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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Grades 6-12 English Language Arts & Literacy Resources; Multidisciplinary Embedded Literacy Resources
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VRI at UVM’s Vermont Adolescent Literacy and Learning Initiative | Vermont Reads Institute

VRI at UVM’s Vermont Adolescent Literacy and Learning Initiative | Vermont Reads Institute | AdLit | Scoop.it

Vermont Adolescent Literacy and Learning Initiative, vermont literacy, vermont reading, VALLI


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Peer Review in Action: The ELA EQuIP Rubric

Peer Review in Action: The ELA EQuIP Rubric | AdLit | Scoop.it
How to review and calibrate ELA lessons. Using an EQuIP rubric and peer review, ELA teachers can make better lessons and make sure they are aligned with the Common Core.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from K-12 School Libraries
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Text Complexity? Helping Readers See The Whole Text

Text Complexity? Helping Readers See The Whole Text | AdLit | Scoop.it
Text Complexity? Helping Readers See The Whole Text by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education Selecting Text For Comprehension In the previous literacy posts in this series I identified a few guiding questions that stem from the research: Do students...

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, May 5, 1:15 PM

Fantastic article to share with teachers in your building!

Dr. Laura Sheneman's curator insight, May 5, 4:21 PM

The Texas TEKS and most, if not all, state standards speak about complex texts. 

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Three Ways to Help Students Master the Vocabulary Demands of Complex Texts

Three Ways to Help Students Master the Vocabulary Demands of Complex Texts | AdLit | Scoop.it
Ryan McCarty shares three ways to help your students meet the vocabulary demands of complex texts.
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Shanahan on Literacy: Should We Teach Spelling?

Shanahan on Literacy: Should We Teach Spelling? | AdLit | Scoop.it
 It is included in your educational standards: your community wants kids to spell well.Spelling is related to reading. If your students can spell well, they will read better. Spelling involves both an understanding of how letters and sounds relate, but it also entails an understanding of the meaningful parts of words (think of the differences in pronunciation of the spelling of words like: democracy and Democrat; declaration and declare; or cats and dogs; our spelling system preserves the meaning not the sound-symbol relationship).Spelling is related to writing. Students, when they can spell well, are more willing to use a wide vocabulary (they aren’t constrained by fear of misspelling) and they can devote their cognitive resources to formulating and communicating their ideas, rather than worrying about how to construct words.Spelling problems may draw negative social judgments. Think of Dan Quayle and what people decided about him when he couldn’t spell potato. We also know that writing quality is more likely to be judged negatively by teachers and evaluators when the writing contains misspellings.Although spell check helps to even the playing field, it won’t solve the problem entirely. If your spelling skills aren’t advanced enough the computer won’t be able to figure out what it is that you are trying to write, and many times a computer mis-corrects such words
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from educational implications
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The Interface of Language and Theory of Mind

The Interface of Language and Theory of Mind | AdLit | Scoop.it
The proposal is made that the interface between language and theory of mind is bidirectional. It seems probable that the conceptual developments of early Theory of Mind form an essential basis for helping to fix at least word reference. In development ...

 

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With respect to seeing and perceiving, verbs relating to these matters are common words for two and three year olds, and even in the blind child studied by Landau and Gleitman (1986), who translated sight words such as look,see into the haptic modality. There are other indices in language of a sensitivity to the perspective of another individual, in particular, deictic terms. Words such as I/you, here/there, this/that, come/go all share the property that they switch reference according to the speaker. Does use of these terms entail understanding another's mind? Minimally, they seem to require recognition that the terms align with the spatial position of speaker and listener, and in a dialogue, their meaning changes with the speaker. Use of deixis begins early, and experimentation suggests that children are quite adept by age three or four at using the terms appropriately in well-defined circumstances such as across a barrier that defines “here” and ‘there” in a particular way (de Villiers & de Villiers, 1974; Clark & Sengul, 1978). More subtle uses that relativize space to the domain of talk, such as “Here in my school” (Fillmore, 1957/1997) are undoubtedly later, but less is known about their development. Children with autism have notorious difficulty with deixis, especially pronouns (Tager-Flusberg, 2005), though deaf children do not (Pettito, 1987). Blind children understandably have problems with the spatial deictic terms (Andersen et al., 1993; Mulford, 1983).

The most telling cases may in fact be the third spatial deictic forms that occur in some languages like Spanish and Japanese, in which there is a form for “distal from both speaker and listener”, namely “yonder”. Miyamoto (p.c.) has suggested that use of this term more so than the ordinary deictics reflects an understanding of the listener's perspective, because the speaker has to judge not only what is far from himself, but what is far from both of them.

Returning to the words for sensory experience, we do not know when children appreciate the distinction betweenlook at and look for, and between see and look at. In addition we do not yet know at what age children understand the distinction between see and see that. Consider also related distinctions, such as the epistemic meaning of the modal must, e.g. “Daddy must be home” said because the child sees his bicycle on the porch. Acquisition evidence from Papafragou, (1998), Fond, (2003) and Heizmann (2006) found the epistemic “must” meaning emerging sometime around age 3.5-4.5 across several languages.

In terms of the directionality of the interface in this domain, it is generally assumed that the conceptual understanding precedes the linguistic mapping of the relevant forms, but there is no research that has correlated the two. We lack nonverbal tasks of the concepts, as well as careful linguistic work on the contrasts, done with the same children. Most importantly, we need work done with children who have language delay, to see if they are still on target developmentally with the concepts even when their associated language forms are delayed. Such work is missing at the moment for Theory of Mind accomplishments that emerge before the development of false belief.

  


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In The Media: Expanding Students' Experience with Academic Vocabulary

In The Media: Expanding Students' Experience with Academic Vocabulary | AdLit | Scoop.it
When students learn conceptually challenging academic vocabulary words in school, do students notice them beyond school, or do they tune into the new words only during formal vocabulary lessons?
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Compare, Contrast, Comprehend: Using Compare-Contrast Text Structures with ELLs in K-3 Classrooms

Compare, Contrast, Comprehend: Using Compare-Contrast Text Structures with ELLs in K-3 Classrooms | AdLit | Scoop.it
It is a brisk October day in Chicago during my first year of teaching. I (Jennifer, second author) am seated at a small table in the back of the classroom, surrounded by the members of my on-level guided reading group. The six second-grade students in the group are getting ready to read a short nonfiction trade book about spiders that is a required text in our regular reading series. The book uses a straightforward compare-contrast text structure to present information about spiders, comparing and contrasting them first with insects and then with other arachnids, like scorpions.
Lynnette Van Dyke's insight:

This article explains (a) how to teach students to identify the compare-contrast text structure, and to use this structure to support their comprehension, (b) how to use compare-contrast texts to activate and extend students' background knowledge, and (c) how to use compare-contrast texts to help students expand and enrich their vocabulary. Although these strategies can benefit all young learners, the compare-contrast text structure is particularly helpful to ELL students.

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Guiding Students Through Expository Text with Text Feature Walks

Guiding Students Through Expository Text with Text Feature Walks | AdLit | Scoop.it
Most primary students have used the picture walk technique to preview text (Stahl, 2004). By looking at and talking about the illustrations in a text, students activate prior knowledge, make predictions, and set a purpose for reading (Clay, 1991; Fountas & Pinnell, 1996). Effective primary teachers use this instructional strategy when teaching students how to read (Taylor, 2002), yet this supportive practice is not as common when students read expository text and is often discarded as students move from reading picture books to chapter books.
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Building Capacity for Sustained Change: Characteristics of Common Core Implementation Models that Actually Work

Building Capacity for Sustained Change: Characteristics of Common Core Implementation Models that Actually Work | AdLit | Scoop.it

In this article from Michigan Reading Journal (Vol. 47, No. 1, 2014)  KaiLonnie Dunsmore and Catherine Nelson of the National Center for Literacy Education (NCLE) help educators look beyond the specifics of the instructional changes called for in Common Core to the big picture of how change happens (or doesn’t happen) in schools.
 

They compare two distinct policy approaches to education change, share findings from two national studies of Common Core implementation, and provide recommendations for implementing Common Core standards in a way that will support building local capacity.
 

Overall, they encourage educators and leaders to "spend as much time on identifying effective change strategies . . . as on the content and goals of the standards themselves." Lasting improvements in classroom instruction for all students will only occur, they say, when we harness the possibilities of capacity-building approaches.  

  

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Useful Resources for teachers of English
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How To Be Organised About Learning New Vocabulary - Fluent in 3 months - Language Hacking and Travel Tips

How To Be Organised About Learning New Vocabulary - Fluent in 3 months - Language Hacking and Travel Tips | AdLit | Scoop.it
In today's guest post, Kerstin from fluent language shares her thoughts on learning new vocabulary. Enjoy!
My name is Kerstin and I’m a dictionary fiend.
Via Ana Lara
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Grades 6-12 English Language Arts & Literacy Resources; Multidisciplinary Embedded Literacy Resources
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How Important is Teaching Literacy in All Content Areas?

How Important is Teaching Literacy in All Content Areas? | AdLit | Scoop.it
Literacy instruction is the responsibility of all educators -- regardless of the content they teach.

Via Kris Breen
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Kris Breen's curator insight, July 15, 2014 2:09 PM

Content literacy is key.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Grades 6-12 English Language Arts & Literacy Resources; Multidisciplinary Embedded Literacy Resources
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Dr. Jeffrey Wilhelm | Books

Dr. Jeffrey Wilhelm | Books | AdLit | Scoop.it

Official website of Dr. Jeffrey D. Wilhelm, expertise in teaching reluctant and struggling readers through a variety of multimodal techniques to foster greater strategic competence and understanding.


Via Kris Breen
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Kris Breen's curator insight, January 9, 8:25 AM
"We wanted to consider what might happen if we could unite our goals as teachers with the passions of our students as readers.” Jeff Wilhelm
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Becoming Literate Update by Marie Clay - Heinemann Publishing

Becoming Literate Update by Marie Clay - Heinemann Publishing | AdLit | Scoop.it

Marie Clay is one of history’s most powerful voices on literacy development. But, despite her passing, that voice lives on to inspire new generations. The Marie Clay Literacy Trust is reissuing Marie’s work so that younger educators and researchers can benefit from it. And so that veterans in the field can pass it on to those following in their footsteps.

 

Becoming Literate: Marie’s characteristically rich description of the predictable developmental changes that allow children to gain control over print

 

Change Over Time: A culmination of research, neurological science, and thirty years of Marie’s experience with learners that shows how kids develop literacy processing systems

 

Biks and Gutches and the Record of Oral Language: Practical, fast tests of children’s understanding of conventional language and of changes in their oral language development

 

Sand and Stones: These beloved classics are finally in full color! All text and features remain the same for use in the Concepts About Print test.

 

We hope you’ll enjoy these reissues and pass them on to your mentees, fellow teachers, or students so they can develop the deep expertise needed to effectively teach reading.

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from TeachingEnglish
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Spelling doesn't have to mean Test

Spelling doesn't have to mean Test | AdLit | Scoop.it
Are bureaucrats dangerous? I want to tell you about how I adapted my advanced students’ favourite spelling activity for lower levels –all the way down to beginner.  The original activity called Thr...

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"Critical Thinking Crash Course" by Dr. Peter Boghossian - YouTube

Dr. Peter Boghossian's May 11th public lecture, "Critical Thinking Crash Course" The following public lecture was delivered May 11th at the Intel Campus in H...
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Cool School Ideas
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Online Peer Reviews Improve Literacy Instruction

Online Peer Reviews Improve Literacy Instruction | AdLit | Scoop.it

From the International Literacy Association's Literacy Daily


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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from educational implications
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The Influence of Language on Theory of Mind: A Training Study

The Influence of Language on Theory of Mind: A Training Study | AdLit | Scoop.it
This study investigated the role of language in the development of theory of mind. It was hypothesized that the acquisition of the syntactic and semantic properties of sentential complements would facilitate the development of a representational theory ...

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Sharrock's curator insight, May 1, 10:51 AM

excerpt: "A number of different theoretical approaches have been proposed to explain the developments that take place in theory of mind at this stage, including nativist, conceptual change and simulation theories (e.g., Fodor, 1992;Gopnik, 1993; Gordon, 1996;Harris, 1992; Leslie & Roth, 1993; Perner, 1991; Russell, 1996; Wellman, 1990). Two main classes of theories have come to dominate the empirical literature: the ‘theory theory,’ which argues that at this stage children undergo fundamental conceptual changes in their understanding of mind (e.g., Gopnik, 1993;Perner, 1991; Wellman, 1990); and performance-based approaches which claim that developments in theory of mind are the results of other more general cognitive changes, rather than domain-specific conceptual change. Performance-based accounts divide into two groups: nativist modular theories, which claim that much younger children have a metarepresentational concept of belief, but are limited by other cognitive factors in their performance on false belief tasks (e.g., Fodor, 1992; Leslie & Roth, 1993); and executive function theories, which claim there are fundamental conceptual changes in theory of mind that take place at four, that are brought about by developments in executive processes such as working memory and inhibitory control (cf. Russell, 1996)."

 

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Willingham: Self-image matters: Helping kids see themselves as readers

Willingham: Self-image matters: Helping kids see themselves as readers | AdLit | Scoop.it
The last of five posts about kids and reading by cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham.

 

"Self-image matters. Children must not only have a positive attitude towards reading, they must see themselves as the kind of kid who reads."


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Increasing Student Reading Comprehension with Non-fiction Text

Kids need to be able to learn to read text for meaning … (and ask themselves) "Do I know why I'm reading this? Do I know what information I'm looking for?" … We're always delivering the curriculum in a way that draws on language and reading skills.— Dr. Nonie Lesaux
Lynnette Van Dyke's insight:

One of the most important skills students learn as they transition into middle and high school is how to get information from a non-fiction text. This skill can be especially challenging for ELLs, who may not have had much experience working independently with expository texts. This Bright Ideas article offers ways that teachers can help ELLs work effectively with non-fiction texts and includes strategies for introducing components, structure, and purpose of expository texts.

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Building World Knowledge: Motivating Children to Read and Enjoy Informational Text

Building World Knowledge: Motivating Children to Read and Enjoy Informational Text | AdLit | Scoop.it
Young children benefit from opportunities to read a rich array of fiction and informational books. Reading educators and researchers agree that young children benefit from increased exposure to informational books (Snow, Burns, & Griffin, 1998). Today there is an abundance of high-quality informational text for teachers and parents to use with children. According the Cooperative Children's Book Center (2006), the number of informational books published for the early grades has increased by 200% over the last ten years.
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Everyone Has an Important Role to Play

Everyone Has an Important Role to Play | AdLit | Scoop.it
Sharing Leadership




"There's a lot of wisdom in the room. We know what the problems are, we know what the areas of need are, there's a lot of research out there. By us coming tog
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