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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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15 More Apps To Create Books On The iPad

15 More Apps To Create Books On The iPad | AdLit | Scoop.it
15 More Apps To Create Books On The iPad

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 4, 2013 10:13 AM

Got iPads? Teach writing and reading?

 

Here you go!

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

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Change How Kids Learn To Read | OpenDoor Flathead

Change How Kids Learn To Read | OpenDoor Flathead | AdLit | Scoop.it

... of the Fund for Public Schools under former Chancellor of New York's Department of Education, Joel Klein, and Caroline Kennedy, before becoming senior advisor to David Coleman at Student Achievement Partners (SAP).


Via Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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10 amazing book visualizations

10 amazing book visualizations | AdLit | Scoop.it
A list of the most creative book visualizations and book-related images.

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Jenna Krambeck's curator insight, August 3, 2013 11:25 PM

Interesting infographics to showcase literary ideas. 

Tina Stock's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:39 PM

Ok - I'll admit that this isn't really about marketing, but I am a total book geek, and this just made me happy.  Enjoy!

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iPad fun
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24 Educational iPad Apps for Kids in Reading & Writing « Imagination Soup | Fun Learning and Play Activities for Kids

24 Educational iPad Apps for Kids in Reading & Writing « Imagination Soup | Fun Learning and Play Activities for Kids | AdLit | Scoop.it
As I started a go-to list of the best educational iPad apps for kids, the list got so long, I split up my posts into categories.

Via Lisa Johnson , Stacey Watters
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Apps for the Dysgraphic Student
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Apps for Students | Dysgraphia & Writing Difficulties - NCLD

Apps for Students | Dysgraphia & Writing Difficulties - NCLD | AdLit | Scoop.it
Apps can help students and adults who have learning disabilities like dysgraphia or dyslexia with their written expression. These are LD-friendly.

Via Craig Tunks, Caroline Northrup
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Craig Tunks's curator insight, February 2, 2013 9:50 PM

I have used a number of these Apps and they are all excellent when used with the right student.  Worthwhile to take a glance at.

 

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Literacy Nuggets
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The top 10 Internet sources college students use for writing may depress you

The top 10 Internet sources college students use for writing may depress you | AdLit | Scoop.it
Paper mills and cheat sites still make up nearly a quarter of sources, according to Turnitin.

Via Erin Raney
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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The Millions : The Problem With Summer Reading

The Millions : The Problem With Summer Reading | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Summer reading assignments and reading quizzes and book reports don’t teach our students how to be readers. They teach them that reading is a school-centered activity. That it is a chore. That they aren’t good at it if they can’t remember insignificant plot points. These assignments set students up to cheat, or to fail, and always to regard reading as a drag."


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 2, 2013 2:36 PM

Sometimes I try to create a virtual Venn Diagram showing the intersection between what it is that I love about reading great literature and what it is that we do as literary educators to encourage life-long reading and to measure our success in creating life-long readers.

 

I don't do this often as it can be a bit depressing. 

 

And sometimes, I wonder what would happen if some sort of "Opinion-Amnesia" happened in English Departments. What if every colleague at the department meetings, whether they had previously held opinions about what was worth teaching and how to effectively teach literature that had been in alignment with my own previously held opinions or not, had to suddenly start over and somehow rebuild and replace their ideas and beliefs regarding best practice in literary reading education?

 

I have no doubt that the vast majority of Literary Reading educators, whether their sense of best practice mirrored my own or was vastly different from my own are well-intended and dedicated to doing what they have come to believe is best for their students.

 

I also have no doubt that as my style and practice was incredibly effective for many of my students, that it at the same time not incredibly effective for other students who found my colleagues with very different styles and practices than my own to be much more effective.

 

So where might a well-intended English Department begin the process of rediscovering a personal opinion set of best practice?

 

What would be the essential question that would lead to refreshing a skill-set for effective literary reading education.

 

There would probably be a fairly universal agreement that learning HOW to read would be a universal goal. But, agreeing upon the best practice for for HOW to teach HOW to read would quickly become a matter for revisiting the many reasons behind decisions to be made on HOW to teach HOW to read.

 

And, given the premise that we would all be suffering from "Opinion-Abnesia" it wouldn't be possible to simply haul out our previous opinions on the matter. We'd actually have to revisit that essential question and revisit our reasoning behind our opinions.

 

After the essential questions associated with how to teach how to read. I'd jump right to what I think is at least an equally important essential question? WHY do we teach literary reading? Do we really believe that Shakespeare is essential? (And, I LOVE SHAKESPEARE) If Shakespeare is essential, why? And, are we satisfied with the success rate we have when teaching Shakespeare? 

 

Is our goal to create life-long readers or the next generation of English majors? 

 

If we asked everyone of our students what they thought the essential values of literary reading are, would they respond in sufficient numbers in ways we would hope to hear.

 

Well, I'm going on and on about ideas that are at the core of building an effective literary reading program. And, of course the ideas are far too important to dismiss as either easily dismissable or easily agreeable.

 

But, one last thought about this article's position on Summer Reading...

 

Is it possible to draw conclusions about summer reading? If we are truly advocates of life-long reading as a goal, then in a sense the question is ludicrous. Of course students should be reading during the summer. The question is really in the design of the integration of summer reading into literary reading educational practice. And, I'd suggest that if the design is misguided that summer reading may be responsible for killing any interest in reading among those students who haven't yet discovered sufficient reason to be literary readers beyond avoiding the hassles of passing tests.

 

And by the way, I'm not opposed to having to demonstrate that reading has been done but if passing the test trumps or drowns actually developing an engaged perception of the true value of literary reading as a life-long practice, then as well-intended as we may be, we may be inadvertently contributing to the misconception that hitting the bull's eye on the test is more important than discovering how to hit bulls' eyes in life's great challenges.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Critical thinking and Creativity in class
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20 Reflective Questions To Help Students Respond To Common Core Texts

20 Reflective Questions To Help Students Respond To Common Core Texts | AdLit | Scoop.it

"The Common Core Standards represent a shift in the traditional instruction of English-Language Arts in the average American public school K-12 classroom. While there are several differences in the new standards, one of the most interesting (in addition to the expectation of technology integration) is the trend from literary to non-fiction texts."


Via Beth Dichter, Marylin Alvarez
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 1, 2013 7:05 PM

This could be used as a great anchor chart for students to see when when reading text and preparing to respond to the text. Although the title says 20 questions I count 21 questions on this visual, questions that are require critical thinking skills, questions that may be used with a variety of texts (as required by Common Core).

The questions are in three categories (information below quoted from the article):

* Within the text - summaries, sequence of events, conflict/resolution, etc

* Beyond the text - Inferencing, implicit ideas, evaluation, etc.

* About the text - Author purpose, author style, characterization, etc.

The post also relates the areas to Bloom's Taxonomy. You might also look at the question relative to Depth of Knowledge.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, August 3, 2013 4:45 AM

Critical thinking about your story line ~

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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WATCH: 79 Words You're Probably Saying Wrong

WATCH: 79 Words You're Probably Saying Wrong | AdLit | Scoop.it
Did you know that "pinochle" is pronounced "pea-knuckle?" Or that the "e" isn't pronounced in the word "forte?"

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 1, 2013 2:14 PM

Many great examples shared in a rapid-fire humorous fashion. Some very contemporary references such as pronunciations of celebrity names and many more traditional pronunciation stumbling blocks worthy of any English classroom.

 

I even have to admit that I learned a few things myself. I've always stumbled over "forte." Not confident about how many syllables the word has when spoken. 

 

The answer was quite intriguing to say the least.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core State Standards SMUSD
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Cold Versus Warm Close Reading: Stamina and the Accumulation of Misdirection

 But it is much easier to recruit students to focus on tasks that will build their skills by starting with engaging questions, appealing topics, and important issues.  In my opinion, those are the hooks on which the new and challenging tasks can best be hung.


Via Mary Reilley Clark
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Jay Bansbach's curator insight, July 31, 2013 9:21 AM

Very insightful!

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Using Quantitative Measures of Text Complexity in Classroom Instruction: What’s Appropriate? What’s Not? » TextProject

Using Quantitative Measures of Text Complexity in Classroom Instruction: What’s Appropriate? What’s Not? » TextProject | AdLit | Scoop.it
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from CCSS News Curated by Core2Class
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For Libraries, the Common Core Presents Extraordinary Opportunity

For Libraries, the Common Core Presents Extraordinary Opportunity | AdLit | Scoop.it

The Common Core State Standards are poised to bring some of the most meaningful changes to our education system in a generation, some observers say, and with the emphasis on literacy, resources, and critical thinking, it’s no surprise that librarians are embracing the Common Core as an extraordinary opportunity.


Via Deb Gardner
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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16 Fancy Literary Techniques Explained By Disney

16 Fancy Literary Techniques Explained By Disney | AdLit | Scoop.it
Because why waste money on an English degree when you can just watch Disney movies?

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 4, 2013 10:03 AM

A challenge...

 

How much more than what is so clearly discussed in this article does EVERY student need to know about literary devices before we send them out into "the real world"?

 

I am not suggesting the the essence of understanding literary devices is unimportant. But rather that the basics of literary devices are so clearly explained here, that the vast majority of students might well "get it" and "get it well enough" to begin seeing these devices at play in the increasingly challenging readings expected of them in the upper grades. 

 

I've often, and as recently as in yesterday's post, posed a concern about the degree to which literary reading instruction succeeds or fails in creating life-long readers. Or, put more bluntly, the degree to which literary reading instruction encourages or discourages the creation of life-long readers.

 

As English majors, I'm certain (?) that none of us could even imagine what is lost in reading among those who did not major in English and therefore are completely oblivious to the literary value of "Anagnorisis" in a well-crafted story.

 

"A-nag-or-is-it-what"?

 

No! "Anagnorisis," You know when a character who doesn't get it finally gets it. A character's important realization that he or she hadn't known what he or he hadn't known. You know. That sort of thing.

 

Of course, I'm cherry-picking one of the much more obtuse literary devices to make my point. Truth be told, I'm not sure that "Anagnorisis" is a term that I had ever run across before. And, yet it is the name, apparently, for a literary device that has been at the heart of discussion starters in my and probably your classrooms forever.

 

I've wondered aloud about whether our focus in literary analysis ought to be built upon a more delicate or fine-tuned balance between encouraging many more of our graduates to continue reading literature as an ongoing life practice and encouraging at least some of our graduates to have become so engaged in literary reading that they go on to major in English and even pick up the sacred torch of teaching literature.

 

Though both goals are worthy, I worry about the extent to which the latter focus might be counterproductive and dare I say fatal in the pursuit of the former focus for far too many of our students.

 

I have no doubt that the skills and appreciation for literary reading associated with literary scholarship can play a large role in achieving both goals. While at the same time, i can not help but be concerned about the point at which the extensive attention to the scholarly side of literary analysis also plays a major role in the declining interest in reading of many of our students as they transition from childhood stories to the literary challenges associated with stories taught in upper grades that have to be dissected at levels leaving too many students with a sense that the value of literary reading is trumped completely by the difficulty of seeing what it is that their teachers seem to see between, rather than in the lines "of last night's reading."

 

So even as a high school teacher, I might begin a course with this article as a discussion starter, followed by a brainstorming session regarding how many stories in print OR film OR around the Thanksgiving table when the old folks are retelling those old stories they enjoy telling and hearing no matter how many times they've sat round the Thanksgiving table boring the children to death with those old "alreday heard that one about a million times" stories.

 

I know my students, whether they were future English majors or not, could fill a few class sessions "seeing" these literary devices at play in all sorts of stories they had encountered.

 

And, by the way, as" just an aside," do you remember how much you looked forward to being promoted from the children's table at Thanksgiving to the grown ups' table? 

 

How great was that going to be?

 

hmmm... maybe ""Anagnorisis" is a more valuable literary device than I had thought it was way back when I began jotting down my thoughts on this artice.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips is an educational nonprofit

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Tech & Education
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Grammar jokes for English class

Grammar jokes for English class | AdLit | Scoop.it
Know any good English grammar jokes? We do! Here are some of our favorites. Tense jokes: Why was six afraid of seven? Because seven ate nine! What happened when the past, the present, and the futur...

Via William Machado
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from best activities to assess reading comprehension
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Unwinding A Circular Plot: Prediction Strategies in Reading and Writing - ReadWriteThink

Unwinding A Circular Plot: Prediction Strategies in Reading and Writing - ReadWriteThink | AdLit | Scoop.it
Students use graphic organizers to explore plot in circular stories while focusing on prediction and sequencing. After exploring the features of circular plot stories, students write their own stories.

Via Ximena Montilla Arreaza, Jessica Porras
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from BiographyZ
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Documenting Reading and Writing with Doodlecast App

Documenting Reading and Writing with Doodlecast App | AdLit | Scoop.it
The more I use Doodlecast Pro ($2.99) the more I like this app. My favorite app for recording audio on a screen has always been Educreations (Free) because of the simplicity of the app. The two thi...

Via Matt Gomez, Melissa Zgorzelski
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening Activities or Strategies for Elementary School
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Strategies for teaching reading fluency - by Frances Stanford - Helium

Being able to read fluently means that children can read sentences smoothly. They do not have to stop after each word nor do they struggle with wo..., Frances Stanford

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from college and career ready
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FREE Common Core Vocabulary: Using Context Clues {Grades 2-5}

FREE Common Core Vocabulary: Using Context Clues {Grades 2-5} | AdLit | Scoop.it
FREE! Common Core Vocabulary Graphic Organizers for Grades 2-5: Using Context Clues to Determine Meaning and Making Inferences This is a one-page sample from

Via Tracee Orman, Lynnette Van Dyke
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✌ A Glossary of Gestures for Critical Discussion

✌ A Glossary of Gestures for Critical Discussion | AdLit | Scoop.it
✌ Reading "A Glossary of Gestures for Critical Discussion" http://t.co/n2yh9rpztX
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Literacy Partners in the Science Classroom

Literacy Partners in the Science Classroom | AdLit | Scoop.it
By pairing students with common abilities and goals, teachers build teams that will come together to better understand texts and literature. Learn how one high school teacher pairs her Literacy Partners in her Physics class.
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Teacher's work rom the Teaching Channel

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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Transforming Reluctant Readers

"They come into your library or classroom and they challenge you, they don't like reading. What can you do? Where do you look for ideas?What books are recommended by school librarians to turn things around? Ideas and suggestions here."


Via Heather Stapleton
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BJ Neary's curator insight, August 6, 2013 9:18 PM

This slideshare is awesome chock full of great ideas to get and keep kids reading!

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32 Characteristics Of High-Performing Classrooms

32 Characteristics Of High-Performing Classrooms | AdLit | Scoop.it

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Kimberly House's curator insight, August 11, 2013 8:13 AM

Some good reminders in here.

Dafina Westbrooks's curator insight, August 12, 2013 10:04 AM

More like this please!

Debbie Goodis's curator insight, October 19, 2013 11:16 AM

Can these posters be purchased and printed?