AdLit
Follow
Find
6.0K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
onto AdLit
Scoop.it!

How to Analyze Literature Better by Watching Football

How to Analyze Literature Better by Watching Football | AdLit | Scoop.it
Learning about literature by watching football.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, December 5, 2013 6:42 PM

5 Dec 2013

Well there you go!

Your thoughts? Can this unexpected take on ways to support students in their study of literature expand the paradigms within which we seek more and more effective ways to engage our students in pursuing the treasures with which Literary reading can enrich our lives?

 

Heck, I think I'll even be a more thoughtful football fan too.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 educational nonprofit.

Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, December 6, 2013 12:09 AM

War Eagle!  (Sorry, but I had to say it.)

From around the web

AdLit
Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

Vocabulary: Key Is Quality of Conversation, Not Number of Words

Vocabulary: Key Is Quality of Conversation, Not Number of Words | AdLit | Scoop.it
A seminal study on the early word gap between the children of college graduates and high school dropouts has led to more nuanced findings about language development.

Via Mel Riddile
Lynnette Van Dyke's insight:
Mel Riddile's insight:The researchers found that, on average, children from professional families heard more than 2,150 words an hour. Those in working-class families heard about 1,250 words. Children in families on welfare heard little more than 600 words an hour."It's not just the word gap; it's what you use language for," said Barbara T. Bowman, a child-development professor and co-founder of the Chicago-based Erikson Institute.Children of professionals also heard twice as many unique words, and twice as many "encouraging" versus "discouraging" conversations ("What did you think of that?" versus "Don't touch that," for example.) By the end of the study, more than 85 percent of the vocabulary, conversational patterns, and language complexity of the 3-year-olds had come from their families, and children of professionals had vocabularies more than twice as large as peers in families receiving welfare.children with an "enriched language environment" hear about 20,000 words a day—22 million words by age 3—while disadvantaged children hear half as many or fewer.But if recent studies shrunk the word gap from the Hart and Risley study, they also magnified the importance of parent-child conversations."Conversational turns are vastly more important than the number of words a child is exposed to," Ms. Gilkerson said. Note to teachers: Purposeful classroom discussion is critical to acquisition of vocabulary.
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, April 24, 12:29 PM
  • The researchers found that, on average, children from professional families heard more than 2,150 words an hour. Those in working-class families heard about 1,250 words. Children in families on welfare heard little more than 600 words an hour.
  • "It's not just the word gap; it's what you use language for," said Barbara T. Bowman, a child-development professor and co-founder of the Chicago-based Erikson Institute.
  • Children of professionals also heard twice as many unique words, and twice as many "encouraging" versus "discouraging" conversations ("What did you think of that?" versus "Don't touch that," for example.) By the end of the study, more than 85 percent of the vocabulary, conversational patterns, and language complexity of the 3-year-olds had come from their families, and children of professionals had vocabularies more than twice as large as peers in families receiving welfare.
  • children with an "enriched language environment" hear about 20,000 words a day—22 million words by age 3—while disadvantaged children hear half as many or fewer.
  • But if recent studies shrunk the word gap from the Hart and Risley study, they also magnified the importance of parent-child conversations.
  • "Conversational turns are vastly more important than the number of words a child is exposed to," Ms. Gilkerson said.
Note to teachers: Purposeful classroom discussion is critical to acquisition of vocabulary.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

4 powerful ways to implement blogging in the classroom - Daily Genius

4 powerful ways to implement blogging in the classroom - Daily Genius | AdLit | Scoop.it
Blogging is a popular activity in classrooms today because it allows students to share their writing with a broader audience and teachers to communicate with parents. There are a myriad of platforms to choose from: edublogs, Kidblog (especially good for elementary age children), Blogger, wordpress, and most LMS systems have a blogging platform built in.

How to set up blogging in the classroom will depend on your platform, and is pretty easy to figure out with all of the “how-to” videos and help center collections. What teachers most often ask me is why they would set up a blog for their class. What value is there in a class blog?

Here are some great ideas and applications for class and/or individual student blogs that you can explore in your classroom.

Via John Evans
more...
Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 24, 10:16 AM

Definitely some great ideas for implementing blogging.

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 25, 3:31 PM

Aplicaci'on de los blog en el aula.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Literature & Psychology
Scoop.it!

Teen opinion: how dystopian fiction calls me to the wild side - The Guardian

Teen opinion: how dystopian fiction calls me to the wild side - The Guardian | AdLit | Scoop.it
As the world becomes ever more urbanised and with fewer opportunities to connect to the wild, teens are turning to dystopian fiction, such as The Hunger Games and Divergent, to get their fix of nature...

Via Mary Daniels Brown
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Literacy in Adolescence
Scoop.it!

The Implementation of Social Software in Authentic Literacy Activities - Student Pulse

The Implementation of Social Software in Authentic Literacy Activities - Student Pulse | AdLit | Scoop.it
While international literacy results show Canada maintaining a strong standing, there have been declines in the results for both traditional and digital literacy in several provinces, including New Brunswick.

Via Katherine Kedey
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Using Think-Alouds to Improve Reading Comprehension

Using Think-Alouds to Improve Reading Comprehension | AdLit | Scoop.it
7 Qualities of a Good Reader

Great reading is more than just sounding out letters and words. It involves thinking on many levels. When teachers use modeling, coached practice, and reflection, they can help their students to think while they read and build their comprehension.

Good readers:

Draw on background knowledge as they readMake predictions as they readVisualize the events of a text as they readRecognize confusion as they readRecognize a text's structure as they readIdentify a purpose for readingMonitor their purpose for reading the text

Source: http://www.readingrockets.org/article/using-think-alouds-improve-reading-comprehension ;

Using Think-Alouds to Model Thinking and Reading

Teachers use think-alouds to model the relationship between thinking and reading. They verbalize their thought processes and demonstrate connections that good readers make between background knowledge and information in a text.

This video segment also comes with a downloadable study guide that summarizes the concepts presented and offers reflection questions as well as links to additional resources for teaching reading comprehension.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core and ELA + Math instruction
Scoop.it!

25Hiccoughs that Ruin Writing Style


Via Helen Teague
more...
Helen Teague's curator insight, December 7, 2014 10:13 PM

originally seen at Orange Crate Art written by Michael Leddy

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core and ELA + Math instruction
Scoop.it!

The Socratic Process - 6 Steps of Questioning (Infographic)

The Socratic Process - 6 Steps of Questioning (Infographic) | AdLit | Scoop.it
Hola: Una infografía sobre el proceso socrático. Un saludo

Via Beth Dichter, Helen Teague
more...
Audrey's comment, August 9, 2013 7:31 AM
I agree Teri. It encourages reading and encourages students to be in charge of their learning.
Audrey's curator insight, August 9, 2013 7:39 AM

Using the Socratic process the educator is a tutor.  The process  encourages evaluative and analytical thinking.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 9, 2013 12:55 PM

This is an easy and yet thorough infographic.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from hooked on creativity
Scoop.it!

Sir Ken Robinson: Creativity Is In Everything, Especially Teaching

Sir Ken Robinson: Creativity Is In Everything, Especially Teaching | AdLit | Scoop.it
Creativity can seem like an abstract concept, but having a definition can give a learner the power to practice it on a regular basis.

Via iPamba
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Reading Instruction

Reading Instruction | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Assessing the Cognitive Demands of a Century of Reading Curricula: An Analysis of Reading Text and Comprehension Tasks From 1910 to 2000" 

 

Contrary to popular belief, primary reading texts have not been "dumbed down" in recent years, a new analysis in the American Educational Research Journal finds.

Researchers from Pennsylvania State University, Northern Illinois University, and the Agnes Irwin School in Rosemont, Pa., analyzed the text complexity and the comprehension required in reading assignments in 187 reading textbooks for 3rd grade and 71 such textbooks for 6th grade published between 1905 and 2004.

While basal readers became simpler through the first half of the 20th century, starting in 1970 they included more sophisticated vocabulary and made more cognitive demands of students. For example, textbooks asked on average 16 comprehension questions per story in the 1920s, but 48 questions per story in the 2000s.

By Sarah D. Sparks

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from English Listening Lessons
Scoop.it!

LessonResources For Earth Day - Green Tourism

LessonResources For Earth Day - Green Tourism | AdLit | Scoop.it
This free interactive lesson about environmentally friendly ways to explore England's capital city is designed to help advanced English learners improve their vocabulary, practise their listening skills, and prepare for the Life in The UK Citizenship Test. Watch a short video about green tourism in London, learn and review some useful English words and expressions, and complete an IELTS style multiple choice listening quiz. Practise your English with our free series of online lessons about British life, history, places and people.

Via Sue Lyon-Jones
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Cool School Ideas
Scoop.it!

7 Apps to Help Anyone Improve Their English Grammar

7 Apps to Help Anyone Improve Their English Grammar | AdLit | Scoop.it
In a world of spellcheck and texting abbreviations, few people want to take the time to learn about subjects, objects, and dangling modifiers. Besides, computers can fix our sentences for us. However, as anyone who's suffered an autocorrect embarrassment knows, computers don't always get it right. Language is a human tool and requires the insight of…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Cindy Riley Klages
more...
Ricard Garcia's curator insight, April 23, 2:40 AM

Good "on-the-go" tools for grammar reference... let's go mobile!

Joseph J Filoramo's curator insight, April 23, 9:13 AM

#filoramoroxpd #filoramoroxpddiffcoll

Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, April 25, 2:24 PM

Here could be a reason for students to use their cell phones in class during down time.  Three of the apps discussed are free and a few more are under $2.  They offer workbook like practice in the selected grammar area.

Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Sneak Peek: How to Motivate Reluctant Learners Keynote Luncheon

Sneak Peek: How to Motivate Reluctant Learners Keynote Luncheon | AdLit | Scoop.it
Join ASCD author Robyn Jackson to learn the four keys to motivating students at her keynote luncheon at the ASCD Conference on Teaching Excellence, Friday, June 26, in Nashville, Tenn.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

The Ideas of Socrates - YouTube

In this lecture we examine the ideas of Socrates. We look at his exhortation to 'care for your soul', his conviction that knowledge of virtue is necessary to...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Literature & Psychology
Scoop.it!

The case for young adult literature - The Stanford Daily

For most of us here at Stanford, young adult literature is a thing of the past.

 

Ultimately, though, we should read YA because it’s fun. Most YA novels are real page-turners and almost impossible to put down. Additionally, you get all the benefits of reading without the pressure of reading something extremely linguistically dense. You won’t end up having to look up every other word because you’re not fluent in Olde English. Young adult literature can feel really relevant to things that we’re dealing with in our own lives, even if the characters are sometimes slightly younger than we are. It deals with a lot of firsts (first loves, first experiences with illicit substances, first instances of having to take real responsibility for actions), that most of us can to relate well.


Via Mary Daniels Brown
more...
Mary Daniels Brown's curator insight, April 23, 2:32 PM

A Stanford student defends reading YA literature.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Ed Tech Integration
Scoop.it!

4 Paths to Engaging Authentic Purpose and Audience

4 Paths to Engaging Authentic Purpose and Audience | AdLit | Scoop.it
Give students a face for their audience and let them find the passion in their message through problem solving, advocacy, raising awareness, or publication.

Via Simon Vasey
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core and ELA + Math instruction
Scoop.it!

Tips for creating Scenario Based Learning

Tips for creating Scenario Based Learning | AdLit | Scoop.it
Scenario based learning is very effective when employees must be given real world practice before they actually try their hand on a new role. These ‘scenarios’ or ‘situations’ are created to mimic typical, real experiences that a given employee would have on a day of his/her job. SBL is best applied when it requires learners to apply critical thinking and decision making skills and learn from failures or successful outcomes. However, for that to happen, instructional designers must be able to create scenarios that are a relevant and successful blend of the different factors that can trigger such critical thinking and decision making.

Via Edumorfosis, Helen Teague
more...
Helen Teague's curator insight, April 6, 9:11 AM

works for students too

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Common Core and ELA + Math instruction
Scoop.it!

Is your Classroom Student Centered?

Is your Classroom Student Centered? | AdLit | Scoop.it
Is your Classroom Student Centered? Here are questions that will help you find an answer to this question

Via Helen Teague
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Reading Comprehension Strategies | School Improvement Network

Reading Comprehension Strategies | School Improvement Network | AdLit | Scoop.it
Teaching reading comprehension to your students is not a one-size-fits-all prospect. Here are three strategies you can walk through with your students and use to accelerate their comprehension.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lynnette Van Dyke
Scoop.it!

Assessing the Cognitive Demands of a Century of Reading Curricula

Assessing the Cognitive Demands of a Century of Reading Curricula:An Analysis of Reading Text and Comprehension Tasks From 1910 to 2000

 

 

Robert J. Stevens, Xiaofei Lu, David P. Baker--Penn State University

Melissa N. Ray,Northern Illinois University

Sarah A. Eckert,Agnes Irwin School

David A. Gamson, Pennsylvania State University

 

Abstract:

This research investigated the cognitive demands of reading curricula from 1910 to 2000. We considered both the nature of the text used and the comprehension tasks asked of students in determining the cognitive demands of the curricula. Contrary to the common assumption of a trend of simplification of the texts and comprehension tasks in third- and sixth-grade curricula, the results indicate that curricular complexity declined early in the century and leveled off over the middle decades but has notably increased since the 1970s, particularly for the third-grade curricula.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Teacher Tools and Tips
Scoop.it!

BPS Research Digest: As soon as they can read, children trust text instructions over spoken information

BPS Research Digest: As soon as they can read, children trust text instructions over spoken information | AdLit | Scoop.it

Corriveau's team said their results showed that once children learn to read, "they rapidly come to regard the written word as a particularly authoritative source of information about how to act in the world." They added that in some ways this result is difficult to explain. Young readers are exposed to a good deal of fantasy and fiction in written form, so why should they be so trusting of written instruction? Perhaps they are used to seeing adults act on the basis of written information - such as maps, menus, and recipes - but then again, pre-readers will also have had such experiences. This suggests there's something special about the process of learning to read that leads children to perceive written instruction as authoritative.


Via Sharrock
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Useful Resources for teachers of English
Scoop.it!

9 Free Tools For Digital Storytelling

9 Free Tools For Digital Storytelling | AdLit | Scoop.it

Stories are important. Whether one tells a story to evoke emotion or to gain a new client, there’s a certain simplicity


Via Ana Lara
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path
Scoop.it!

Teach Your Students How to Paraphrase

Teach Your Students How to Paraphrase | AdLit | Scoop.it

We know that paraphrasing is a tricky thing for students to fully comprehend. When your students know how to properly paraphrase, they’ll be able to effectively and ethically discuss another person’s ideas using their own voice. But if they don’t, they could be plagiarizing!


Via Elizabeth E Charles
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Young Adult Novels
Scoop.it!

POLL: What are your favorite 2015 books so far?

POLL: What are your favorite 2015 books so far? | AdLit | Scoop.it
It's already April and that means we have had three months of new books to enjoy. So what are the books you've read so far this year that you just love and can't wait to share with your friends, yo...

Via BJ Neary
more...
BJ Neary's curator insight, April 7, 7:09 PM

So many great titles but I have one question- is it books published in 2015 or ones that we have read in 2015?