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Rescooped by Anette Due Rosenzweig from reNourishment
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Why Finland's Unorthodox Education System Is The Best In The World

Why Finland's Unorthodox Education System Is The Best In The World | ADR Coaching | Scoop.it
Since it implemented huge education reforms 40 years ago, the country's school system has consistently come in at the top for the international rankings for education systems.
But how do they do it?
It's simple — by going against the evaluation-driven, centralized model that much of the Western world uses.

 

It ignores the tactics its rivals hold so dear.

Via Alice Ruxton Abler
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Why the Left-Brain Right-Brain Myth Will Probably Never Die

Why the Left-Brain Right-Brain Myth Will Probably Never Die | ADR Coaching | Scoop.it
The myth has become a powerful metaphor, but it's one we should challenge...

Via Gina Stepp
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The 1st Conference on Positive Psychology Noted that the Happiness_China International Conference on Positive Psychology

The 1st Conference on Positive Psychology Noted that the Happiness_China International Conference on Positive Psychology | ADR Coaching | Scoop.it
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How will I know I have become a better storyteller? | Limor's Storytelling Agora

How will I know I have become a better storyteller? | Limor's Storytelling Agora | ADR Coaching | Scoop.it

"At the beginning, G didn’t know what to say."

I love this piece because of the question it asks! We get so focused on the doing doing doing of storytelling in our business, we rarely step back and ask ourselves, "How do I know I'm getting better at storytelling?"

This article comes from my colleague Limor Shiponi in Israel. Limor is one of the deep thinkers on the planet about storytelling and I highly prize her insights. It has been way too long since we've chatted and I miss hearing her magical voice and articulate thinking. In the meantime, I am delighted to share this piece with you.

Usually, if we are getting results in our business, we are happy. But if we don't periodically ask ourselves the question, "How will I know I have become a better storyteller?" our results -- when they fade (the normal ups and downs of business cycles) -- may be due our storytelling skills or something entirely different.

If you are not clear on how you'll know when you've become a better storyteller, in a down cycle you may start fixing the wrong things. Maybe your storytelling skills are fabulous but your marketing process is inconsistent. Maybe your marketing is awesome and your storytelling sucks. Without asking and paying attention to the question this article poses, you'll never know where to place your attention.

I ran across this article about 2 weeks ago and really took the time to ask myself this question. I came up with an answer and kept testing it out to make sure it was real. Here's my answer:

I know I will have become a better storyteller when I continually feel that resonance between me and my audience, and when people connect with me after they have heard one of my stories. I physically experience this band of gold and silver resonant energy linking me and my listeners together.

That's not very flowery language, but it does the trick for me. I can see several images in my minds eye of what this looks and feels like.

Now my experience can happen face-to-face or electronically. But of course, the best way to know if I've become a better storyteller is through live interaction. So practice practice practice your business stories with real people to build your skills and effectiveness.

OK -- that's me. Now it is your turn. How will you know you have become a better storyteller? What does that look and feel like for you?

Happy explorations :)

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


Via Karen Dietz
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Dear Tiger Moms: Here's why people perform better after receiving a compliment

Dear Tiger Moms: Here's why people perform better after receiving a compliment | ADR Coaching | Scoop.it
A team of Japanese scientists have found scientific proof that people doing exercises appear to perform better when another person compliments them.

 

~Via Annie Murphy Paul


Via Gina Stepp
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Rescooped by Anette Due Rosenzweig from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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The Emotional Cycle of Digital Interactivity

"I’ve long maintained that phenomena like “social media” are behaviors, more so than channels or applications or types of media inventory, what have you. There are extrinsic factors at play like market movements, various forms of scarcity, supply and demand levers, etc. and there are intrinsic factors like human emotion that are rarely, if ever, discussed when it comes to making investments in these types of ventures."

 

My colleague and fellow curator Jan L. Gordon originally shared this post and I thought it would be great to include here also.

 

Why? Because effective storytelling is about conveying emotions. Yet when we share our biz stories, what emotions should we be focusing on? It is easy to default to hope. Or confidence. 

 

What I like about this chart and post is that it addresses the common emotions people experience as they interact and share online -- both positive and negative.

 

It seems logical to me that in knowing this information, we should be paying attention to whether the emotions we are conveying in our biz stories online are connecting with the emotional experiences of people. This chart can help us figure it out.

 

Now, I wouldn't want to be limited to slavishly sticking to this chart. But it is a good place to begin!

 

As the author, Gunther Sonnenfeld says, "I believe that any great technology venture (any great company, really) must provide doors to perception and discovery that look well beyond transactional or even relationship benefits to some degree." Yeah! Treating business storytelling as purely transactional or relational is only the first rung of effectiveness.

 

And don't forget to read the comments at the end of the post. They are chock full of great insights and discussion about online storytelling, branding, and emotion.

 

Thank you Jan for finding this gem! @janlgordon

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Jack Patterson, Dennis T OConnor, Gust MEES, Gianfranco D'Aversa, Louise Robinson-Lay, Rosário Durão, Fred Zimny, janlgordon, Karen Dietz
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ghbrett's comment, November 2, 2012 11:43 AM
Thanks Jumun Gimm for this pointer!
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Kelly Eckert—Coaching for Visionaries, Performers & Transformational Leaders

Kelly Eckert—Coaching for Visionaries, Performers & Transformational Leaders | ADR Coaching | Scoop.it
You must transform your mindset before you transform your life.
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American Friends of Tel Aviv University: Are Schizophrenia and Autism Close Relations?

American Friends of Tel Aviv University: Are Schizophrenia and Autism Close Relations? | ADR Coaching | Scoop.it

New research by Dr. Mark Weiser of Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and the Sheba Medical Center has revealed that Autism Spectrum Disorder appears share a root cause with other mental illnesses, including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

 

Studying extensive databases in Israel and Sweden, the researchers discovered that the two illnesses had a genetic link, representing a heightened risk within families. They found that people who have a schizophrenic sibling are 12 times more likely to have autism than those with no schizophrenia in the family. The presence of bipolar disorder in a sibling showed a similar pattern of association, but to a lesser degree.

 

A scientific leap forward, this study sheds new light on the genetics of these disorders. The results will help scientists better understand the genetics of mental illness, says Dr. Weiser, and may prove to be a fruitful direction for future research. The findings have been published in the Archives of General Psychiatry.


Via Gina Stepp
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