Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior
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Digital Peer Interactions Affect Risk Taking in Young Adults - MacLean - 2013 - Journal of Research on Adolescence - Wiley Online Library

Digital Peer Interactions Affect Risk Taking in Young Adults - MacLean - 2013 - Journal of Research on Adolescence - Wiley Online Library | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it

Digital interactions are an increasingly common communication method among young adults, but little is known about whether such remote exchanges influence riskiness. The current study examined whether observing and interacting with, versus simply observing, a digital peer affect risk taking in young adults aged 18–25. Participants who remotely viewed risky behavior by a peer or computer increased risk taking; however, compared to a control condition, only exposure to risk-encouraging messages from a digital peer resulted in sustained risk-taking behavior. These findings suggest that short text-based messages from a risk-encouraging digital peer can influence risk-taking behavior in young adults. Given the rapid proliferation of digital communication among this age group, these results highlight a potentially important source of peer influence on risky behavior.


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Seeing the Toll, Schools Revise Zero Tolerance

Seeing the Toll, Schools Revise Zero Tolerance | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it
School districts around the country are rethinking their responses to minor offenses by students amid mounting evidence of the downside of get-tough policies.

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Suicidality test being brought to market

Suicidality test being brought to market | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it
A new test should help doctors to decrease the risk of suicidality in patients treated with antidepressants who show certain gene markers. Researchers plan to launch the test immediately as a laboratory developed test.

Via Lisa Medoff
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When being called 'incredibly good' is bad for children

When being called 'incredibly good' is bad for children | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it
Parents and other adults heap the highest praise on children who are most likely to be hurt by the compliments, a new study finds.

Via Lisa Medoff
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Nowhere to Go: Mentally ill youth in crisis

Nowhere to Go: Mentally ill youth in crisis | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it
Scott Pelley reports on severe shortcomings in the state of mental health care for young people in the U.S.

Via Lisa Medoff
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A Journey Through Darkness - My Life With Chronic Depression - NYTimes.com

A Journey Through Darkness - My Life With Chronic Depression - NYTimes.com | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it
What one woman learned from four decades of psychotherapy, three hospital stays and the ever-present fear of returning to the psychological dungeon.

Via Lisa Medoff
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Rescooped by Rebekah Sypniewski from Parenting Styles 2.0
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ScienceDirect.com - Journal of Adolescent Health - Examining the relationship between adolescent sexual Risk-Taking and perceptions of monitoring, communication, and parenting styles


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Beyond Scared Straight -Juvenile Justice Reform: Does the Adolescent Brain Make Risk Taking Inevitable? A Skeptical Appraisal

Beyond Scared Straight -Juvenile Justice Reform: Does the Adolescent Brain Make Risk Taking Inevitable? A Skeptical Appraisal | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it

Increasingly influential theories hold that the “teenage brain” suffers cognitive flaws that impel risk taking. Aside from warnings by leading researchers that brain science is insufficiently advanced to yield definitive findings that teenage behaviors are internally driven, the belief that adolescents take excessive risks has been developed using biased measures and without first ruling out alternative external explanations. In fact, the best demographic, crime, and health statistics show that adolescents do not take excessive risks compared to adults, adolescent risks are associated much more significantly with conditions of poverty and corresponding adult behaviors than with uniquely adolescent factors, and middle-aged adults exposed to the same high poverty levels as American youth display similar or higher levels of crime, violent death, firearms mortality, traffic fatalities, and other behaviors conventionally associates with adolescents. “Teenage brain” theories and the views of youth and policies they entail require much more rigorous scrutiny than they have received to date.


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Developmental changes in effects of risk and valence on adolescent decision-making

Interesting paper exploring the detail of adolescent risk taking


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Meaningful Youth Engagement as a Protective Factor for Youth Suicidal Ideation - Armstrong - 2013 - Journal of Research on Adolescence - Wiley Online Library

Meaningful Youth Engagement as a Protective Factor for Youth Suicidal Ideation - Armstrong - 2013 - Journal of Research on Adolescence - Wiley Online Library | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it

Youth suicide is a leading cause of mortality. Greater still is the prevalence of suicidal behavior and ideation. In this study with 813 secondary school students, we explored youth engagement in structured extracurricular activities as a possible protective factor for suicidal ideation. Personally meaningful youth engagement significantly moderated the relationships between depressive symptoms, risk behaviors, self-esteem, and social support in the prediction of suicidal ideation. Specifically, the more meaning found in engagement, the less likely youth were to report suicidal thoughts in spite of risk factors. Acknowledging limitations, a focus on engaging youth in well-selected activities of interest might represent a nonstigmatizing approach to universal prevention. Further research into the mechanisms of such an approach is warranted.


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Kevin Breel: Confessions of a depressed comic | Video on TED.com

Kevin Breel didn't look like a depressed kid: team captain, at every party, funny and confident. But he tells the story of the night he realized that -- to save his own life -- he needed to say four simple words.

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Inner City Truth 3

Inner City Truth 3 | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it

Inner City Truth 3 (ICT3) is the third installment of a national study of youth and young adults. This edition features findings from more than 1,700 African Americans and Latinos, ages 16 to 20. Participants were from Los Angeles/Long Beach; Oakland/Richmond; Chicago; Philadelphia; and Atlanta. ICT3 insights go beyond the demographic profiles, attitudes and behaviors of youth. It also captures the “why” behind youth behavior and choices, along with highlighting trends that indicate what comes next.


Via Lisa Medoff
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Controversy plagues school mental health screening

Controversy plagues school mental health screening | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it
As stories about increasing school violence dominate headlines, experts say many teens are struggling with untreated mental illness.

Via Lisa Medoff
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That teenage feeling

That teenage feeling | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it
Harvard researchers may have found biological clues to quirky adolescent behavior.

Via Lisa Medoff
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The Influence of Environment - The Science of Adolescent Risk-Taking: Workshop Report - NCBI Bookshelf

The Influence of Environment - The Science of Adolescent Risk-Taking: Workshop Report - NCBI Bookshelf | Adolescent Risk Taking Behavior | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Rebekah Sypniewski from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Sarah-Jayne Blakemore: The mysterious workings of the adolescent brain | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Why do teenagers seem so much more impulsive, so much less self-aware than grown-ups?

 

 

 

 

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An intriguing discussion of brain development research that may have profound importance in teaching across the curricula and in the case of this blog's focus, particularly in the teaching of literature.

 

Just a tease... The speaker makes reference to "The Winter's Tale" where Shakespeare describes adoblescence as follows: "I would there were no age between ten and three-and-twenty, or that youth would sleep out the rest; for there is nothing in between but getting wenches with child, wronging the ancientry, stealing, fighting...Having said that, would any but these boiled brains of nineteen and two-and-twenty hunt in this weather?"

 

It provides a laugh line amongst the audience but Blakemore goes on to discuss recent brain research evidence that indicates distinct differences in the still developing adolescent brain directly related to risk taking, emotion processing and reward processing. 

 

Blakemore also noted that it may be as of yet incomplete brain development in particular areas of the brain that may explain limitations in adolescent "ability to take into account someone else's perspective." 

 

And, of course, "point of view" is one of the core elements of literary analysis. It isn't that adolescents can not emphasize; it's more that they do so on less complex levels. I remember well how often while discussing the motives that might explain a character's actions, I'd ask a question phrased as follows, "So, if you were wearing so-and-so's shoes, what do you think you would do in this situation?" And quite often I would get a response to a very different question. I'd essentially get a response as though I'd asked the question, "If so-and-so was wearing your shoes, what do you think he/she would do in this situation?" 

 

Of course in the very writing of this point I can see that the phrasing of my question may well be or at least be perceivable as being ambiguous. Yet, in so many cases responses quite frequently were more likely to reflect answers to questions like "If Huck (or Holden, or Hamlet) were you wnat would he do?" than "If you were Huck (or Holden or Hamlet) what would you do?"

 

And I remember now with the kind of embarrassment that reflection sometimes brings into clearer focus, too often wondering if I was so-self-centered when I was their age. Assuming, therefore that they're difficulty in feeling empathy and compassion was their fault and therefore a reason to be disappointed, perhaps even annoyed by the student's "inability" to recognize that not everyone sees the world the way they do.

 

Blakemore's interesting explanation of this phenomenon beginning at about the 7 minute mark is an eye openers in demonstrating this point from a point of view I had not taken into consideration myself when I "blamed the kid" for self-centered tendencies.

 

Lest my thoughts be misunderstood, I am NOT building a case against teaching point of view. For all I know the very efforts we make in attempts to use literature in order to help our students develop empathy and thereby compassion, may be like doing push ups in PE classes. They may be the very exercises that build the brain's "strength" LITERALLY. (hmmm, I'm wondering if that's another play on words that I'm so fond of)  

 

Might it be that our efforts are actually promoting brain development at a biological level? That "late bloomers" are just that. They are not less intelligent, they may not even be lazy or slow to find their way. They may simply be moving along the brain development stages of adolescence at a different pace, that may well also be absolutely normal and not a sign of intellectual limitations. 

 

I kind of hope there's some truth in my contemplations. If so, it would certainly go a long way towards explaining my own "late blooming." Okay, perhaps I was immature and foolish, but maybe, just maybe, I wasn't any "dumber" or lazier" than my "smarter" contemporaries after all. 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~


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Peers Increase Adolescent Risk Taking Even When the Probabilities of Negative Outcomes are Known


Via Lisa Medoff
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Lisa Medoff's curator insight, January 23, 2014 7:06 PM

The majority of adolescent risk taking occurs in the presence of peers, and recent research suggests that the presence of peers may alter how the potential rewards and costs of a decision are valuated or perceived. The current study further explores this notion by investigating how peer observation affects adolescent risk taking when the information necessary to make an informed decision is explicitly provided. We used a novel probabilistic gambling task in which participants decided whether to play or pass on a series of offers for which the reward and loss outcome probabilities were made explicit. Adolescent participants completed the task either alone or under the belief that they were being observed by an unknown peer in a neighboring room. Participants who believed a peer was observing them chose to gamble more often than participants who completed the task alone, and this effect was most evident for decisions with a greater probability of loss. These results suggest that the presence of peers can increase risk taking among adolescents even when specific information regarding the likelihood of positive and negative outcomes is provided. The findings expand our understanding of how peers influence adolescent decision making and have important implications regarding the value of educational programs aimed at reducing risky behaviors during adolescence.

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A social neuroscience take on adolescent risk taking

Dr. Lawrence Steinberg, the Distinguished University Professor and Laura H. Carnell Professor of Psychology at Temple University, presents the results of his...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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