limited job market in the U.S. (weakening the pull factor), 2) increased deportation (weakening the pull factor) and 3) a sharp drop in Mexican birth rates (weakening the push factor).  What other push and pull factors are influences this change in the demographic profile of migrants?   Considering that Asian migrants are more highly educated that the rest of the American population (and Hispanics have less education than the general U.S. population), how will this change the labor market within the different sectors of the economy?


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 11:46 AM
If you just listen to politicians you'd never get your facts straight. This here is a prime example of that. It can't hurt to have better educated immigrants, according to the statistics, but it may not be long before our citizens are crying out that the higher paying jobs are no longer in abundance. This could easily effect the demand for schooled and skilled job seekers, in an already damaged job market.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 12, 2012 6:14 AM
It's not even just politicians that give you false data, media outlets such as FOX news would never reveal information like this. I agree Roland, there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a better educated immigrant population.
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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 PM

This article was great in that it left me with some great visuals and details on each of the models. For me, it's hard to remember each one of the models but this article really allowed me to compare each one and read about each one all in one place. The layout of the article was also nice and I think that it was just a great overall reminder of the models.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:56 PM

This article teaches you mainly about the Burgess and Hoyt Model. It compares the two, and it gives you detailed information on lots of the urbanization terms.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about how geographers drew up cities and made models of how cities were drawn up. It teaches you how they thought back then, and how urbanization has evolved from then to now.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 5:26 PM
unit 7