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Nancie Atwell Responds to Choice in Reading Workshop

Nancie Atwell Responds to Choice in Reading Workshop | AdLit | Scoop.it
You must, must, must watch this video.  Nancie Atwell responds to the recent NY Times article regarding Reading Workshop.  I found myself wanting to shout, "Yes, yes, yes! You go, girl!" while Nanc...
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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Reading Plus Webinar featuring David Pearson: Knowledge, Motivation, and Learning Strategies - YouTube

In the final webinar of the Reading Plus® series for Spring 2014, Dr. P. David Pearson presents "Knowledge, Motivation, and Learning Strategies: A Balanced R...
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Beyond Common Core: Creating Stronger Links Between Literacy and Subject Matter Learning - YouTube

Panel Discussion from "Beyond Common Core: Creating Stronger Links Between Literacy and Subject Matter Learning," a symposium that took place in Groton, CT o...
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Dr. P. David Pearson: Implementing the CCSS: Comprehension, Close Reading, and the Common Core - YouTube

Dr. P. David Pearson from the University of California, Berkeley speaks on "Implementing the CCSS: Comprehension, Close Reading, and the Common Core" at a sy...
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Padagogy Wheel gets an Upgrade: Bloom’s Taxonomy, iPad apps and Learner Characteristics

Padagogy Wheel gets an Upgrade: Bloom’s Taxonomy, iPad apps and Learner Characteristics | AdLit | Scoop.it
Good friend and mentor Allan Carrington recently enhanced his "Padagogy Wheel" a visual representation of how iPad apps can be integrated into learning experiences using Bloom's Taxonomy.

Via John Evans, James I., Christina Hayden
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Jim Lerman's curator insight, July 10, 2013 5:18 PM

Allan Carrington has done some outstanding work with his (currrently) 3 iterations of the Padagogy Wheet. It is definitely worth it to go to his blog and explore the development of the framwork from its origins. 

 

It is important, too, to acknowledge the work of Andrew Churches and Kathy Schrock, and quite a few others, in elaborating this conceptual scheme.

 

We should also pause and remember that Bllom's taxonomy has 3 domains, not just the single Cognitive domain. The  Affective and Psychomotor are equally as imporant. If we focus on content only, to the exclusion of social, emotional, nutritiional, and fitness expectations, we miseducate our students, shortchanging their development in significant ways.

Pauline Wilson's curator insight, July 12, 2013 6:09 PM

Another great example of how Web 2.0 tools fit into Blooms Taxonomy

James I.'s curator insight, August 20, 2014 9:57 AM

Bloom's Wheel with iPad apps including SAMR model

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More Argument, Fewer Standards - by Mike Schmoker and Gerald Graff

To succeed, students can’t simply amass information (as important as that is); they must also weigh its value and use it to resolve conflicting opinions, offer solutions, and propose reasonable recommendations. The same could be said for the demands of citizenship and the modern workplace.

Via Heather J Hanson
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Determine an author's bias - for teachers | LearnZillion

Determine an author's bias - for teachers | LearnZillion | AdLit | Scoop.it
In this lesson you will learn to determine the author’s bias by asking, "What information is left out and why?" This lesson focuses on the article, "The Little Owls that Live Underground" from http://www.smithsonian.com
- for teachers

Via Heather J Hanson
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Martha Nussbaum - The Value of the Humanities

http://www.philosophybites.com/ Martha Nussbaum received her BA from NYU and her MA and PhD from Harvard. She has taught at Harvard, Brown, and Oxford Univer... (Recently read Martha Nussbaum's book on humanities, Not For Profit.


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Types of Nonverbal Communication That Aid in Teaching Writing

Types of Nonverbal Communication That Aid in Teaching Writing | AdLit | Scoop.it

Because writing is a verbal activity, teachers need to use various types of nonverbal communication as examples and cues for struggling writers who are non verbal.


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RoadtoGrammar.com - Free quizzes, notes and games to improve your grammar

RoadtoGrammar.com - Free quizzes, notes and games to improve your grammar | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Chris Carter
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Chris Carter's curator insight, June 29, 11:35 AM

Brilliant! I have been looking for just this thing! Tons of grammar quizzes, grouped by specific skill.

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Reading Plus Congratulates West Port High School - YouTube

Reading Plus, the online reading intervention that changes how, what, and why students read, is pleased to congratulate administrators, teachers, and student...
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Dr. John T. Guthrie: Fostering Deep Engagement in Disciplinary Literacy - YouTube

Dr. John T. Guthrie from the University of Maryland, College Park speaks on "Fostering Deep Engagement in Disciplinary Literacy" at a symposium in Groton, CT...
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Dr. Elfrieda H. Hiebert: The First Key to Unlocking Complex Text: A Generative Vocabulary - YouTube

Dr. Elfrieda H. Hiebert from TextProject.org and the University of California, Santa Cruz speaks on "The First Key to Unlocking Complex Text: A Generative Vo...
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LEVERS, DOK, and Bloom - YouTube

Published on Jul 21, 2013

Ferdi Serim describes the role Depth of Knowledge plays in Common Core and how the LEVERS system helps educators and students prepare for higher levels of performance. This presentation is based on Karin Hess's Cognitive Rigor Matrix. (To download the full article describing the development and uses of the Cognitive Rigor Matrix and other support CRM materials, go to: http://www.nciea.org/publications/cog...)

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Analyze how an idea is developed over the course of a text - for teachers | LearnZillion

Analyze how an idea is developed over the course of a text - for teachers | LearnZillion | AdLit | Scoop.it
In this lesson you will determine how a central idea is developed by listing details that validate the author’s central idea. This lesson focuses on the article, "The Little Owls that Live Underground" from http://www.smithsonian.com
- for teachers
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What Motivates A Student’s Interest in Reading and Writing

What Motivates A Student’s Interest in Reading and Writing | AdLit | Scoop.it
Educator Larry Ferlazzo details how to make reading and writing relevant to students lives in order to motivate them.

Via Heather J Hanson
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A Brief History of Young Adult Books | Blog | Epic Reads

A Brief History of Young Adult Books | Blog | Epic Reads | AdLit | Scoop.it
We pretty much breathe, eat, and sleep all things young adult books, but where did it come from? What’s the actual definition? Let us break down everything you need to know about how YA came about!

Via Heather J Hanson
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Literacy and Learning: Literacy Strategies

Literacy and Learning: Literacy Strategies | AdLit | Scoop.it

Literacy and Learning's exhaustive list of effective literacy strategies. To view these documents, you must have Adobe® Acrobat Reader installed.


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Text Complexity 102: Lost in Translation | Burkins & Yaris

Text Complexity 102: Lost in Translation | Burkins & Yaris | AdLit | Scoop.it

Essential Question: How well are teachers integrating quantitative measures with qualitative and individual reader/text variables when making decisions about grade level complex text?

 

Example: Patrick Henry’s Speech against the Constitution

In spite of its Lexile measure of 810 (Quantitative), which places this text quantitatively in a category appropriate for fourth and fifth graders,the qualitative factors of explicit vs. implicit meanings and word choice were readily apparent.This text raised issues in the reader and task department as well. Without the appropriate context (reader) this text was hard for Kim, a proficient, adult reader, implying that it would present even greater challenges to twelve-year-olds.

Misinterpretations

Administrators - We have encountered administrators asking teachers to report the Lexile numbers of the texts they are selecting and, if they don’t fall within the confines of the Lexile chart, they scold teachers for not challenging students.Teachers - We have also observed teachers who would see the 810 associated with Patrick Henry’s speech and say, “That is not hard enough for my seventh graders.” When we overgeneralize in this manner, potentially good ideas become bad ideas and instruction becomes “littered with the remains of educational trends lost in translation” (Croft and Burkins, 2010, p. xv).

Reminders:

Text complexity is more than just a quantitative measure.The theory behind text complexity is solid and by honoring the three criteria for measuring it, we are presented a promising method for raising reading proficiency.


Via Mel Riddile, DrKJenkins
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5 Tips for a More Meaningful Rubric

5 Tips for a More Meaningful Rubric | AdLit | Scoop.it

Teachers who use rubrics:

set clear guidelines and expectations from the outset of the school year.hold students accountable for the work they produce in a justifiable way.let their students know on which areas they need concentrate the next time they are given a similar task.see improvement in their students’ work.

Teachers who do not use rubrics:

leave students without clear guidance on which skill areas they need to improve.do not provide students with concrete evidence of what their work lacked.do not provide sufficient guidance on what the student outcome was meant to be in the first place.

Basically, students who do not receive a rubric at the outset of an assignment feel frustration because they are not given specific parameters.  It is human nature to want to know exactly what is expected of us when we set out to do something.  Explicit guidelines lead students towards understanding what they need to do and, ultimately, what they did and did not do well. 

Many teachers I meet want to use rubrics, but they do not know what to include on them.  This, of course, will vary depending upon the grade levels you teach, your subject area, and the task at hand.  However, teachers should keep a few things in mind when creating quality rubrics:

Be consistent. You should plainly lay out your expectations from day one by giving your students the criteria you will assess with throughout the year. You can show them from the get-go how they can approach, meet, or exceed your expectations. For example, if you are going to give a writing exercise, your rubric for that skill should vary little from one assignment to the next. Base them around the skills you are assessing. The memorization of rote facts does little to exemplify how skilled students are at performing in the subject you teach. I know this firsthand because I am a Spanish teacher who once upon a time made her students memorize verb tenses completely out of context. Yes, many of them were capable of remembering and regurgitating them for a test, but then, they could not use them in a real world scenario. Now, I ask them to use language in a specific scenario and assess them using rubrics that measure their growth as communicative language students. I assess particular skills such as their ability to create with language, their ability to function in different time frames, their comprehensibility, and much more. I do not ask for specifics such as 5 uses of the preterite or 10 vocabulary words from the unit. Instead, they have to complete the task using what they know from our current unit, previous units, and even, previous levels of language study.Use clear language. If the language you use on the rubric is full of educational jargon, you cannot expect your students to understand it. You must keep your expectations and criteria for measuring them clear. Tell them exactly what they need to do and which skills you will be measuring. I also recommend that, before using a rubric to grade your students, have them grade a sample assessment using the same rubric you will use to grade their work. This will help familiarize them with the skills you seek. Embrace the positive. When you use a rubric, you indicate clearly the criteria you seek.  And, normally, students do well in one, two, or several of the categories on which you assess them. If they end up with a low grade overall, they are not just seeing a confidence deflating '70' on the page, they are also buoyed by encouraging feedback. I always try to leave a constructive note somewhere on the document.Leave room for creativity. I call this the “wow factor”. All of my rubrics have “going beyond expectations” as one of its criteria. This is especially important if you are a proponent of project-based learning. Students should not simply be asked to meet expectations. While that may be all they do, if they want the maximum points, they should need to push themselves to come up with an imaginative way to go beyond what is asked. This pushes them outside of their comfort zone and encourages creativity. This resourcefulness will undoubtedly help them later in their future workplace.
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2015 NCTE Education Policy Platform

2015 NCTE Education Policy Platform

Literacy is foundational to education, to work, and to civic life. As global and digital forces continue to shrink our world, the abilities to read and communicate are basic to individual opportunity and the social good. A failure to develop these abilities in every learner has consequences that reverberate at every level of society.

Two principles must guide all decisions affecting literacy education.

First, decisions must be informed by solid research, not merely by ideology or political expediency. More than a century of ongoing inquiry into how literacy best develops, including among diverse learners in varied situations, has identified effective teaching practices and the conditions that foster learning. Everyone involved in education-related decisions has a responsibility to attend to that research, and disciplinary organizations have a responsibility to provide it in ways that all can access.

Second, the needs and interests of all learners—early childhood through university—must guide our efforts.  Clearly, responsibility for meeting student needs and interests is complexly shared, by parents, teachers, schools, communities, and governments. We must not allow students to serve as proxy sites for contesting our economic, philosophical, and other differences.

We must provide conditions for literacy learning through the following four areas of action.

Capacity Building
As a society we share collective responsibility for building the capacity of all those involved in improving the conditions for literacy learning. Instead of pointing a finger and placing blame, our focus should be on creating informed and knowledgeable stakeholders who are responsible for optimal learning environments for all students, including legislators, school board members, administrators, teacher educators, teachers, and parents. For example, research makes clear that giving teachers time to collaborate builds their capacity for teaching. To build capacity for literacy learning, we recommend funding and flexibility in order to:

Provide teachers with the time and resources that are essential to creating collaborative, sustained opportunities for professional learning and building teacher inquiry and decision making.

Identify and promote strategies and experiences that will develop the leadership potentials of principals and teachers in literacy instruction.

Develop or implement innovative approaches for preservice and early-career teachers that incorporate sustained mentorships to connect academic and theoretical knowledge with practical application within diverse settings.

Develop the knowledge and strategies necessary for parents and communities to exercise informed decisions about children's education.

 

Equity in Education
Equity is essential to meet America's promise of equal opportunity for all citizens. Equity serves the common values of fairness, opportunity, and social good. Disparity in Iife circumstances should not result in a disparity of access to a quality education. With fifty-one percent of students attending public schools now eligible for free or reduced lunches, the growing wealth gap affects families across the United States as well as conditions and opportunities for learning. The federal government has a role to guarantee that all citizens are prepared to participate in a competitive knowledge economy and a strong democracy. The following actions are essential to ensure equity in our democracy:

Fund quality universal early childhood education; access to quality teaching and learning environments; and equitable support for all public schools.Use proven strategies to help students who are not making appropriate progress toward educational goals.Provide for the successful participation of students with the greatest needs, ensuring that Title I funding focuses on districts with the greatest percentage of students who lack economic opportunities, including the delivery of wrap-around services (such as before and after school programs, nutrition and health programs, and so on).Provide ongoing opportunities for comprehensive literacy education.

 

Comprehensive, Evidence-Based Literacy Education
A quality literacy education is a civil right and a public good that provides numerous benefits to individual students and to our society. All students deserve literacy teaching informed by the substantial body of credible research and exemplary practice. To that end, we support dedicated funding streams in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and/or the Higher Education Act HEA to:

Ensure comprehensive literacy education that builds upon the cultural and linguistic experiences students bring to school, integrates literacy instruction across the disciplines, promotes evidence-based approaches to the teaching of writing, and promotes the inclusion of diverse and multimedia texts.Make accessible educational technology that ensures all students have access to appropriate tools, to adequate bandwidth for accessing and creating resources, and to learning practices that make effective use of these technologies as they develop powerful multimedia literacies.Offer engaging, developmentally appropriate literacy education to all preschool learners, regardless of their geography or socioeconomic status. This includes access to schools or other literacy learning sites, to teachers knowledgeable about the needs and abilities of preschool learners, and to materials that facilitate learning.Enable professional development for all literacy educators, including teachers of all subjects and school principals, so that they understand characteristics of literacy development and literacy learners, are knowledgeable about effective curricula and pedagogies, share effective practices, and create strategies for addressing challenges as they arise.

 

Assessments for Learning and for Accountability
Assessment of learning, assessment for learning, and assessment as learning are essential to literacy education. Assessment should employ multiple measures, focus on growth, and be appropriate for specific learning situations. All stakeholders need to understand the assessments in use and respect the privacy of students and families while ensuring that educators have the information they need to make sound decisions in a timely manner. New and innovative forms of assessment may prove more valid and better able to contribute to student learning and school improvement than standardized tests. We recommend:

Funding research, professional learning, and teacher preparation to support formative assessment that enacts and informs instruction and that gives teachers, students, and parents information about progress toward literacy learning.Using standardized tests only to give leaders the yearly data about students' literacy learning they need to make evidence-based decisions to promote and hold themselves accountable for equity. Data must be disaggregated for all subgroups at the school, district, and state levels. Using testing only for the purposes and in the manner for which it has been proven valid. (For example, tests designed to measure school performance should not be used to evaluate individual teachers or their teacher preparation programs.) In addition, tests should be used in ways that minimize time away from instruction, employ sampling when possible, and offer appropriate accommodations to students with special needs without excluding them from challenging literacy learning opportunities.Funding research on assessments that have proven effective, such as portfolios, performance assessments, and competency-based models, and allowing flexibility for states and localities to implement them.Gathering multiple measures of college and university performance and progress in addition to completion rates; these measures include constant focus on essential learning outcomes and use of high-impact educational practice.
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