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ReadWorks.org | K & 1 Reading Passages on America

ReadWorks.org | K & 1 Reading Passages on America | AdLit | Scoop.it
You’ll love this research-based reading comprehension curriculum. Check out ReadWorks.org!
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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Nurturing Social And Emotional Development In Gifted Teenagers Through Young Adult Literature « SENG

Nurturing Social And Emotional Development In Gifted Teenagers Through Young Adult Literature « SENG | AdLit | Scoop.it
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Notable Notes: Workshop - Metawriting

Notable Notes: Workshop - Metawriting | AdLit | Scoop.it
What are your favorite workshop tips and resources?

Via Deanna Mascle
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Kids’ Books about Inventors and Makers

Kids’ Books about Inventors and Makers | AdLit | Scoop.it
             On this site, you'll find LOTS of book recommendations. In each weekly blog post, I cover one particular STEM topic and all the activities we did to teach it, including books specific to that theme. So, be sure to check those out. On this page, I've collected some of…
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Scriveners' Trappings
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Advice on Writing From The Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates

Advice on Writing From The Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates | AdLit | Scoop.it
Before he wrote cover stories for The Atlantic, before he won a National Magazine Award, before he taught at MIT, Ta-Nehisi Coates was laid off by Time magazine. “To put it bluntly,” he wrote last spring, “I was — like most freelancers — hurting. My wife had been unerringly supportive. My son was getting older. I was considering driving a cab.”

Of course, it’s now six years later, and Coates has had great success writing for The Atlantic, The New York Times, and other publications. But writing doesn’t get easier, he maintains — it’s always a process.

“It’s as though you have a certain music in your head, and trying to get that music out on the page is absolute hell,” he said in an interview for Atlantic Video’s Creative Breakthroughs series. “But what you have to do is give yourself a day, go back, revise, over and over and over again.”

Via Jim Lerman
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Hanif Kureishi: even the best writers face rejection

Hanif Kureishi: even the best writers face rejection | AdLit | Scoop.it
As the British Library launches a collection including rejection letters sent to literary greats, Hanif Kureishi explores how self-doubt can be the greatest obstacle to writing

Via Sharon Bakar
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Learning & Mind & Brain
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Boys who live with books ‘earn more as adults’

Boys who live with books ‘earn more as adults’ | AdLit | Scoop.it
“A room without books is like a body without a soul,” observed the Roman philosopher, Cicero. It can also be a sign of financial hardship to come.

New research has uncovered a strong correlation between the earnings of adults and whether they grew up surrounded by books as children.

Three economists at the University of Padua – Giorgio Brunello, Guglielmo Weber and Christoph Weiss – studied 6,000 men born in nine European countries and concluded that children with access to books could expect to earn materially more than those who grow up with few or no books.

They studied the period from 1920 to 1956, when school reforms saw the minimum school leaving age raised across Europe. They looked at whether, at the age of 10, a child lived in a house with fewer than 10 books, a shelf of books, a bookcase with up to 100 books, two bookcases, or more than two bookcases.
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Over the period studied, the research, published in the Economic Journal, found that an additional year of education increased a man’s average lifetime earnings by 9%. But the returns varied markedly according to socio-economic background.

Men brought up in households with less than a shelf of books earned only 5% more as a result of the extra year’s education, compared with 21% more for those who had access to a lot of books. And those that had access to books were more likely to move to the better-earning opportunities in cities than those without books.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Scriveners' Trappings
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Three Useful Resources If You Want To Write A Book

Three Useful Resources If You Want To Write A Book | AdLit | Scoop.it
I'm adding these three resources to So, You Want To Write A Book? Here's The Best Advice…: To self-publish or not to self-publish? That is the question is by Nik Peachey. A textbook problem: Seven suggestions to improve the quality of published resources is by Jose Picardo. This presentation is from the great Roxanna Elden:…

Via Jim Lerman
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Jim Lerman's curator insight, May 26, 7:10 PM

These are 3 great sources of advice

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Why Are Short Texts So Powerful? - Heinemann

Why Are Short Texts So Powerful? - Heinemann | AdLit | Scoop.it
Reading competes with so many things for kids' attention these days, says Nancy Steineke in the video below. With coauthor Harvey "Smokey" Daniels, she talks through why their new Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Writing emphasizes short, high-interest pieces of writing to keep students engaged.   In the new T&L, there are 50 "one-page wonders." These are high-interest articles from …
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Bridging the Gap Between Writer and Reader: The Benefits of Considering Audience

Bridging the Gap Between Writer and Reader: The Benefits of Considering Audience | AdLit | Scoop.it
by Katie Arosteguy If you’re anything like me, you struggle to get your students (or children) to write. You may also struggle to create meaningful and challenging prompts that they will enjoy writing to. For several years as a high school English teacher and then as a community college and university writing instructor, I had…
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Connected Learning
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Lists for Writers - ideas for creative writing on the App Store

Read reviews, compare customer ratings, see screenshots, and learn more about Lists for Writers - ideas for creative writing. Download Lists for Writers - ideas for creative writing and enjoy it on your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Stephanie Sandifer
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Are You A Good Listener?

Are You A Good Listener? | AdLit | Scoop.it
We hear a lot about how to speak well in public, but very little about how to learn the equally important art of listening properly to others. This video describes four steps to becoming a goo

Via Ariana Amorim, Frances
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donhornsby's curator insight, May 23, 9:08 AM
There are many books on how to be a good speaker. But there are few lessons in how to become a good listener. This is a helpful look at this important subject.
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Why Some People Get 'Skin-Gasms' While Listening To Music

Why Some People Get 'Skin-Gasms' While Listening To Music | AdLit | Scoop.it
You know that feeling when you're listening to a song and you suddenly feel a chill run up your spine or down your arms?
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from All Things Bookish: All about books, all the time
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10 Gorgeous Outdoor Reading Nooks

10 Gorgeous Outdoor Reading Nooks | AdLit | Scoop.it
Beautiful outdoor spaces perfect for reading.

Via Sara Rosett
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Sara Rosett's curator insight, May 23, 9:31 PM
Unfortunately, I won't be reading outdoors this summer--too humid where I live, but I love looking at these bookish outdoor #reading nooks. :) #tw
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Response Abilities: Performing Arts-based Research with Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Martin Luther King | Joe Norris Playbuilding

Response Abilities: Performing Arts-based Research with Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Martin Luther King | Joe Norris Playbuilding | AdLit | Scoop.it
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Having Students Analyze Our Classroom Library To See How Diverse it is

Having Students Analyze Our Classroom Library To See How Diverse it is | AdLit | Scoop.it
In my last post, I described the work that my students and I have been doing as we attempt to better understand where our biases and stereotypes come from in regards to different races, genders and family structures. We began with gender.  And after our work with gender, we were ready to try tackling ideas of…
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Why to NEVER Give an Elevator Speech & What to Say Instead

Why to NEVER Give an Elevator Speech & What to Say Instead | AdLit | Scoop.it
“It’s not about you. It never was.” – actress Diane Keaton Do you know anyone who likes listening to a speech? Me neither. Speeches are lectures. Who wants to be lectured? That’s why, from now on,
Via Bobby Dillard
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New in-ear device could be the beginning of a world without language barriers

New in-ear device could be the beginning of a world without language barriers | AdLit | Scoop.it

From Gene Roddenberry in Star Trek to Douglas Adams in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, anyone who spends much time forecasting the future comes to realize that language has simply got to go. In a connected world, it’s one of the only things remaining that truly separates us — it’s what keeps keeps us from being able to directly consume and understand one another’s film and literature, and what keeps occupying soldiers from being able to effectively make alliances with local peoples. It’s a primitive relic of a bygone age — if we can convert MP4 to AVI, certainly we ought to be able to convert Mandarin to German. Now, a new device called Pilot could make that dream (mostly) a reality.

 

A real-world Babelfish, or Universal Translator if you prefer, has been slow to materialize. We’ve got speech recognition, and we’ve got translation, and we’ve even got both of those things in real-time in some very specific cases, but a portable, near-real-time translation device that moves with you? Despite rumors of GoogleX super-projects, it hasn’t happened yet.

 

One big reason is that real-time translation is hard. It’s so hard, in fact, that all the advancement in computing power we’ve seen in the past 20 years did little to get us closer to the goal. It took a revolution in how we compute information, the influx of neural network models and machine learning algorithms, before we could crunch natural language and produce a translation in a reasonable amount of time — but there’s still a problem. Neural networks are themselves very hard to run, meaning we need a super-computer to do translation.

 

In the context of a wearable, that means you’ll probably need an always-on data connection, which itself means you’ll need a subscription and a hefty power supply to keep the connection going all day. Pilot gets around this by wirelessly accessing your cell phone’s processor to do the work locally; prior on-phone translation services have been imperfect, but Pilot claims to have reached true real-time speeds.

 

What this does to your cellphone’s battery is anybody’s guess, but I’d bet this sort of intensive crunching would burn through even giant Galaxy S-series batteries in a short time. It’s not exactly living “untethered” if you have to plug your phone in every 45 minutes, but sci-fi beggars can’t be choosers, and the early adopters who buy one of these for a cool $300 will still be able to feel like they’re legitimately at the forefront of a tech revolution.

 

The other problem that has held back universal translators is that making one is a complex challenge many practical concerns. Do you turn it on only when you need it, and if so aren’t you going to miss a lot of the unexpected banter that you’d want to hear? How does it know who you’re talking to, in a crowded room full of people speaking? How does it fit on my damn head?

 

Pilot gets around these problems by splitting the service into two pieces. It’s not actually an earpiece, but two earpieces. When you’ve decided you want to talk to somebody (like the dreamy French girl who allegedly inspired this thing), you simply hand them their ear-piece to begin talking. Each of you now has a translator, so you can both understand one another — this takes the place of any sort of speaker that most sci-fi translators use to say our words out loud.

 

So, it’s not quite a “put it in your ear and it’s like everyone’s speaking English” super-invention, and since this came out of an Indiegogo campaign, you wouldn’t really expect it to. But it is incredibly ambitious, and it could spark existing translation efforts from Skype (Microsoft) and Google to shoot a little higher, a little faster.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Aristotle's tomb discoveted by archeologists 

Aristotle's tomb discoveted by archeologists  | AdLit | Scoop.it
Archaeologists are certain that they have found the philosopher's tomb in his birthplace
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A Writer Belongs Everywhere: Stories from a Writing Workshop for Middle School Girls

A Writer Belongs Everywhere: Stories from a Writing Workshop for Middle School Girls | AdLit | Scoop.it
  By Tracey Flores “A woman who writes has power, and a woman with power is feared.” ~Gloria Anzaldúa On an overcast and windy day in May, ten young girls and women--daughters, sisters, mothers and teachers--gathered in Mrs. Gonzalez’s 7th grade classroom for an afternoon of sharing, writing and storytelling. Nibbling on pepperoni pizza and…
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The Library of Congress Is Uploading 75 Years of Poetry and Literature Recordings

The Library of Congress Is Uploading 75 Years of Poetry and Literature Recordings | AdLit | Scoop.it
Yesterday selections from the Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature at the Library of Congress became available to stream online for the first time — the launch of a project digitizing some of their 2,000 recordings from the past 75 years of literature. “I think that reading

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, May 24, 5:31 PM
24 May 2016

EUREKA!

Perhaps my favorite quote from this article says it all, 
__________

“I think that reading poetry and prose on the page is important, but there’s nothing that can replace listening to literature read aloud, especially when it is read by the creator of the work,”
 ~ Catalina Gomez, project manager
__________

I've always sat on the fence about what constitutes an "original source" when speaking of plays, lyrics, and even poetry.

With plays and songs we often are at the mercy of having to experience the text rather than the performance.  In these instances, I think it is easy to justify considering text as a secondary source. Text is not the intended experience of the original piece. It's almost like suggesting that the musical score rather than the music itself is the original source even though the performance rather than the notes that constitute the instruction for delivering the performance is the intended means of communicating the work to its intended audience.

I recently had the opportunity to experience a live performance by Billy Collins and Amy Mann. It was more than the sum of Billy Collins' words and Amy Mann's lyrics. It was choreography. It was interplay. It was an audio visual close encounter with the poet and artist. 

It just doesn't seem like a huge step to include the experience of poetry in the same way. Poetry is melodic. To hear poetry read by the poet; to hear the poet's interpretation of the melody exceeds even the best we can do in reading something we did not write and did not feel as it was created is a "lesser experience." It is, at best, a simulation of the original experience..

To hear the breath of the poet is to experience the heartbeat of the poem.

And thanks to the Library of Congress, we can now get closer to the original poetry than ever before.


brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit


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This Is How To Be Persuasive: 7 New Secrets From Hostage Negotiation

This Is How To Be Persuasive: 7 New Secrets From Hostage Negotiation | AdLit | Scoop.it
Most of what you know about dealing with people is wrong. In this interview, FBI lead hostage negotiator Chris Voss explains how to be persuasive.
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An Open Letter to High School Students about Reading

An Open Letter to High School Students about Reading | AdLit | Scoop.it
Advice for high school students about the importance of reading.

The value of reading as preparation for college should never be underestimated, not even as the focus of higher education turns to STEM majors and career preparation.


Via Mel Riddile
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The Ultimate Guide to Books for Reluctant Readers Ages 12 to 13

The Ultimate Guide to Books for Reluctant Readers Ages 12 to 13 | AdLit | Scoop.it
Wondering how to get reluctant readers ages 12 and 13 flipping those pages? Check out this list of book recommendations and suggestions!
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