Advance Placement Human Geography
1.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

Free Technology for Teachers

Free Technology for Teachers | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Step by step instructions on how to map your own google maps from your data!  Powerful tools for the classroom

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 2015 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

Citizen Science Projects

Citizen Science Projects | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Learn about how you can participate in citizen science projects.
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Great for project based learning and collaboration with environmental science.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

Can Geography Shape the Way We Speak? - Scientific American (blog)

Can Geography Shape the Way We Speak? - Scientific American (blog) | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Can Geography Shape the Way We Speak?
Scientific American (blog)
A recent study published in PLOS One shares evidence that geography may play a part in shaping these sounds.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 2015 11:08 AM

This article reminds us all of the growth-stunt that colonialism in Africa brought to the continent.  It is not surprising to see that most African countries still depend heavily on their old colonial masters for survival.  People who may casually follow African politics might think that colonialism started with the Berlin Conference and ended in 1990 or so, but one could argue that it hasn't ended due to the urgent dependency African countries still have on their old colonizers.  Africa might be the most beautiful continent in the world but has the worst story of any in the world.

Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

Climate Change | LearnStuff

Climate Change | LearnStuff | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Extremely concise source on climate change. 97 percent of scientist agree that human activity is the major contributing factor, But 72 percent of the media push skepticism.  


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism

EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
When horse meat was discovered in beef hamburgers in Ireland last month, governments, corporations and regulators assured a panicked public that it was complete

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, globalization, agribusiness.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
chris tobin's comment, February 28, 2013 3:44 PM
Yes the industry is all about money. The US needs to change their ways, especially in the beef and poultry business. Its mass production, inhumane to animals, and unhealthy .
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:12 PM

What trends in agribusiness are conveyed in this map?

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:30 PM

Why would someone want to do that to a horse? Horses are a great addition to the world because they can come in handy when it comes to pulling cargo and other objects also. Horses are having helped people for hundreds of years. I would go crazy if I found out I was eating horse meet. I am very surprised that those people from Ireland did not find out. There should really be an organization that checks the meet before it goes to supermarkets and other places. 

 

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Agriculture Around The Globe
Scoop.it!

Urban Farming - Photo Essays

Urban Farming - Photo Essays | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Cities in the U.S. and abroad try to grow more food locally

Via Don Brown Jr
more...
Don Brown Jr's curator insight, February 27, 2013 12:24 PM

New & current trends in global agriculture..

Thought to consider, using innovative technology to resolve concerns of sustainable agriculture may not solve the problems of famine, starvation and equality in developing countires with growing populations. As the pictures suggest many of these agricultural innovations seem designed to be implemented in  wealthier developed counties, such as China, Japan and other "Western" states.

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Human Development Index

"This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola)."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Maggie Naude's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:32 PM

some emerging markets, Japan

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:38 PM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde

Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:24 AM

HDI

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How the languages we speak affects the way we think

What can economists learn from linguists?

Tags: language, culture, economic, TED.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Anne-Lous van den Ende's curator insight, May 7, 2013 11:18 AM

Intersting video on how the different languages we speak could affect our way of thinking.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:39 PM

I have never thought of this. I didn't even realise how different languages and cultures can be and how the tiny things effect the entire language.This demostrates why some languages are beter than others in their own way. 

Ms. Brin's curator insight, August 28, 2014 2:12 AM

Very interesting!

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World Cities Quiz

World Cities Quiz | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Try out some geography trivia in our World Cities Quiz: a great geography quiz that tests your knowledge of some of the major cities of the word!

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Vikings Abandoned Colony in Greenland

Why Vikings Abandoned Colony in Greenland | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
For years, researchers have puzzled over why Viking descendents abandoned Greenland in the late 15th century.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
James Good's comment, April 19, 2013 6:33 PM
It would make sense that the Vikings abandoned Greenland because they felt isolated from their mother country. There must have been a strong Scandanavian folk culture that the people of Greenland valued enough to make such a drastic movement. It is very likely that the people of Greenland cherished their home land and its culture. This culture was probably more exciting to them then the dismal life in the far north.

Once the demand for walrus tusks and seal skins decreased, there was really no need for the Vikings to stay in Greenland anyways. If they did not want to become farmers and take advantage of the potential farming land that Greenland had to offer, then there would be no benefit to staying there anyway.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:25 AM
Humans have been exploring our planet for thousands of years. Settlements are established, and deemed successful or unsuccessful. The successful ones are still around today, however the unsuccessful one’s usually fall to the wayside and are forgotten. Many things can make a colony of human exploration unsuccessful, much like Viking colonies in Greenland. These colonies were abandoned and archeologists have search for the reasons why. Questions of the fertility of the land and available animals to hunt have been reasons that archeologists use to explain the colonial abandonment.
The push and pull factors of ancient Viking life are apparent through their migratory patterns. There are many possible reasons for the Vikings to have left this colony though archeologists are struggling to find just one. Food source seems to be a major reason why other colonies were abandoned, though seal meat does not seem to be at a shortage in this area. Ancient reason of migrating is similar to modern ones, however they are also very different. Globalization has changed the way humans live, the interconnectedness of the world has made living in places that could support life in ancient times possible.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:11 PM
Of course they left, who would want to be basically stranded on Greenland away from any other civilization? Not me for sure. Plus, the lack of supplied they were receiving and tools it would have been near impossible to live and thrive in Greenland. They were also losing their identity; they were thinking of themselves more as farmers and ranchers rather than fishermen and hunters, their original identity as Scandinavians. Nonetheless it was imperative that they leave and head home because the colony in Greenland surely would have run dry and died out. If not for the overkilling of seals for food or the bone-chilling winters, I might theorize that they might stay in Greenland however that is not how history unfolded and it doesn’t surprise me that they left. Like James said, once their trade had virtually ceased, the outpost in Greenland was useless because they could be just living back home where you weren’t in extreme weather conditions and living off of seal meat.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

Free Technology for Teachers: Three Ways To Look At The World As A Village

Free Technology for Teachers: Three Ways To Look At The World As A Village | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Sociology
Scoop.it!

Back to School App-pack

Back to School App-pack | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Greg Kulowiec's great blog:

The summer is quickly winding down & a number of teachers will be returning to their classroom with new mobile devices (iPads). Throughout the summer I have been conducting workshops on iPad integration with EdTechTeacher and I thought it might be helpful to pull together a back to school list of apps structured around specific classroom goals. While many schools may already have an Apple VPP program already in place, I know a number of teachers will also be purchasing the apps themselves. Therefore, I will do my best to include both a pay & free app for each objective.


Via Andrea Zeitz, Timo Ilomäki, Matthew Wahl, Dennis V Thomas
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

Get Real-Time Data

Get Real-Time Data | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Get ideas for where to find real-time data.
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Data for your project based learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

Can Geography Shape the Way We Speak? - Scientific American (blog)

Can Geography Shape the Way We Speak?
Scientific American (blog)
A recent study published in PLOS One shares evidence that geography may play a part in shaping these sounds.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other

22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Small lobsters are tearing this nation apart. ;
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Great display of our linguistic diversity!  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Africa Map Collection

Africa Map Collection | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:58 PM

This is a fun collection of maps because you can see how the European view of Africa has changed over time. These maps contain nonexistent land marks such as the Mountains of Kong, these are here because cartographers made their maps based off incorrect information and then passed this information on to others who repeated their mistakes. African was known as the dark continent not only because of European racism but because of the lack of knowledge on behalf of the Europeans. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:19 AM

While most people perceive Africa as a country rather than a continent, European cartographers were even more oblivious to the make up of the continent. How is it possible that a mountain can directly across the continent. This also raises the question, how was conquering the continent possible if this mountain sat at the frontier of the continent? Wouldn't the natives know where to escape when European settlers came to conquer their land?

Luis Cabral's curator insight, March 8, 12:02 AM

This fabulous collection of African maps from 1535-1897 represents an historical geographic vision of both Africa and colonial visions of an imagined Africa.  I chose this particular map to display because it beautifully highlights the Mountains of Kong.  For generations, European cartographers erroneously believed that this long mountain range extended north of the West African coast and across the continent.  Currently this map collection is at Plymouth State, NH, but much of it is archive online here. 


Tags: Africa, cartography, colonialism, map.

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where is an AP course being taught?

Where is an AP course being taught? | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

Where are AP Human Geography courses being taught?  What other schools in nearby districts also teach a certain AP course?  This data has recently be made public (at least it's new to me) so you can find out where classes are being taught.  The actual information for particular teachers is not revealed (for some important privacy issues), but this is still a great starting pointing for local and regional collaboration for teachers.  Also additional link will show you where AP institutes and workshops are going to be held in the future.   

 

Tags: APHG, training.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Human Geography CP
Scoop.it!

38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed

38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Some prime examples of fascinating maps." 


Via Seth Dixon, Ami Zach
more...
Jordan Macpherson's comment, November 4, 2013 11:50 PM
CRAZY!
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 2014 7:46 PM

This shows 38 maps of the world in completely different formats with different map projections and colorings. 

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 11:43 AM

Map number 7 shows what New Yorkers complain about the most in their beloved city. The complaints are split into noise, graffiti and litter. It is no surprise that most New Yorkers complain about noise in Manhattan, well because it is one of the largest cities in the world, of course there is going to be noise. And then looking on the outskirts of the main city in Manhattan there are mostly complaints about litter. The map is mostly blue in most areas. As for graffiti there are a couple pockets spread out which is where I’m assuming most gang activity takes place. Queens, the Bronx, and Brooklyn is where most of the graffiti is located according to this map. I liked this ma because it shows what you’re going to see or hear in certain places in the City area.    

Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

FRONTLINE/WORLD . Rough Cut . Seeds of Suicide | PBS

FRONTLINE/WORLD . Rough Cut . Seeds of Suicide | PBS | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Dennis V Thomas's insight:

Suicide by pesticide: It's an epidemic in India, where farmers try to keep up with the latest pest-resistant seeds only to find themselves trapped in a vicious cycle of pesticides that don't work, drought and debt.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Maps and the Geospatial Revolution

Maps and the Geospatial Revolution | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Learn how advances in geospatial technology and analytical methods have changed how we do everything, and discover how to make maps and analyze geographic patterns using the latest tools."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 21, 2013 1:35 PM

When I was a graduate student at Penn State, I was introduced to some great people and programs and I'm glad to see that the institution has continued to excel and be a leader.  You have probably heard of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Course) and been interested in seeing how this might change higher education in the future.  This MOOC is a free 5-week course designed to be an introduction to mapping, GIS and geospatial technologies so you don't need to be a specialists with a mapping background: it's for beginners.  I know that many geography teachers tell their students about GIS, but are afraid to teach with GIS because they are worried that it will be too hard.  This is an easy on-ramp to 21st century geospatial tools and any geography teacher hoping to modernize their skillset would do well to take this summer course fromthe Program of Online Geospatial Education at Penn State, taught by Dr. Anthony Robinson.  For more information on this, see this annoucement from Directions Magazine and from Penn State News.    


Tags: GIS, teacher training, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Leigha Tew's comment, November 6, 2013 9:41 PM
GIS is redefining mapping skills. In 21st Century education, it is crucial that we communicate GIS literacy in our geography curriculums and classrooms. As a geography teacher it is, therefore, also crucial that I have a thorough and sound knowledge of this field. This course could strongly assist such an understanding as professional development throughout my teaching career.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, locavore, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:59 PM

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM

So many articles about organic or genetically engineered foods are written with someone with a very defined position on the subject (much like abortion, gun control or other controversial topics).  This article is an attempt to separate out the good the bad and the ugly regarding genetically engineered foods.   

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 12:00 PM
unit 5
Scooped by Dennis V Thomas
Scoop.it!

The World Until Yesterday by Jared Diamond – review

The World Until Yesterday by Jared Diamond – review | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
Should we look to traditional societies to help us tweak our lives? Wade Davis takes issue with the whole idea
more...
No comment yet.