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It's Live Now Google’s Suite of its Digital Resources to Journalists: Google Media Tools

It's Live Now Google’s Suite of its Digital Resources to Journalists: Google Media Tools | AdLit | Scoop.it

Excerpt from "Home Page" of the new Google's hub:
"Consider this your starting point to tap into Google’s suite of digital tools that can enhance newsgathering and exposure across television, radio, print and online.

Whether it’s refining your advanced search capabilities, improving audience engagement through Google+, or learning how to visualize data using Google Maps, this website is intended to guide you through all the resources Google offers to journalists."

Here are the sections of this new Google’s Suite:

1. Gather and Organize
- Advanced Search
- Google Trends and Analytics
- Google Consumer Surveys
- Google Drive

2. Publish
- Google News
- Google Images
- Webmaster Central
- Google Analytics
- Custom Search Engine

3. Engage
- Google+ and Hangouts
- YouTube

4. Develop
- Google Web Toolkit
- Google App Engine
- Android developers
- YouTube Partnerships

5. Visualize
- Google Maps Engine
- Google Maps API
- Google Crisis Map
- Google Earth
- Google Earth Engine Timelapse
- Google Fusion Tables
- Google Charts

6. Additional Resources
- Google Politics & Elections
- Transparency Report
- Google Crisis Response

Check out it: http://www.google.com/get/mediatools

Announced by The Next Web some hours ago with this article:
http://thenextweb.com/google/2013/10/16/google-guides-journalists-towards-digital-resources-google-media-tools-hub

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Stephen Dale
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Jorge Izquierdo's curator insight, October 17, 2013 3:24 AM

Google entrando en el periodismo. Todo un paquete de aplicaciones para periodistas.

 

Stephen Dale's curator insight, October 18, 2013 8:46 AM

Google's new suite of digital media tools. It's not just for journalists! #google

thomaslisterman's curator insight, October 20, 2013 6:42 PM

Helpful interface to interact with Google's suite of tools for digital story-telling. 

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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Reading Specialists Resources - LiveBinder

Reading Specialists Resources - LiveBinder | AdLit | Scoop.it

A collection of resources for Reading Specialists on CCSS

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Busywork?: From Classroom Assistant to Agent of Change

Busywork?: From Classroom Assistant to Agent of Change | AdLit | Scoop.it

It’s the day before school starts, hours before the kindergarten classrooms will be filled with parents and students excited to meet their very first teachers at a meet and greet night. The kindergarten teachers are frantically tying loose ends, stapling up final touches, and cutting out laminated bus tags.

In the midst of the chaos, I offered to help and was given the task of compiling parent folders for the meeting that night. Stacks of information were arranged in a semicircle around me. On the left of the ring was a pile of manila folders, on the right was a pile of neatly labeled filled folders.

As a writing coach I’m sometimes hesitant to do this kind of work. I’m concerned about what others will think when I’m making copies, building bulletin boards, and stuffing folders. It would be unfortunate for others to believe an instructional coach doesn’t have enough work to warrant a full-time position. At the same time, I knew this was the most pressing need for the kindergarten teachers.

This is a delicate balance for a coach. To put aside our own to-do lists and instead spend our time relieving stress from teachers by rolling up our sleeves and doing the crucial tasks that they need to complete.

I was in a rhythm, stuffing folders for three teachers, when a voice from the doorway startled me. I jumped when she said, “Are you making writing folders? I’d like to see what you’re putting in them.”

I turned and offered a smile to the teacher in the doorway. “No, I’m making parent folders for the meeting tonight.”

“You do that kind of thing?” Although the question was innocent, I could feel the assumptions being made, the jumps in logic, leading to the wrong conclusion. I could imagine the misunderstood message forming; Coaches are expendable because they don’t have work of their own to do.

Keeping my smile in place, I said, “Today I do.” I finished stuffing the folders. I labeled bus tags. I created sign-up sheets. I wrote a letter to parents. I made copies. I used the paper cutter.

At the end of the day, it wasn’t their gratitude that made me smile. It was the short conversation about launching writing workshop. “Will you come into my classroom and help me?” one of the teachers asked.

“Me too,” the others said.

I smiled. “Absolutely, when do you want to start?”

“How about day two?”

“Perfect.”

This is the reason I stuff folders and make copies. Those were the most pressing needs at the time. It is a universal truth of humans; until our basic needs are met we are not at our full capacity to learn. By making time to work alongside teachers doing the menial, yet essential tasks, I sent the message that I care about their work. The teachers and their goals of preparing for students were more important than an agenda about writing workshop.

This is the message I trust will prevail. As coaches, how do we move from classroom assistant to an agent of change? Often it doesn’t happen as quickly as it did with the kindergarten teachers, and sometimes it can feel almost magical.

It’s not magic though, rather it is intentionally building relationships. By asking ourselves a few questions, we can nudge into our role as a coach while assisting with needed tasks.

Can I get to know more about the teacher’s life? Since my position is a writing coach, it’s expected that most of my conversations will be about teaching writers. However, while stuffing folders or building a bulletin board, I can engage in a conversation about life outside of writing workshop. I like to get to know things like: Why did you become a teacher? What do you do after school? What are you reading right now? These kinds of conversations give me a better-rounded glimpse into the teacher. If she became a teacher because reading was hard and she wants to help others learn to read, then I’m able to angle our discussions about writing with this in mind. If I’m building a bulletin board to house writing workshop charts because the teacher wasn’t sure how to go about creating a space to collect writing instruction, then I’m better prepared as a coach.What are the ways I can use these tasks to develop a conversation about instruction? If a teacher needs help with a conferring record, I can then step into a conversation about conference structure. When a teacher wants help arranging their classroom furniture, I look for an opportunity to talk about establishing a meeting area or a place for small group instruction. Perhaps I take advantage of the opportunity to help the teacher organize small groups instead of rows. We also talk through procedures for empowering collaboration within the classroom. These are rich discussions that wouldn’t happen if I weren’t willing to roll up my sleeves and help with a to-do list that (at first) doesn’t look like it has anything to do with teaching writers.Should I say no to this task? Sometimes I’m asked to do something that doesn’t align with my philosophy of instruction or the goals of writing workshop. If I’m asked to copy a rote drill and practice grammar worksheet, I might ask, “What are your plans for this?” Usually the teacher wants to help students learn and correct an issue in their writing. This gives me the prime opportunity to extend an invitation to teach a minilesson based on student need. Depending on my availability and relationship with the teacher, I might offer to join their workshop and teach a lesson instead of copying the worksheet. Other times, I’ll take a deep breath and copy the worksheet, but also make plans to work together in the near future to incorporate grammar instruction within writing workshop rather than secluded to a worksheet. The tasks that make me prickly are the ones I’m most thankful for. Teachers are doing these things regardless of whether I’m helping them or not. At least I have a realistic understanding of the practices being used in the classroom. This way I can be intentional about the lessons I model and the resources I pass on to teachers in order to nudge growth toward a more genuine version of writing workshop.How will I follow up? If I only offer to assist teachers with their to-do lists and never venture into conversations about teaching writers, I become an assistant and fail to do my job. I make notes in my calendar to send an email or set a meeting in order to begin moving more fully into my role as a coach.

Most importantly, I genuinely care about people. If we treat teachers like projects, manipulating them with kindness in order to shove into our coaching roles, their shackles will rise and our efforts will be counter-productive. Rather, be patient. I remember life is full and sometimes life outside of school is even more chaotic than life within the classroom walls. Every minute I spend time with a teacher, whether it’s about writing workshop or something else, is one step closer to building a solid relationship. When relationships are established and trust is built, an effective and strong teacher-coach partnership is established. It is at this point that we both can begin growing as teachers of writers.

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Three Strategies to Boost English Language Learning in Science and Social Studies

Three Strategies to Boost English Language Learning in Science and Social Studies | AdLit | Scoop.it
By Beth Morrow Though no instructional strategy is better than another, some strategies are more appropriate or applicable to specific content, learners, or purposes. The strategy suggestions in my Math and ELLs post can be used with any content, as can the strategies below. Increasing the achievement of ELLs and struggling learners is all about finding ways to help them understand content so meaningful learning can take place. Manage Vocabulary The days of kill-and-drill vocabulary tests are over—or should be, if long-term retention is the goal. Student success in vocabulary-heavy courses increases exponentially when students have a system and a clear expectation for the vocabulary they are learning. Below are my three favorite strategies I share most often regarding vocabulary. 1. Choose targeted vocabulary to teach. Predetermining the vocabulary most crucial to comprehension will help students build a content knowledge foundation. Yes, we want students to learn all of the vocabulary, but if we expect them to learn everything, their learning begins to resemble tossing spaghetti at a wall: some sticks and some doesn't. Focus their attention on vocabulary that will give the most bang for your buck, and cultivate deeper connections with those words before expanding the list. 2. Have students create a vocabulary collection tool. Having vocabulary disappear into the abyss of the student mind is easy to remedy by providing a word collection tool for reference and reflection. Just putting vocabulary worksheets in a binder doesn't help retention. Have students collect and interact with words in a dedicated notebook. Provide students with templates such as a Frayer model to help establish word relationships. 3. Create vocabulary connections. After you’ve crammed for an exam, what happens to that information once the test is over? Bits and pieces might remain, but the brain is not built for intensive, short-term recall of content learned in isolation. Help boost recall and usage by teaching explicit connections between old and new vocabulary words, and how new terms relate to previous words and concepts through word walls, webs, or mind maps. Build Background Whether through interrupted schooling or late entry, students come to class with varying levels of previous knowledge. Informally probing students’ prior knowledge before presenting new content can greatly improve comprehension. And knowing what students know (or don't) offers insight to help instructors focus new learning. Use simple resources and mini-lessons to bridge content gaps. Building knowledge doesn't require entire class periods and elaborate preparation. Find videos, simple picture books on the same content, lower reading level texts, podcasts, or websites for students to sample in-class or independently. Use Visuals More than other content, success in science and social studies relies on a student's ability to comprehend specific vocabulary and abstract concepts and to recall terms so that they can be connected to new learning. Visuals offer an instant, concrete connection to words and concepts that might otherwise linger in uncertainty. A variety of regalia, props, basic websites, historical documents, scientific illustrations and charts, maps, and timelines are excellent supplements. The depth of prior knowledge and intensity of new vocabulary required to master science and social studies content can intimidate both struggling students and ELLs. Put students in control of their own learning by supplementing difficult content with research-based strategies and watch them soar! More from Beth Morrow. Beth Morrow teaches middle school ESL in Columbus City Schools in Columbus, Ohio. She also blogs on educational and classroom issues at www.canwejustread.com. Connect with her on Twitter: @BethFMorrow.
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The artistic process: Thinking through problems - E Kantipur

The artistic process: Thinking through problems - E Kantipur | AdLit | Scoop.it
The artistic process: Thinking through problems E Kantipur It is that immensely precious time beforehand, the time you spend researching, making notes, and thinking about your nascent idea that is key to being able to finally execute what you see...
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Real-time plagiarism checker debuts for Microsoft Word

Real-time plagiarism checker debuts for Microsoft Word | AdLit | Scoop.it
Academic Wordsmith is a Word app that can check your paper for plagiarism as you're writing it.

Via Joel Bloch
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Achievethecore.org :: Complete Guide to Creating Text-Dependent Questions

Achievethecore.org :: Complete Guide to Creating Text-Dependent Questions | AdLit | Scoop.it
Thorough explanation of the how and why of text-dependent questions for close, analytic reading. Includes examples.

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Susan Gum's curator insight, February 4, 7:55 AM

This site has many great resources including lesson plans.

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English Language Arts and Disciplinary Literacy Websites

English Language Arts and Disciplinary Literacy Websites | AdLit | Scoop.it
Great free resources to support ELA and Disciplinary Literacy CCSS http://t.co/CEdKdsEuZp #ISTE2014

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ETS Launches New Website to Help Educators Strengthen Reading ... - IT News Online

ETS Launches New Website to Help Educators Strengthen Reading ...
IT News Online
... including EL students, to comprehend and engage in complex texts across content areas," explains Wolf.

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J Washburn: Author Blog: What tone should I use when I write an English paper?

J Washburn: Author Blog: What tone should I use when I write an English paper? | AdLit | Scoop.it

The Intro to Washburn's Master's Thesis on Putting Personality in Your Writing...


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Why do we make our students write essays?

Why do we make our students write essays? | AdLit | Scoop.it
The website UnemployedProfessors.com is a research paper mill with a twist. They openly 'diss the entire educational system. Do they have a point, I wonder?

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White Paper: 7 Classroom Routines that Promote Content Literacy Skills > Eye On Education

White Paper: 7 Classroom Routines that Promote Content Literacy Skills > Eye On Education | AdLit | Scoop.it
Everyone knows the story of the young man carrying a violin case, walking down the street in Manhattan. He stops a fellow pedestrian and politely as...

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Clarity Through Brevity: Integrating Six-Word Memoirs

Clarity Through Brevity: Integrating Six-Word Memoirs | AdLit | Scoop.it
At its core, the six-word memoir teaches us to be concise but also introspective. Try describing yourself in six words. Not easy, right?

 

So how does the six-word memoir make sense in a history class? As a history teacher, I am always looking to integrate my class with as many different disciplines as possible. I also try to turn my students away from being just consumers of information and toward being global creators of everything cool. When I learned that the National Writing Project teamed up with Mozilla to create a Thimble webmaking application for six-word memoirs, I began to realize the potential this could have in my history classes.


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 13, 2013 6:45 PM

Who said, "Brevity is the soul of wit..." ? 

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Publications & Resources - Center for the Advancement of Reading

Publications & Resources - Center for the Advancement of Reading | AdLit | Scoop.it

For an overview of the assessments related to the new California Standards, click on the title above or here: http://calstate.edu/car/publications/

 


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Coaching Minute: The Power of Rehearsal (VIDEO)

Coaching Minute: The Power of Rehearsal (VIDEO) | AdLit | Scoop.it

Heather Rader guides a novice coach by sharing the power of rehearsal before leading professional development sessions. A transcript is provided below the player

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What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets

What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets | AdLit | Scoop.it
Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck’s work on growth mindsets has dominated much of the attention around how students can influence their own learning. But there are other ways to help students tap into their own motivation, too. Here are a few other important mindsets to consider.
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Timeline Photos - One-Stop Career Center Nevada | Facebook

Timeline Photos - One-Stop Career Center Nevada | Facebook | AdLit | Scoop.it
If you're new to computers or have some experience, we have a great workshop for you! With our Digital Literacy workshop, you can learn essential skills... (If you're new to computers or have some experience, we have a great workshop for you!
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Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work...

Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work... | AdLit | Scoop.it
A Comprehensive Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work Skills ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on Educación Virtual UNET curated by Jaime Salcedo Luna (A Comprehensive Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work Skills ~...
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Close Reading Infographic | Common Core Oklahom...

Close Reading Infographic | Common Core Oklahom... | AdLit | Scoop.it
“Close Reading Infographic on Common Core Oklahoma curated by Connie Wise (Close Reading Infographic | @scoopit via @dgburris http://t.co/sUYecW0wKx #ccss)...” (Close Reading Infographic | Common Core Oklahoma http://t.co/KqRXvFDDAG...

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Susan Gum's curator insight, October 21, 2013 11:21 AM

Awesome graphic depicting Close Reading!

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Collaborative Strategic Reading Across Content Areas - DEN Blog ...

Collaborative Strategic Reading Across Content Areas - DEN Blog ... | AdLit | Scoop.it
Collaborative Strategic Reading Across Content Areas. March26. Have you heard of Collaborative Strategic Reading? CSR is a collection of organized and scripted strategies that are intended to improve reading comprehension and learning.

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Analytical Writing in the Content Areas | ICT

Analytical Writing in the Content Areas | ICT | AdLit | Scoop.it
Adolescent Literacy Topics A-Z | AdLit.org Many students are used to writing narratives - stories, description, even poetry, but have little experience with analytical writing.

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"Breaking News" Is An Engaging Tool For Reading...News

"Breaking News" Is An Engaging Tool For Reading...News | AdLit | Scoop.it
Breaking News is a current events news-reader designed in an intriguing way. You can type in whatever topic you want to read about -- soccer, major news, refugees -- and you're provided with a list...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Plagiarism checking tool - the most accurate and absolutely FREE! Try now!

Plagiarism checking tool - the most accurate and absolutely FREE! Try now! | AdLit | Scoop.it
The best FREE plagiarism checker. Check your paper online!

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| Understanding Language

| Understanding Language | AdLit | Scoop.it
Understanding Language is devoted to improving education for English Language Learners in light of the new Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards.

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Radical Idea: What if we stopped teaching writing?

Radical Idea: What if we stopped teaching writing? | AdLit | Scoop.it
I have a radical idea. What if we stopped teaching writing and instead focused on the writer? What if we gave our writers the support and guidance they need, but stopped assigning inauthentic writi...
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Learning To Read May Take Longer Than We Thought - NPR (blog)

Learning To Read May Take Longer Than We Thought - NPR (blog) | AdLit | Scoop.it
NPR (blog)
Learning To Read May Take Longer Than We Thought

 

Most of what we know — or think we know — about how kids learn comes from classroom practice and behavioral psychology. Now, neuroscientists are adding to and qualifying that store of knowledge by studying the brain itself. The latest example: new research in the journal Developmental Science suggests a famous phenomenon known as the "fourth-grade shift" isn't so clear-cut.

 

"The theory of the fourth-grade shift had been based on behavioral data," says the lead author of the study, Donna Coch. She heads the Reading Brains Lab at Dartmouth College.

 

The assumption teachers make: "In a nutshell," Coch says, "by fourth grade you stop learning to read and start reading to learn. We're done teaching the basic skills in third grade, and you go use them starting in the fourth."

 

But, Coch's team found, that assumption may not be true.


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A Flipped Reading & Writing Workshop Works Wonders

A Flipped Reading & Writing Workshop Works Wonders | AdLit | Scoop.it
Earlier this year, my principal and ITC suggested that I try flipping the classroom in some way with my 1:1 iPads. My biggest concern with a flipped classroom approach is the loss of interaction st...

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