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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Common Core State Standards Initiative - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Common Core State Standards Initiative is a U.S. education initiative that seeks to bring diverse state curricula into alignment with each other by following the principles of standards-based education reform. The initiative is sponsored by the National Governors Association (NGA) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). The past twenty years in the U.S. have also been termed the "Accountability Movement," as states are being held to mandatory tests of student achievement, which are expected to demonstrate a common core of knowledge that all citizens should have to be successful in this country.[1] As part of this overarching education reform movement, the nation’s governors and corporate leaders founded Achieve, Inc. in 1996 as a bi-partisan organization to raise academic standards, graduation requirements, improve assessments, and strengthen accountability in all 50 states.[2] The initial motivation for the development of the Common Core State Standards was part of the American Diploma Project (ADP).[3]

A report titled, “Ready or Not: Creating a High School Diploma That Counts,” from 2004 found that both employers and colleges are demanding more of high school graduates than in the past.[4] According to Achieve, Inc., “current high-school exit expectations fall well short of [employer and college] demands.”[5] The report explains that the major problem currently facing the American school system is that high school graduates were not provided with the skills and knowledge they needed to succeed.[5] "While students and their parents may still believe that the diploma reflects adequate preparation for the intellectual demands of adult life, in reality it falls far short of this common-sense goal." (page 1). The report continues that the diploma itself lost its value because graduates could not compete successfully beyond high school,[5] and that the solution to this problem is a common set of rigorous standards.

Announced on June 1, 2009,[6] the initiative's stated purpose is to "provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them."[7] Additionally, "The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers," which will place American students in a position in which they can compete in a global economy.[7] Forty-five of the fifty states in the United States are members of the initiative, with the states of Texas, Virginia, Alaska, Nebraska and Minnesota not adopting the initiative at a state level.[8]

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Essentials for Effective Reading Instruction | RTI Action Network

Essentials for Effective Reading Instruction | RTI Action Network | AdLit | Scoop.it
RTINetwork.org guides educators and families in the effective implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) as a means to improve educational outcomes for all students.

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The Traveler | Inspiring Short Stories

The Traveler | Inspiring Short Stories | AdLit | Scoop.it
The Traveler, inspirational short story reminding us to grab every opportunity we are offered. Never let the opportunity down.

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Language Arts–What does “revise” mean? « Clipboards

Language Arts–What does “revise” mean? « Clipboards | AdLit | Scoop.it
In language arts class today, we had to “revise” yesterday's D.O.L. (see the link for an explanation–scroll down to the bottom for an example). You'll be asked to revise future D.O.L. sentences, as well, so be prepared for that.

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FREE LANGUAGE ARTS LESSON - “Drawing Inferences Printable

FREE LANGUAGE ARTS LESSON - “Drawing Inferences Printable | AdLit | Scoop.it
FREE LANGUAGE ARTS LESSON - “Drawing Inferences Printable Bookmarks and Worksheet”. by Jen Bengel ..... Secondary Solutions | Ideas, tips, and tools for the middle and high school English Language Arts teacher ...

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Respectful Reading Behaviors and Building Stamina

Respectful Reading Behaviors and Building Stamina | AdLit | Scoop.it
I introduced reading stamina with the book Dex The Heart of a Hero. Dex works to build up his exercising stamina so that he can be a super hero. He researches and trains and gradually gets stronger and able to do more ...

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20 Best Websites to Download Free eBooks

20 Best Websites to Download Free eBooks | AdLit | Scoop.it
With all the great digital technology around these days, we don’t need a tree to make a book. More and more of us are choosing the convenience of digital content over actual books, CDs, DVD and Blu-ray discs as time passes. And as with everything that comes in digital – there’s a plethora of free options available. We can download eBooks onto our kindles, iPads, iPod, phones, laptops… the list is endless. Here’s a useful collection of sites and sources for getting free eBooks (yes, free!) for all of you virtual bookworms.

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Anne Whaits's curator insight, January 25, 2013 2:29 PM

Check the comments for other useful links to free ebooks such as http://www.ebooks-forfree.com./

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Adolescent Lit

Young adult literature is anything that readers from the age of 12 -18 choose to read, not necessarily something they have been assigned to read.  It is often referred to as "YA" literature so as not to sound condescending (i.e.  "here is a book that was written for you kids..."),  Some think of it as  literature written for and published specifically for young adults. Whether or not they have read it on their own purely for enjoyment, or have been assigned to read it in a class, makes no difference. 

During the last half of the 20th century, young adult literature has developed as a distinct unit of publishing. There is a market for stories especially written for youth. There is also doom and gloom talk of young people no longer reading like they used to, that there are too many other interests, including the media and the Internet, that take time away from reading activities. 

There is a wide variety of literature for young adults.  The late sixties saw distinct changes in publishing for young adults with the publication of The Pigman, by Paul Zindel, in 1968, and The Outsiders, by S.E.Hinton, in 1967.  

Seven Characteristics of Young Adult Literature:YA authors write from the viewpoint of young people"I want the credit." In many YA novels the parents or other authority figures are absent. The characters are forced to confront their problems on their own.The literature is fast-paced, the stories told as a frantic pace with emphasis on powerful images.YA literature involves a variety of genres and subjects, with about half being contemporary realistic fiction.It iincludes stories about characters from many different ethnic and cultural groups. The characters are no longer all white, middle class characters. There are fewer taboos about what can be included.YA books are basically optimistic with characters making worthy accomplishments. The characters are faced with challenges, which earn the reader's respect, even if they don't succeed. The characters show change and growth.Successful young adult novels deal with emotions that are important to young people.Developmental Tasks and Needs

In 1972, Robert J. Havinghurst published Developmental Tasks and Education, in which he outlined eight developmental tasks young people are experiencing.  These tasks should be kept in mind when reading YA lit.  

Acquiring more mature social skills.Achieving a masculine or feminine sex role.Accepting the changes in one's body, using the body effectively, and accepting one's physique.Achieving emotional independence from parents and other adults.Preparing for sex, marriage, and parenthood.Selecting and preparing for an occupation.Developing a personal ideology and ethical standards.Assuming membership in the larger community.

An alternative point of view is provided by The Center for Early Adolescence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  They list seven developmental needs (instead of tasks) of young adults.  They also provide a framework to better understand the YA genre.

Physical activityCompetence and AchievementSelf-definitionCreative expressionPositive social interactions with peers and adultsStructure and clear limitsMeaningful participationStages of Literary Appreciation

It is thought that personal attitudes and reading, listening and watching skills are all part of literary appreciation and that this appreciation is developed in stages -- that readers continually add on to them, but do not drop any previous stages.  This is another important framework to consider when looking at YA literature.  

Understanding that pleasure and profit come from literature.

Learning to read.

Losing oneself in a story

Finding oneself in a story

Venturing beyond themselves

Reading widely

AestheticAppreciation of YA Literature Genres

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Successful Student Book Review Blogging

Vimeo is the home for high-quality videos and the people who love them.

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Books Recognized for Social-Emotional Lessons

Books Recognized for Social-Emotional Lessons | AdLit | Scoop.it
Education Week staff writer Nirvi Shah and contributing writer Ross Brenneman explore some of the nonacademic issues that bear on students’ learning.

 

Wanda Petronski has a weird name and wears the same old faded blue dress to school every day—and her Connecticut classmates don't let the little Polish girl forget it for a second. She tells her classmates she has a hundred beautiful dresses at home, but they don't believe her. Eventually, her classmates realize the error of their bullying ways, but Wanda has already left school.

 

The message in The Hundred Dresses, a Newbery Honor book in 1945, is still so powerful, the book was named the best of 25 books that connect children to social and emotional learning by the Open Circle Program at Wellesley Centers for Women.

The center, which helps teachers work with elementary-age children to acquire skills to build and maintain positive relationships, came up with the top 25 list (PDF) as part of the celebration of its 25th anniversary.

The Open Circle educators listed books that stand out as being especially authentic and memorable and are geared toward children in kindergarten through 5th grades. They deal with self-awareness, self-management, empathy, dealing with conflict, and problem-solving.

 

"Books can illustrate what an actual emotion looks like and then links that emotion to a word like 'sad', 'bad', or 'happy' with illustrations or actual photographs," said Peg Sawyer, an Open Circle trainer and coach. "A book related to responsible decisionmaking gives children the opportunity to talk about what the behaviors are that help them develop relationships, and conversely, what are the behaviors that get in the way of the relationship."

Also on the organization's list: Joey Pigza Swallowed the Key, about a boy who takes Ritalin and doesn't always make the best choices. And in Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy, two children in Maine strike up an unlikely friendship and fight to save one of their communities.

As for Wanda Petronski, (SPOILER ALERT!) one of her shy classmates soon realizes the effects of the teasing, though she doesn't have the guts to intervene. By the time the winner of a drawing contest the class had entered turns out to be Wanda, for her vivid drawings of the 100 dresses, Wanda has moved away and can't accept her award. 

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Grammar Girl : The Rules of Story :: Quick and Dirty Tips ™

Grammar Girl : The Rules of Story :: Quick and Dirty Tips ™ | AdLit | Scoop.it

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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 1:01 PM

The seven things our brains look for in a story--and it isn't all about the writing.

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Paideia Seminar

The Paideia Seminar is a conversation conducted in an orderly manner by a leader who acts as moderator. It is a discussion that focuses on stories, poems, plays or other products of human art; a joint search in which ideas in a text are clarified and in which something new and unexpected is discovered; and a discussion in which both teachers and students sit so that they can face one another as they talk.

The seminar leader, considered "the first among equals in a joint effort to reach a goal that is shared by all," has the responsibility to prepare questions and to facilitate the discussion. In preparing for the seminar, the leader must read the text carefully, underlining key words, marking important sentences and paragraphs, and jotting down main points, observations and questions. Then he/she should write out a few key questions extracted from his or her notes. These should include an "opening" question that initiates discussion on the text and that everyone around the table can answer in succession, perhaps a few "closed" (or "convergent") questions that require students to recall important information from the text, and some "open" (or "divergent") questions for which there are no right answers.

There should be at least one "core" question that focuses on the central meaning or heart of the piece. The seminar leader has three main tasks: 1. to ask a series of questions that define the discussion and give it direction, 2. to examine or query the answers by trying to draw out the reasons for them or the implications they have, and to engage the participants in two-way talk with one another when the views they have advanced appear to be in conflict. It is imperative that the leader be a good listener as well as question-asker, for he/she must often rephrase student comments, making clarifications by writing key points on the blackboard, and make sure that questions and responses are heard or understood. To facilitate a close reading and discussion of the work, the leader should ask students to refer to the text to support their responses, citing the page and paragraph or line from a poem. Asking questions such as "Where can you find that in the text?" will keep participants on track.

GUIDELINES FOR SEMINAR LEADERS

1.       Read the text carefully, underlining key words and defining those words you might not understand, marking important sentences and paragraphs, and jotting down main points.

2.       Prepare questions as follows:

a.       An opening question that everyone around the table can answer in succession. This question should interest you and the members of the group. It can be about something you were made to think about by the reading.

b.       A few closed (or convergent) questions that require recall from the text, and hold participants accountable for the reading.

c.       Several open (or divergent) questions for which there will be no right answers.

d.       At least one core question that focuses on the central message of the piece.

3.       Form a circle and lead the discussion with the following tasks in mind:

a.       State the questions and listen carefully.

b.       Ask students to refer to the text and support their responses.

c.       Ask students to relate their observations to the topic of discussion---keep the group on task.

d.       You are not the expert who has all the right answers, but you are a moderator or guide who helps the whole group come to some answers.

4.       Each group will have a recorder---a different one each time---to be the collective memory of the group and prepare an overhead transparency to present to the entire class. The transparency will be a summary that reports to the rest of the class the most important concepts and ideas of your group.

NOTE: If a member has not read the material, he/she could be excused to do the reading elsewhere. "Failing to prepare will be regarded as preparing to fail."

Top of Page

SEMINAR RULES FOR ALL PARTICIPANTS

1.       Be prepared. This means reading the "text" closely, taking notes, and forming questions. Outline each section and have the outline in front of you.

2.       Be courteous. There will be no put-downs and no sarcasm.

3.       Allow the speaker enough time to begin and finish his/her thoughts. (Do not be afraid of silence---this usually means thinking is occurring.)

4.       Bring others into the discussion and ask others to elaborate on their responses.

COMMUNICATIONS SUGGESTIONS

Active listening: Nods, eye contact, and words like "I see" demonstrate that you are paying attention to the other person's message. Leaning forward and putting aside other tasks to concentrate on the conversation is part of active listening. It says, "I really care about what you have to say. It's important to me." State back to someone what has been communicated to you in order to ensure common understanding--i.e., offer feedback. Restatement shows sensitivity to the other person's message and says that you are really trying to understand.

Means of making people feel listened to, and of ensuring better communication?

1.       Sit down and pay attention to them. Stop doing other things. Show them that they are more important than the other things you are doing.

2.       Look them in the eye. Keep up eye contact. Show them with your face, eyes and gestures that they are important right now and that you are listening.

3.       Give them feedback to show you are paying attention. Nod your head, lean forward, get involved.

4.       Listen before you speak. Don't take over the conversation and tell them what you think or what you would do. Don't be sarcastic, insult them, call them names, or use language that offends them.

5.       Use your feedback skills and summarize their information.

Top of Page

(University of Toledo, http://www.h2000.utoledo.edu/hs/clay/ThePaideia.html, accessed July 16, 2002)

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Search Results- NGA Common Core State Standards

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NGA was an important part of Common Core State Standards initiative.  See the many resources on Common Core State Standards on their site Here.

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All Edmodo Webinars

Introduction to Edmodo This webinar gives an overview of the core features of Edmodo, focusing on student and teacher use, and participating in Edmodo Communities. Sign up for a live webinar Watch ...
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BluePrintReview book+lit blog: A brief survey of the short story - a ...

BluePrintReview book+lit blog: A brief survey of the short story - a ... | AdLit | Scoop.it
In his own words, the portrays form "... a regular series of blogs that propose to offer a (very) partial survey of the short story, each post dealing with a single author who did or is doing something special with the form.

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Different ways of punctuating an interjection - by Jose Juan Gutierrez - Helium

Different ways of punctuating an interjection - by Jose Juan Gutierrez - Helium | AdLit | Scoop.it
An interjection is a word that is used to express emotions, such as happiness, sadness, surprise, pain,  shock, etc.

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Teens Writing for Teens: New Posts Coming On Short Stories

Teens Writing for Teens: New Posts Coming On Short Stories | AdLit | Scoop.it
I don't have the attention span to read novels anymore. Sometimes it feels like by the time I get to the middle of the book, I would have already forgotten the beginning. Reading short stories is instant gratification and has ...

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With Gladness and Glue | Inspiring Short Stories

With Gladness and Glue | Inspiring Short Stories | AdLit | Scoop.it
With Gladness and Glue, inspiring short story reminding us to help others.

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50 Popular iPad Apps For Struggling Readers & Writers

50 Popular iPad Apps For Struggling Readers & Writers | AdLit | Scoop.it
Whether you're the parent of a child with a reading disability or an educator that works with learning disabled students on a daily basis, you're…...

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Steven Blomdale's curator insight, March 6, 2013 7:35 PM

 In schools across Australia there is strong support for linking learning in Technologies with learning literacy skills. Learning in Technologies places a high priority on accurate and unambiguous communication (ACARA, 2013).Implementing digital technologies in learning areas such as English allows special education teachers to facilitate and accommodate the learning needs of students. This is achieved through integrating assistive devices such as the iPad and its applications to develop critical literacy skills needed in the 21st century.  Consequently special education teacher have a better opportunity to develop important General capabilities such as literacy (LIT) to allows student to become literate as they develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions to interpret and use language confidently for learning and communicating in and out of school and for participating effectively in society (ACARA, 2013).

 

 

This website suggests various applications that can be used on the ipad to assist special needs students. The list of  applications were selected to improve and develop students reading, writing and spelling. They engage the students through making the activities, fun and engaging, which I think is important when teaching special needs students.

Patricia Christian's curator insight, March 22, 2014 8:53 PM

You can never have enough resources to pull from when working with mainstream or challenged students. 

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CCCC Position Statement on Teaching, Learning, and Assessing Writing in Digital Environments

The Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) Position Statement on Teaching, Learning, and Assessing Writing in Digital Environments
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Meograph: Four-dimensional storytelling

Meograph: Four-dimensional storytelling | AdLit | Scoop.it
Meograph helps you easily create, share, and playback beautiful stories in context of Where and When.

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A New Way To Teach Using Wordle

A New Way To Teach Using Wordle | AdLit | Scoop.it
There's a new way to teach using wordle. It involves actually withholding a bit of information and making students think a bit harder.

Pictures convey meaning in profound ways. I’ll illustrate this using a free word cloud program called www.wordle.net. Below I have a series of favorite quotes on visualization, with references. Attached I have a word cloud of the quotes (minus the source). Please read the quotes and then look to the word cloud. I ask you: which is more powerful? Which gets the point across quicker, stronger, and faster? Which would your students prefer to read?

 

http://edudemic.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Visualize_no_authors-730x480.png"alt="wordle authors" width="730" height="480"/>

I’ve purposely chosen different types of quotes on visualization to use in the word cloud to illustrate the cloud as it is meant to be used—to immediately and visually highlight commonalities in text. This is a powerful tool for students; I use it at the beginning of my chapter lecture notes to visually represent the material for that chapter.


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Anne Whaits's comment, January 28, 2013 4:17 PM
Thanks for the share! ThingLink is wonderful and have used it myself http://www.vclecturer.co.za/one-app-at-a-time/thinglink.html
Anne Whaits's comment, January 28, 2013 4:21 PM
Susan Oxenevad uses it extensively in her teaching http://thinglinktoolkit.wikispaces.com/Home and http://d97cooltools.blogspot.com/2012/05/thinglink-in-classroom.html
Mario Castillo's curator insight, December 1, 2013 11:08 PM

Wordle- Used during the semester for Formative/Summative assignment Week #3.

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Deeper Learning: Defining Twenty-First Century Literacy | Edutopia

Deeper Learning: Defining Twenty-First Century Literacy | Edutopia | AdLit | Scoop.it
Blogger Rebecca Alber explores the changing definition of literacy in this new century.

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Teaching Text Structure

By Emily Kissner. This presentation guides teachers through the process of teaching text structure. Great for professional development sessions, content area te

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