Advance Placement...
Follow
Find tag "globalization"
958 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism

EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
When horse meat was discovered in beef hamburgers in Ireland last month, governments, corporations and regulators assured a panicked public that it was complete

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, globalization, agribusiness.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
chris tobin's comment, February 28, 2013 3:44 PM
Yes the industry is all about money. The US needs to change their ways, especially in the beef and poultry business. Its mass production, inhumane to animals, and unhealthy .
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:12 PM

What trends in agribusiness are conveyed in this map?

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:30 PM

Why would someone want to do that to a horse? Horses are a great addition to the world because they can come in handy when it comes to pulling cargo and other objects also. Horses are having helped people for hundreds of years. I would go crazy if I found out I was eating horse meet. I am very surprised that those people from Ireland did not find out. There should really be an organization that checks the meet before it goes to supermarkets and other places. 

 

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Time-Space Compression

Time-Space Compression | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
In this age of fast travel and instant digital communications, we tend to forget that not so long ago, distances were subjectively very different.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 7:54 PM

With the development of modern equipment useful in maneuvering around the world, the time it took those living in the 1800's has been reduced to getting anywhere around the world with time spanning from 30- 24hrs. This of course has been made possible due to the development of roads, better boating constructions and air travel.

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:12 PM

Since 1800 the rate of travel has increased exponentially through the years. From the very beginning of travel, it would take close to a week just to get from the east coast to the middle of the United States. Through the use of railroads we have overcome the "time" factor and essentially eliminated it from playing a role in the way we travel. Today's advances in transportation has made seeing others much easier and most importantly it has developed a connected world that allows for transport of goods and services possible to such an extent that as citizens of the United states we are able to access almost anything we need from a day to day basis. A technology like this will continue to expand and grow to make the life of people that much easier.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 19, 7:26 PM

This belongs under the category of Major geographical concepts underlying the geographical perspective, because it involves the geographic concept of time-space compression since the 1800s, and how the time it takes to travel has decreased greatly since the 1800s. This affects many things like economy because of the difficulty of trading over distance.

 
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...

 

This article by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve the world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 

 

Technology-Phones mean freedomHealth-Healthy communities prosperEconomy-Green energy equals good businessEquality-Women ruleJustice-The fight for the future is now

 

Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
McDonald's plans to open the first in a series of all-vegetarian restaurants in India next year. But rest assured, in most locations around the world, meat will stay on the menu.

 

Many of the most successful global companies or brands use highly regional variations that are attuned to local cultural norms and customs.  The McAloo Tikki burger— which uses a spicy, fried potato-based patty — is the Indian McDonald's top seller.

 

Tags: Globalization, food, culture, unit 3 culture and SouthAsia.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 3:14 PM

I think it makes sense that there are not a lot of restaurants (less than 300) restaurants in India seeing as Indian food is not the most popular types of cuisine in the world. As much as I think McDonald's is disgusting, people would rather eat McDonald's than Indian food. It's not a problem to Indians and its Islamic individuals because cows are sacred to Hindus and Muslims don't eat pork so that leaves chicken to be eaten by Hindus and Muslims. McDonald's in the United States is different compared to McDonald's in India because India's McDonalds puts an Indian fusion on there food and they changed their menu to 50 percent vegetarian.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 9, 9:52 PM

When you typically think of a McDonald's, vegetarian is not what comes to mind. India plans on opening it's first vegetarian McDonald's since the majority of the population just simply does not even eat meat. There are already 271 of this restaurant in India already but they are looking for a new growth. Many Hindu's and Muslims don't eat pork, or cows because it is sacred to them. More chicken and vegetables will be served at this new restaurant and the older restaurants menus are 50% vegetarian. This is interesting to see because you do not think of fast food places being healthy at all. I think this is a great idea having different option for individuals who don't eat certain things. This is definitely going to be an attraction for not just people living in India but for tourists as well. It'll be a fun story to tell to say that you went to an all vegetarian McDonald's!

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 3:50 PM

It is often said that food is one of the best identifiers of a culture. What better way to define America than McDonalds, right? However, fueled by globalization, McDonalds has moved to several different countries around the world, including India. For religious reasons, the traditional American menu wouldn't fit well in the Indian diet, as most hindu people wouldn't jump at the chance to eat a quarter pound of greasy cow. Globalization and a desire for economic profit has fueled a change in the McDonalds menu in India as well as other countries. In order to succeed in the global market, a comp any must be willing to change to appeal to a more diverse client base. 

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 7:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 5:58 PM

Great info graphic on mega cities. 

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:39 PM

I think that language chances as culture changes, as time passed things get more modern. For example the past summer I went back to Dominican Republic, I haven’t been there for almost eight years. Even though I kept in contact with my family over there, I was very shock to find how much the Spanish that I knew in Dominican Republic have change so much. I don’t think is possible to keep a language pure, society is not the same as 100 years ago, I bet that certain words that were correct in the English dictionary don’t even exist anymore.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:21 PM

unit 3

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 16, 2:52 PM

I can't say I was a fan of Ms. Burnett's reporting style. First of all, implying that America is the only country that speaks English was a little blind. Second, the little chuckles and smirks she gives is a bit condescending. She came off rather harsh and confronting of the French. And I'm sure France isn't "declaring war on English" as they are probably doing this to other languages. Finally, her last remark referencing the song "Voulez vous coucher avec moi" was a tad inappropriate in my opinion. That being said, it's understandable for a country to try and protect its language. It's part of its culture and its heritage.

 

Languages change overtime through interaction with other people. Like Ms. Burnett pointed out, there are some French words that have become common use in the everyday American conversation like a la carte and bon voyage. It is impossible to keep a language "pure" or rid of other language influences in today's society. With all the interaction happening via the web and other media outlets, people are bound to pick up words from other languages to use in their lives. 

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Voices of China's Workers

TED Talks In the ongoing debate about globalization, what's been missing is the voices of workers -- the millions of people who migrate to factories in China and other emerging countries to make goods sold all over the world.


Our collective understanding of modern industrialization and globalization needs to go beyond the binary of "oppressors" and "victims."  This lecture explores the voices and lives of Chinese workers that we so often simply see as simply victims of a system, but are full of ambition and agency. 

 

Tags: industry, globalization, labor, China, TED. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 2:55 PM
In these Chinese factories, they don't view these jobs as harsh or poor treatment because this is better than how they would be doing back in their villages. They want these jobs so bad because they will give them a better life. Also, you have to remember that not all of these Chinese factory workers want to have an iPhone or a Coach purse or Nike shoes, because those things don't have any worth in their culture.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:26 PM

The plight of Chinese workers today is incredibly great. This TED talks explains the situations many in China find themselves in the terrible conditions they must work in. While us in the west see this as unthinkable China's model for success and expansion comes at the cost of their workforce who are subjugated to poor working conditions as very low pay. The real hope for this to change is for the nation as a whole to become wealthy enough that these workers will be able to demand fair wages and work environments. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:08 PM

These workers do see their jobs as opportunities. This video is a great eye opener for people who tend to fall into the trap of looking at globalization as a system of haves and have nots. 

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Global Closet Calculator

Global Closet Calculator | Advance Placement Human Geography | Scoop.it

The Global Closet Calculator aggregates the contents of your closet by origin to generate a map showing your unique global footprint, and puts you in charge of the global journey your stuff takes to get to you.

 

As I've worked now with the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance, I've had the good fortune to interact with the folks at National Geographic.  They are preparing for Geography Awareness Week (Nov 11-17th) with the theme "Declare your Interdependence!"  This newly released interactive feature allows students of all ages to see the global interconnections in their lives.   By analyzing the items in our closets (or any of the items that we consume), we can easily see that  our own personal geographies create a web of global interconnectedness.

 

Tags: NationalGeographic, GeographyEducation, K12, consumption, globalization. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:16 PM

A fun way for people to interact with there online closet and see how the world ties into our clothes!!

Rescooped by Dennis V Thomas from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Containerization Shaped Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 7, 2014 5:26 PM

I always enjoyed TED videos. What really struck me was the opening sentence of the video, "everything is everywhere these days." This is so true in so many ways. The video uses different examples that you can find in different stores from places all over the world. How many things can you could in your bedroom that says "Made in China" or some other place other than the US? This is very common as we all know. Products and goods come from all over the world and even over seas. This is a process that we call globalization. However, the video introduces a process called containerization. This process saves an ample amount of time for the workers. The process was a success. "shrinking the world and enlarging human choice."

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 27, 3:45 AM

I believe this video is very interesting. It tells us that everything we have today is thanks to globalization and the reason we have it so fast is because of shipping containers! In the video it told me that before my time it was impossible to get swordfish from Japan or cheeses from France, but now thanks to globalization it is all possible. Globalization is even behind the reason how our phones were made!