AdLit
Follow
Find
5.9K views | +0 today
 

From around the web

AdLit
Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Echoes and Reflections: Leaders in Holocaust Education

Echoes and Reflections: Leaders in Holocaust Education | AdLit | Scoop.it

Bring a Survivor into Your Classroom Today 

Tomorrow is Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Day. Using primary sources and video testimony from survivors, Echoes and Reflections teaches about the Holocaust in a way that stimulates engagement and critical thinking among students.

 

Share testimony with your students.

Lynnette Van Dyke's insight:

 Critical thinking about the Holocaust:Download lesson resources, testimony and I-Witness accounts, visual history clips by lesson

The ten multipart lessons in the Teacher's Resource Guide, along with additional supplementary material provided here, can enhance both teachers' and students' experiences with Echoes and Reflections. Explore each lesson below for access to all of the materials you need to implement the lesson and to extend the topic being explored.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Meta-Collaboration: Thinking With Another

Meta-Collaboration: Thinking With Another | AdLit | Scoop.it
Humans are social animals because our survival depends on it. Here are four strategies for teaching students how their brains work through acts of collaboration.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Common Core in Action: Narrative Writing

Common Core in Action: Narrative Writing | AdLit | Scoop.it
Blogger Heather Wolpert-Gawron provides strategies and steps for teaching narrative writing aligned to the Common Core State Standards.

 

Once I decided that the students would move away from fantasy or personal narrative into a more fact-based fiction, the challenge was to find ways students could prove their informational research. I began teaching guiding them through the following:

Producing bibliographies of their resources using APA or MLA format. They use these as a resource to help them with format. And yes, I permit the use of Easybib.Creating follow-up presentations called "What if...." projects. Inspired by a resource from Larry Ferlazzo, these five- to 10-slide Powerpoints or Prezis ask students to take a key moment in the time period in which their historical fiction piece is set or a key invention they studied while writing their science fiction story, and delete it from our own history. Their projects focus on the ripple effect of what if that moment or invention had never existed. They must back up their musings with evidence.Centering small group discussions around inquiry charts that expand on the differences between history vs. historical fiction and science vs. science fiction.Hyperlinking.

 

Read more....

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Literature & Psychology
Scoop.it!

18 Literary Maps of the United States

18 Literary Maps of the United States | AdLit | Scoop.it
RT @mental_floss: 18 Literary Maps of the United States — http://t.co/rTyXd8Zcg9

 

The first United States transcontinental road trip was completed in 1903, and Americans have been enamored with the open road ever since. The only thing more American than a road trip? A literary route celebrating American authors. The Library of Congress’ Language of the Land exhibit collects bookish state maps that chart the regions and the writers who loved them, either through birth or discovery.


Via Mary Daniels Brown
more...
Mary Daniels Brown's curator insight, April 15, 5:18 PM

Unfortunately, the images here, even the supposedly enlarged ones, are unreadable. And there's no information on how to see the originals or purchase individual state maps. Pretty poor execution, Mental Floss.

Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

NCTE Assessment Story Project: What We're Learning - YouTube

Join educators Peggy O'Neill (Loyola University, MD) and Scott Filkins (Champaign Schools, IL) as they discuss what we've learned so far from the Assessment ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Free Online Article Rewriter Software - YouTube

Rewrite Content With Just One Click. In this video I show you how to use my free artile rewriting software at http://www.freearticlespinner.com to create uni...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Paraphrasing: The Basic Steps - YouTube

It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Literature Review (Part Three): Outline and Write the Review of Literature - YouTube

How to outline and write the academic review of literature for students at the University of Maryland University College.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Writing the Literature Review (Part One): Step-by-Step Tutorial for Graduate Students - YouTube

Take the mystery out of this academic assignment with these simple formulas.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

How to Write a Great Research Paper - YouTube

An eye-opening talk... Professor Simon Peyton Jones, Microsoft Research, gives a guest lecture on writing. Seven simple suggestions: don't wait - write, iden...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Holocaust Concentration Camps Pictures - The Holocaust - HISTORY.com

Holocaust Concentration Camps Pictures - The Holocaust - HISTORY.com | AdLit | Scoop.it
Emaciated survivors of one of the largest Nazi concentration camps, at Ebensee, Austria, entered by the 80th division, U.S. Third army on May 7, 1945.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Reading Comprehension Strategies | School Improvement Network

Reading Comprehension Strategies | School Improvement Network | AdLit | Scoop.it
Teaching reading comprehension to your students is not a one-size-fits-all prospect. Here are three strategies you can walk through with your students and use to accelerate their comprehension.

 

Here are three strategies you can walk through with your students and use to accelerate their comprehension.

 

Monitoring comprehension
Students can learn to know when they understand what they read and when they do not. They can have strategies to improve their understanding. Instruction, even in the early grades, can help students become better at monitoring their comprehension.

Comprehension monitoring strategies include:

Identify where the difficulty occurs

Identify what the difficulty is

Restate the difficult sentence or passage in their own words

Look back through the text

Look forward in the text for information that might help them to resolve the difficulty

Graphic organizers


Graphic organizers can help students focus on text structure (such as differences between fiction and nonfiction) as they read. They provide tools to help examine and show relationships. They can also help with writing well-organized summaries.

 

You can get more information on these strategies and others at readingrockets.org, a national literacy initiative for helping young kids learn to read.

 

Strategies for Before, During, and After Reading PreK–3rd Grade

 

Students can increase their reading comprehension through a variety of activities. This video segment  showcases classrooms in which real teachers implement various comprehension strategies (such as KWL charts, structured notes, graphic organizers, T-charts, and evidence-based summaries) before, during, and after reading.

 

This video segment also comes with a downloadable study guide that summarizes the concepts presented and offers reflection questions as well as links to additional resources for teaching reading comprehension.

These materials are part of a comprehensive series of videos and downloadable resources on teaching literacy

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

From Preschool to Adulthood: Building Social and Emotional Skills with Fiction

From Preschool to Adulthood: Building Social and Emotional Skills with Fiction | AdLit | Scoop.it
Blogger Maurice Elias explains how reading fiction helps build empathy and interpersonal skills.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Interactive Fiction in the Classroom

Interactive Fiction in the Classroom | AdLit | Scoop.it
As a classroom tool, interactive fiction sharpens close reading and writing, and logical and critical thinking. It also reinforces systems and design thinking skills.

 

Essentially text-based, interactive fiction is a genre of games with roots that predate the internet. The player/reader makes choices that determine the outcome of the narrative. It's like a digital version of Dungeons & Dragons, the paper-based role-playing game set in a medieval fantasy world. It's also similar to choice-based fiction, like the Choose Your Own Adventure book series that began in the late 1970s.

Because player choice changes the narrative arc, interactive fiction can be used to teach empathy, what it's like to be in someone else's shoes. For example, Begscape (built with Twine, which I'll discuss later), puts the reader in the role of a beggar. Another intriguing text-based game is A Dark Room, an addictive resource management game. In 2015, a text adventure adaptation of the film Interstellar was released at the same time as the DVD.

A Brief History of Text-Based Gaming

Computer-based interactive fiction began in 1975 with Infocom's Adventure. Next came the Zork and Ultima series. In the mid-1980s, Douglas Adams adapted his bestselling book The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy as an interactive title. It's still playable online today.

The 1990s introduced the world to text-based MUDs (multi-user dungeons) like Ultima Online. The web enabled multiple players to join together in online virtual worlds. Present day massive multiplayer online (MMO) games like World of Warcraft stem from MUDs.

In 1996, designer Richard Bartle published an influential paper titled Hearts, Clubs, Diamonds, Spades: Players Who Suit MUDs. According to Bartle, there are personality types (Bartle's Player Types), each of which must be considered by a game's designer. In other words, people play games for different reasons -- some to socialize, others to collect objects, and others who compete to win. When designing virtual worlds, all player types should be considered. Similarly, when teachers design lessons, multiple modalities should be addressed.

Interactive Fiction Today

The descendents of text-based adventure games include games with threaded conversation trees. The story decisions are often presented as multiple-choice responses, which are coded as conditional loops, or "if-then statements." (Incidentally, interactive fiction is often abbreviated as IF.) The Mission U.S. educational role-playing games rely on the choice-based mechanic.

One of the leaders in choice-based gaming today is Telltale Games. It adapted The Walking Dead (2013), The Wolf Among Us (2013) -- based on the Fables comics -- and Game of Thrones (2014). Each title features animations followed by dialogue choices. The direction of the story arc hinges on player decisions. Telltale Games is currently developing Minecraft: Storymode for Mojang (developer of Minecraft, the popular block-building game).

Interactive Fiction as a Teaching Tool

There are several free authoring tools to write interactive fiction. Some have an easier learning curve than others. One example is Inform, a "natural" programming language. Inform games are typically single-player -- the player types after a command prompt. For example, one might read, "The door ahead of you is open." To advance the story, the player might decide to type, "Open door."

In 2014, GlassLab's lead designer Erin Hoffman and I used Inform to create Time Society Chronicles: Independence. The objective was to give students the feeling of living in British-occupied Boston during the American Revolution -- interactive historical fiction. After playing, I asked students how it inspired them to create their own interactive stories. Here, my role was not just to have students play a game, but to contextualize their learning.

Twine is an increasingly popular application for creating stories with multiple endings. It's available as a free download and features a vibrant community, as well as a story database showcasing best practices. Completed stories can be posted anywhere online. Twine is effective as a tool that teaches reading and writing. For more on games made with Twine, check out this recent New York Times Magazine article.

The authoring tool inklewriter works right in a computer's browser and features a simple-to-follow tutorial for new learners. Aspiring writers can share links to stories or export to a Kindle device. Inklewriter won 2013's Best Website for Teaching and Learning award from the American Association of School Librarians. The developer, inkle, had previously published 80 Days, a tablet game based on the classic Jules Verne novel. It was considered the top video game of 2014 from Time magazine. Inkle next adapted Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as interactive fiction. Future Voices is its online anthology of shared stories, used to celebrate exemplary works.

Using interactive fiction in the classroom sharpens close reading and writing, logical thinking, and other critical thinking competencies. It also reinforces systems thinking and design thinking skills -- in which interconnections are mapped and user experiences are considered. The low barrier to entry makes interactive fiction a natural fit for any student-centered classroom

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
Scoop.it!

3 #Google #Chrome Apps for Leveled Reading (and much more!)

3 #Google #Chrome Apps for Leveled Reading (and much more!) | AdLit | Scoop.it
Chrome Apps for Leveled Reading
If you have followed this blog for very long, then you know that I am a self-professed Chrome Addict. I love it! I love the fact that I can customize it to fit my needs, but I love it even more because we can customize it t

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Three Ways to Frame Your Thinking About the Common Core State Standards - YouTube

NCTE author Sarah Brown Wessling offers inspiring ways to think about the CCSS and reminds us that the CCSS are more than a checklist of tasks, but a map for...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Technology Advances
Scoop.it!

Principles and Practices in Electronic Portfolios

 

Introductory Premises

Composition professionals in post-secondary institutions—composition faculty, writing program administrators, and technology staff—share concern and responsibility for helping students learn to write at a college level, using the most effective communication technologies. Disciplinary practice and research suggest that portfolio assessment has become an important part of the learning-to-write process.

In turn, electronic portfolios (e-portfolios) have become a viable institutional tool to facilitate student learning and its assessment. E-portfolios can be “web-sensible”—a thoughtfully arranged collection of multimedia-rich, interlinked, hypertextual documents that students compose, own, maintain, and archive on the Internet or in other formats. Web applications designed to support e-portfolio composition can offer additional opportunities for providing structure, guidance, and feedback to students, and can provide students with opportunities to connect selectively with multiple audiences.

E-portfolios communicate various kinds of information for the purposes of assessment. For example, e-portfolios can:

Identify connections among academic and extra-curricular learning for admission to higher education and vocational opportunitiesDemonstrate applications of knowledge and critical literacies for course or programmatic assessmentProvide evidence of meeting standards for professional certificationDisplay qualifications for employmentShowcase job-related accomplishments beyond schooling, for evaluation or promotionRepresent lifelong learning for participation in public service

However, these purposes do not capture important kinds of student learning in composition courses that should carry over to writing tasks in other courses and contexts, such as students understanding different writing processes or learning styles or students setting their own goals for future learning.

As e-portfolios assume a greater role in institutional assessment, First-Year Composition (FYC) will most likely serve as the course that introduces them to students. Therefore, FYC faculty may have a particular, vested interest in identifying the principles and practices of e-portfolio development that prioritize student learning. Such principles and best practices, based on the theoretical knowledge that classroom evidence substantiates, enable composition faculty to provide students with experiences that help them expand and specialize their writing skills for a variety of cross-disciplinary programs and professional contexts beyond FYC.

Suggested Principles and Best PracticesPrinciple

#1: Learning OutcomesPrinciple

#2: Digital EnvironmentsPrinciple

#3: Virtual IdentitiesPrinciple

#4: Authentic AudiencesPrinciple

#5: Reflection and E-portfolio PedagogyPrinciple

#6: Integration and Curriculum ConnectionsPrinciple

#7: Stakeholders’ ResponsibilitiesPrinciple

# 8: Lifelong Learning

 

Read more....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

How to Paraphrase Using Google Scholar.mov - YouTube

This video provides strategies for using Google Scholar Cited By to paraphrase a source in an essay or research paper.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Avoid Plagiarism in Research Papers with Paraphrases & Quotations - YouTube

Introduction to guest lecture on plagiarism, paraphrases, direct quotations and source citations for students at the UMUC (University of Maryland University ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Writing the Literature Review (Part Two): Step-by-Step Tutorial for Graduate Students - YouTube

Take the mystery out of this academic assignment with these simple formulas for writing your literature review.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Get Lit: The Literature Review - YouTube

Our most popular video, featuring UWC's Associate Director Candace Schaefer, has just gone over 100,000 views. Here are just a few comments it's received fro...
more...
No comment yet.