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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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David Coleman on ELA Common Core Standards

Watch this video presentation here: http://neric.welearntube.org/?q=node/146

Shifts in literacy with CC

1. 50 percent stories and 50 percent informational text. We know in K-5 that is where the foundation of knowledge is developed. Great place to learn about the world and create mental structures for future learning.

2. The building of knowledge rest in science and technical subjects art, history, technology, engineering. The ELA Common Core includes those content area. Those subjects demand that literacy drives learning in those areas. Reading, writing, and thinking. Literacy plays a major role in gaining knowledge in those subjects.

3. Text complexity matters. The difficulty and complexity of the text plays a major role in guiding literacy performance rather than the skills by which you are reading it. First time there is step in complexity of text as student increase in grade level.

4. Focusing on questions that require you to pay attention to the text itself.

5. Writing- Shift to getting student to write persuasive arguments with researched supporting evidence.

6. Academic vocabulary is the true language of power. True for language learners.

Summation: Read like a detective and write like a conscientious investigative reporter


Via Mel Riddile
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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from common core practitioner
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Close Reading of Texts

An overview of what we mean by "close reading" -- as part of the shifts in the Common Core

Via commoncore2014@gmail.com
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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A Reading Comprehension Tool To Simplify Text - TeachThought

A Reading Comprehension Tool To Simplify Text - TeachThought | AdLit | Scoop.it
Need a reading comprehension tool to simplify texts for students? Something practical, along the lines of our “How To Google Search by Reading Level,” and Conversion Chart For Reading Level Measurement Tools?

You may find some use in rewordify.

In short, you copy/paste text to be “simplified,” and it does its thing. It attempts to simplify the text at the vocabulary level (as opposed to syntatical, structural, or idea level). Nonetheless, when vocabulary is the barrier, it does the trick. The replacements don’t always do what they should–simplify the text to make it more readable for struggling readers, or students reading beyond their natural level. Sometimes the definitions are themselves confusing, as they add an additional cognitive movement the student has to make, internalizing this now sterile definition back into some kind of meaning.

Via John Evans
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Michigana Sources in U.S. History Online (Library of Michigan)

Writings about MIchigan History by those who lived it:

 

http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/Michigana;jsessionid=1B8562E63512AA1E16BB22FF6714BF9B?locID=lom_accessmich

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Amazing Science
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Babies' brains adjust to listening to a language, even if they never learn it.

Babies' brains adjust to listening to a language, even if they never learn it. | AdLit | Scoop.it

Our brains start soaking in details from the languages around us from the moment we can hear them. One of the first things infants learn of their native languages is the system of consonants and vowels, as well as other speech sound characteristics, like pitch. In the first year of life, a baby’s ear tunes in to the particular set of sounds being spoken in its environment, and the brain starts developing the ability to tell subtle differences among them—a foundation that will make a difference in meaning down the line, allowing the child to learn words and grammar.

 

But what happens if that child gets shifted into a different culture after laying the foundations of its first native language? Does it forget everything about that first language, or are there some remnants that remain buried in the brain?

 

According to a recent PNAS paper, the effects of very early language learning are permanently etched into the brain, even if input from that language stops and it’s replaced by another language. To identify this lasting influence, the researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans on children who had been adopted to see what neural patterns could be identified years after adoption.

 

Because not all linguistic features have easily identifiable effects on the brain, the researchers decided to focus on lexical tone. This is a feature found in some languages that allows a single arrangement of consonants and vowels to have different meanings that are distinguished by a change in pitch. For example, in Mandarin Chinese, the word “ma” with a rising tone means “hemp”—the same syllable with a falling tone means “scold.”

 

People who speak tone languages have differences in brain activity in a certain region of the brain’s left hemisphere. This region activates in response to pitch differences that are used to convey a difference in linguistic meaning; non-linguistic pitch is processed in the right hemisphere. Tone information is learned very early in life: infants learning Chinese languages (including Mandarin and Cantonese) show signs of recognizing tonal contrasts as early as four months.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Digital Delights for Learners
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Debate Graph

Debate Graph | AdLit | Scoop.it
Debate map visualization of: Learn more about the DebateGraph team and how to contact us.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, November 23, 11:35 PM

DebateGraph is a social enterprise that combines argument visualization with collaborative editing to make the best arguments on all sides of every complex public debate.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Creative teaching and learning
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Fifteen great audiobooks for helping kids read better ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Fifteen great audiobooks for helping kids read better ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | AdLit | Scoop.it

"The puzzling question that is often posed when talking about audiobooks' integration in the teaching and learning of literacy is whether they have the same cognitive benefits as the actual reading. In other words , can listening to audiobooks be considered reading? ..."

©

 

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Leona Ungerer
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Xuan Phan's curator insight, November 25, 11:36 PM

Audiobooks is an amazing  learning tool for people of all ages, who enjoys reading or would like to improve their reading skills.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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10 Novels Every Middle Schooler Should Read - We Are Teachers

10 Novels Every Middle Schooler Should Read - We Are Teachers | AdLit | Scoop.it
In search of the spell that will compel kids to turn pages, raise hands, journal and jump in, we asked teachers and experts in our social network community to share the novels they bring to their fourth- through eighth-grade students time and time again. We asked them which middle school novels not only inspire that magic-wand effect, but also teach cross-curricular content.

Via John Evans
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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The Most Important Lesson Schools Can Teach Kids About Reading: It's Fun

The Most Important Lesson Schools Can Teach Kids About Reading: It's Fun | AdLit | Scoop.it
Yes, strong literacy skills help students get good grades and, eventually, good jobs. But schools shouldn't forget to emphasize the joy of getting lost in a book.

Via Heather Stapleton
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, November 16, 2013 6:49 AM

and this is where your school librarian fits in...

BJ Neary's curator insight, November 17, 2013 3:18 PM

A great article, let kids read what they want and it will benefit them throughout their lives.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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How to teach… reading for pleasure

How to teach… reading for pleasure | AdLit | Scoop.it

"The link between reading for fun and educational success is well established, but how can teachers get reluctant readers into books?"


Via Heather Stapleton
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Heather Stapleton's curator insight, December 17, 2013 10:41 PM

Links to resources from the Teacher Network, The Guardian.

Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, December 18, 2013 2:05 AM

This is full of useful ideas and resources. 

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, December 18, 2013 10:16 PM

An excellent resource for teachers as it focuses on reluctant readers and those from illiterate or non reading homes.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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Tristan Bancks | Australian Children's & Teen Author | Kids' & YA Books: Top ten books

Tristan Bancks | Australian Children's & Teen Author | Kids' & YA Books: Top ten books | AdLit | Scoop.it

Australian authors of Children's and Young Adult fiction share their favourite teen / YA books.


Via Heather Stapleton
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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Reluctant readers get in the game with books about sport - Sydney Morning Herald

Reluctant readers get in the game with books about sport - Sydney Morning Herald | AdLit | Scoop.it
Tales of glory and dashed dreams on the sportsfield may be the key to get children wary of books to take up reading, writes Karen Hardy.

Via Heather Stapleton
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Heather Stapleton's curator insight, October 18, 4:35 AM

Includes excellent tips from author Deborah Abela on how to get your kids reading.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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Top 10 Ways to Get a Middle School Student to Want to Read by Meredith Daniels

Top 10 Ways to Get a Middle School Student to Want to Read by Meredith Daniels | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Middle school students are known for being picky.  Along with being picky, this age group very rarely wants to read 'assigned books'. Here are the Top 10 ways to get your middle school students to read"


Via Heather Stapleton
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Shanahan on Literacy: Unbalanced Comments on Balanced Literacy

Shanahan on Literacy: Unbalanced Comments on Balanced Literacy | AdLit | Scoop.it

 

Friday, October 31, 2014Unbalanced Comments on Balanced Literacy  Want to win an argument about literacy? Just claim your approach is “balanced.” Balanced is a affirmative term… That’s why Fox-News claims to be “fair and balanced.” It not only makes your position sound reasonable, but implies your opponents may be a bit off, you know, imbalanced. So it is not too surprising that school principals and district literacy leaders often tout their reading programs as balanced.“Balanced literacy” sounds great, but what does it mean? What is being balanced? A few weeks ago, I responded here to some arguments about reading instruction that had appeared on the Washington Post website. One of the participants in that argument, a school principal I believe, was arguing that balanced literacy referred to the balancing of text difficulty. I’ve heard balanced literacy promoted as a balance of textbooks and tradebooks, reading and writing, phonics and comprehension, motivation and teaching, and several other pairings, but challenging and easy text was a new one on me. That’s one of the cool things about balance… you can tailor what is being balanced to your audience. If you’re meeting with the NAACP, you can tell them that you have a “balanced literacy” program, and when they ask what that is, you can look down your nose and answer (as if everybody knows), “it means that we balance the literature selections by White and Black authors.” They’ll love it. The same ploy will probably work at the NOW convention. And, Common Core? It asks for 50-50 coverage of literature and informational text. So CCSS is a set of  “balanced literacy standards.” Oh me, oh my. The term “balanced literacy” was coined by the late Michael Pressley. He even published a book on it, during the “reading wars.” Michael was a proponent of phonics (he was an author of the Open Court reading series at the time), but he wanted to heal the great divide between people like him and Whole Language advocates. His felt that we needed to balance the demands of the two groups. He supported the explicit teaching of decoding, but believed the Whole Language folks were right when it came to motivation. He took it that Whole Language was all about or mainly about getting kids interested in reading. He didn’t see balanced literacy as simply a political compromise between two warring camps, but as an acknowledgement about what each group had right. He himself had conducted observational studies in high success classrooms and was amazed at how motivational the teachers were (Michael, a psychologist who had never taught children or spent much time in classrooms before this so his amazement is understandable). Of course, Whole Language advocates didn’t love this compromise at the time—let’s face it, they saw their position as being more than the dessert after the vegetables. And, many of my explicit teaching colleagues still see it as a way of avoiding sufficient amounts of explicit teaching. I‘m probably more in the camp of the basic skills folks than the whole language ones, but not rabidly so. One school I know adopted my literacy framework (2 hours of literacy instruction each day divided equally among word knowledge, fluency, reading comprehension, and writing), but then added an extra 30 minutes dedicated to motivating kids to be lifelong readers. This included time for teacher reading to kids, student self-selection, book clubs, and other activities and discussions aimed at promoting literacy. I had no problem with that, but I don’t see it as balanced. The two hours of explicit instruction and guided practice is supported by research and has been found to benefit kids. The motivational efforts, whether good or bad, are on thin ice when it comes to evidence that they work. I accepted as a reasonable because it didn’t interfere with a heavy dose of effective teaching. Unfortunately, “balance” too often means that kids don’t get substantial explicit instruction in phonological awareness, phonics, vocabulary, spelling, handwriting, oral reading fluency, reading comprehension, or writing. Studies show repeatedly that explicit instruction in these is beneficial in moving kids forward in literacy learning and the idea of balancing these essentials against something else is bothersome. 
It is time that we retire the balanced literacy.

 

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from common core practitioner
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Teaching

Teaching | AdLit | Scoop.it
Brenda Kovich discusses Common Core State Standards for Language 4.2 (L.4.2), including teaching kids to quote in her blog.

Via commoncore2014@gmail.com
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Mika Auramo's comment, August 8, 12:47 AM
näkyy jo meilläkin: kaksoispisteet hukassa
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Linking Literacy, Research, and Practice
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Nonfiction conversations: Talking nonfiction picture book biographies with kids

Nonfiction conversations: Talking nonfiction picture book biographies with kids | AdLit | Scoop.it

When I read aloud nonfiction titles to my class, it takes a long time. Often, we stretch a read aloud over weeks. Lots of reading aloud is happening in our room - a novel, various picture books, se...


Via Bookmarking Librarian, Dean J. Fusto
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ASCD Webinars - Terry Roberts, THE PAIDEIA SEMINAR--Speaking and Listening Across the CCSS

ASCD Webinars - Terry Roberts, THE PAIDEIA SEMINAR--Speaking and Listening Across the CCSS | AdLit | Scoop.it

Speaking and Listening Across the Common CoreRecorded July 10, 2013

Many educators forget that embedded at the heart of the Common Core State Standards are anchor standards for speaking and listening. 

Director of the National Paideia Center Terry Roberts introduces the Paideia Seminar and discusses how it provides teachers with a consistent and powerful way to teach these speaking and listening standards—while simultaneously enhancing students' ability to successfully read and write about demanding texts

ResourcesWebinar presentation handout (PDF) See the Archived Webinar here:

http://bcove.me/3ewph0xy

 

           

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Scriveners' Trappings
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The Best Children’s Books of 2014

The Best Children’s Books of 2014 | AdLit | Scoop.it

by Marie Popova

 

"This is certainly the case with the most intelligent and imaginative “children’s” and picture-books published this year. (Because the best children’s books provide, as Tolkien believed, perennial delight, step into the time machine and revisit previous selections for 2013, 2012, 2011, and 2010.)"

 

Jim Lerman's insight: Popova's post is lavishly illustrated with images from the 15 books she selected for this year's list. Fans may wish to visit her list of winners for the previous 4 years as well.


Via Jim Lerman
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Classroom Technology Integration and Project Based Learning
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Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 6 Good iPad Apps to Turn Pictures Into Cartoons and Comics

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 6 Good iPad Apps to Turn Pictures Into Cartoons and Comics | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Inge Wassmann
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Moodle and Web 2.0
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Free Technology for Teachers: Nine Popular Student Response Tools Compared In One Chart

Last winter I published a chart that compared the key features of five popular student response platforms. In the nine months since then more student response tools have come onto market. This morning I added those tools my chart. The chart is embedded below as PDF hosted by Box.com. You can also get a Google Documents copy of it by clicking here.


Via Amy Burns, Juergen Wagner
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Amy Burns's curator insight, November 23, 2:04 PM

Handy chart for comparing available tools.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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How to Get Boys Reading Perhaps

How to Get Boys Reading Perhaps | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Today I was asked how I get my boys reading, and while I am not an expert, and some of them still don’t read as much I would love them to, I do have a few ideas.  (And yes, many of these apply to the girls as well)."


Via Heather Stapleton
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Heather Stapleton's curator insight, November 16, 2013 12:41 AM

Excellent tips from Pernille Ripp on encouraging boys (and girls) to read.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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Enjoy A Book: Remedies for Reluctant Readers

Enjoy A Book: Remedies for Reluctant Readers | AdLit | Scoop.it

"A book review blog with a literacy lean. Contemporary young adult, middle-grade, nonfiction, literary fiction--there's something here for everyone!"


Via Heather Stapleton
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Heather Stapleton's curator insight, January 16, 9:21 PM

Great posts on promoting reading, literacy, book reviews, readers advisory and more!

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, January 18, 12:41 AM

I love reading yet I have grandchildren who don't enjoy it. And I know there are children and adults everywhere like that. So this blog might be of help. Also those wishing to improve their English and looking for books that will reward their effort.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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Girl books vs Boy books

Girl books vs Boy books | AdLit | Scoop.it
Authors Kirsty Murray and Myke Bartlett discuss the role gender plays in what young people choose to read.

Via Heather Stapleton
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How do we get more boys reading? (Clue: 'boy books' aren't the answer.)

How do we get more boys reading? (Clue: 'boy books' aren't the answer.) | AdLit | Scoop.it

"The Let Books Be Books campaign has attracted much media coverage and high profile support, but labelling books ‘for boys’ is sometimes defended as a useful tool for getting boys to read. Tricia Lowther argues that gendering reading doesn’t help literacy, and may even be harming boys’ chances."


Via Heather Stapleton
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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The Need for Big Books: A Top "Ten" List by Stephanie Severson

The Need for Big Books: A Top "Ten" List by Stephanie Severson | AdLit | Scoop.it

"I read a lot about reluctant readers and how to get boys to read.  This is definitely an issue I see in my classroom.  However, I have also encountered the opposite problem -- the boys that burn through books...

This is my go-to list of long books for voracious readers who happen to be boys…"


Via Heather Stapleton
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
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5 Tips for Helping a Student Find the Right Book

5 Tips for Helping a Student Find the Right Book | AdLit | Scoop.it
Research shows that children want assistance with finding a reading book. While your students search the stacks, here's some helpful tips for teachers.

Via Heather Stapleton
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