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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Graphic Novels & Comic Makers
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Comics | Make your own comic strips and cartoon characters | Bitstrips

Comics | Make your own comic strips and cartoon characters | Bitstrips | AdLit | Scoop.it
Bitstrips is your online funny pages. Turn yourself & your friends into cartoon characters, and create & share your own awesome comic strips!

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Viviene Tuckerman's curator insight, May 17, 2013 8:53 PM

Free version of bitstrips

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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Reading Specialists Resources - LiveBinder

Reading Specialists Resources - LiveBinder | AdLit | Scoop.it

A collection of resources for Reading Specialists on CCSS

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'Google Thursdays' and the Power of Self-Directed Learning

'Google Thursdays' and the Power of Self-Directed Learning | AdLit | Scoop.it
High school reading teacher Deidra Gammill describes what happened when she decided to put aside one class period a week and let students explore topics of their own interest.
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Culture Grams Kids Edition

Culture Grams Kids Edition | AdLit | Scoop.it
This video is an overview of the Kids Edition portion of Culture Grams
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Literacy Using Web 2.0
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A Great Guide to Developing Critical Thinking through Web Research Skills eBook

A Great Guide to Developing Critical Thinking through Web Research Skills eBook | AdLit | Scoop.it
July 9, 2014
Developing Critical Thinking through Web Research Skills is a free PDF eBook from Microsoft for teachers and educators.This short 37 pages ebook provides a wide range of ideas for...

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
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Instructional Strategies for Reading Improvement - webinar Nov. 14 - 4 pm (EST)

Instructional Strategies for Reading Improvement - webinar Nov. 14 - 4 pm (EST) | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Reading-, Literacy- and Pre-Learning Strategies that Impact
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The Learning Edge: Reading Strategies- The SQ3R.mov

Dr. John Body from the Office of Learning Skills at Mount Holyoke College gives an overview of a reading strategy that is an oldie but goodie- The SQ3R.

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Can we read with our ears? - Innovate My School

Can we read with our ears? - Innovate My School | AdLit | Scoop.it
Different students have different ways of learning, and this is absolutely true for literacy. Jules Daulby, whose wheelhouse includes SEN and English teaching, discusses how a certain amount of pupils are best learning with their ears...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 3, 7:08 AM

This post begins:

"In order to be an effective reader, two skills are required:

  • the ability to decode or make sense of letter / sound correspondences 
  • the ability to comprehend or understand the meaning of the text"

The post also provides access to an interview with Dr. Keith Stanovich who "argues that reading improves ‘crystallized intelligence’ and compares children who do not learn to read with those who do, by using ‘the Matthew Effect’ analogy."

The question remains, how do we help students whom do not read well, who have difficulty decoding text? We need to seriously consider the options, which include aural text (as in text that is read to students).

This issue is close to my heart. We want our students to be successful, yet we do not provide tools that are readily available to all who would benefit from them. This post looks at resources that are available in England for struggling readers. I will add a number of resources that are available in the US, and others may add resources for their countries in the comment section.

The question that each of us must answer is should we advocate for our students who are struggling with their reading skills to be able to use TTS (text-to-speech) programs that provide them with the ability to listen to the text and understand the text, without necessarily relying on their decoding skills? Do we give them the opportunity to level the playing field? By providing students with access to text that meets their learning style, we have given them the opportunity to be successful.

Today there are many free (or low cost) tools available that allow students to have text read to them. In the US two key players that help provide text to students (think books) with diagnosed reading disabilities are Bookshare, which provides free access to many books as well as TTS software and Learning Ally, which has many resources for students with dyslexia but may also require a membership fee. Additional sites to check out are Natural Voice Reader, which will read digitized text directly from a website and Rewordify, which will simplify the text.

Do you know free (or low cost) tools that help struggling readers? Please share them in the comment section.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
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Open Badges: Why and How

Open Badges: Why and How | AdLit | Scoop.it
Open Badges: Why and Why Not I have been wanting for so…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Linking Literacy: Digital, Media, Language, and Culture
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How do you Balance Digital vs Traditional Literacy Instruction?

How do you Balance Digital vs Traditional Literacy Instruction? | AdLit | Scoop.it
Traditional versus Digital Literacy How do you know what strategies are appropriate for teaching traditional literacy? Are the strategies different than those that promote digital literacy? We all ...

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Dean J. Fusto
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SLS Guernsey's curator insight, July 10, 10:08 AM

This makes interesting reading. I think that both are important in their own way so you really should be teaching both.

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An Introduction to Reading and Writing, Common Core Style! from Julie Duffield on Vimeo

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Middle School Media Lit and Critical Thinking
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Media Literacy Project Announces Bad Ad and Counter Ad Contests - PR Web (press release)

Media Literacy Project Announces Bad Ad and Counter Ad Contests PR Web (press release) Media Literacy Project is now accepting entries for their Bad Ad and Counter Ad Contests for 2014, which requires students in grades 6 to 12 to analyze print...


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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Middle School Media Lit and Critical Thinking
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5 Simple Questions To Encourage Student Voice | The Curious Creative

5 Simple Questions To Encourage Student Voice | The Curious Creative | AdLit | Scoop.it
This is a recent resource I have shared on Twitter that has proven really useful and very popular with educators. Thanks to Rebecca Alber and Edutopia for

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davidgibson's curator insight, April 26, 4:14 PM

Thanks to Rebecca Alber and Edutopia for a set of simple questions to get students thinking.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Transformational Teaching, Thinking, and Technology
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A 1:1 iPad Menu For Guided Reading - te@chthought

A 1:1 iPad Menu For Guided Reading - te@chthought | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Choice boards are powerful tools for providing students with both choice and direction in their work.

 

The idea, creatively shown below from teacher/blogger Monica Evon in the form of a menu, allows teachers to guide students towards certain forms of academic practice, or demonstration of specific standards. If, for example, you want students to show they understand how to calculate the area of a circle from real-life applications, you can create 8 different ways for them to show it."


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Elizabeth Dalton's curator insight, July 8, 8:14 AM

A great example of how digital learning can offer differentiation and guidance that can be flexible and still appropriate in general education for ALL kids.

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A Return to 'Balanced Literacy'?

A Return to 'Balanced Literacy'? | AdLit | Scoop.it
The new schools chancellor in New York City is advocating teachers use the once-mandated citywide but since questioned (discredited, by some accounts) approach to reading instruction known as "balanced literacy."
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Star Spangled Grammar: Celebrating America's spelling independence | Australian Writers' Centre

Star Spangled Grammar: Celebrating America's spelling independence | Australian Writers' Centre | AdLit | Scoop.it

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Lynda Dickson's curator insight, July 9, 11:51 PM

This is the best article I've seen on the subject.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Linking Literacy: Digital, Media, Language, and Culture
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Why grammar lessons should be renamed ‘understanding language’

Why grammar lessons should be renamed ‘understanding language’ | AdLit | Scoop.it
Jessica Brown: It’s an exciting time for grammar, according to the experts. But there’s a need for fresh thinking and the word itself can be misleading

Via Fiona Price, Dean J. Fusto
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Digital Technologies for Teachers and Career Practitioners
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Instructional Strategies Online - Think, Pair, Share

Instructional Strategies Online - Think, Pair, Share | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Dr Peter Carey
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Reading-, Literacy- and Pre-Learning Strategies that Impact
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This Insane New App Will Allow You To Read Novels In Under 90 Minutes | Elite Daily

This Insane New App Will Allow You To Read Novels In Under 90 Minutes | Elite Daily | AdLit | Scoop.it

The reading game is about to change forever. Boston-based software developer Spritz has been in "stealth mode" for three years, tinkering with their program and leasing it out to different ebooks, apps, and other platforms.


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Willemijn Schmitz's curator insight, March 8, 12:45 AM

Wow het werkt!

Theophilus's curator insight, March 8, 2:20 AM

Another insanely wasted exercise, illustrating an obsession with speed in a world that, as Set Godin puts is, "actually rewards you for being insightful and for doing work with meaning".

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Reading-, Literacy- and Pre-Learning Strategies that Impact
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Simply SWEET TEAching: Phonics vs. Whole Language: What Brain ...

Simply SWEET TEAching: Phonics vs. Whole Language: What Brain ... | AdLit | Scoop.it
Phonics," Donna Gardner states, "the whole language teaching method emphasizes "pre-reading strategies" because students who have not been taught phonemic awareness/ decoding skills (phonics) cannot sound out ...

Via Christine Els, Theophilus
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Christine Els's curator insight, March 14, 2013 6:42 PM

Supportive of phonic instruction. Additional sites with research based info.

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The Best List of Reading Response Questions Ever.

The Best List of Reading Response Questions Ever. | AdLit | Scoop.it
When I was in the classroom, I used the workshop model.  After students read silently every day, I asked that they write in their reading response journal for just five minutes.  They could choose ...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 5, 8:26 PM

Are you looking for an extensive list of reading response questions? Look no further. This post provides an in-depth list of questions, as well as suggestions on how the author used them in her classroom.

Along with a lengthy list of great questions there is also a section called Test Readiness Terms that provides additional questions in the areas of Analyze, Compare, Contrast, Define, Describe, Differentiate, Discuss, Evaluate, Explain, Identify, Interpret, List, Main Idea, and Outline.

Below are five randomly chosen questions.

— Describe the most important event. Give at least three reasons why you think it is the most important event.
— Draw an interpretation of the passage – may be a picture, symbols, graphic organizer.

— If you could change what you’re reading, how would you change it?

— Is the setting described well enough that can put a picture of it in your mind? Why or why not?

— What have you found boring about what you’ve been reading? What made it boring? If you were the author, what would you do to make it more interesting?

If you have students using writing journals it is worth your time to check out this list. You may not want to use all of the questions (the author notes that a printed list ran to 10 pages) so take the time to review and select ones that will work with your students.

Gary Harwell's curator insight, July 10, 9:38 PM

If yoiu are serius about reading, these are some great questions.

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How to Teach English Infographic | e-Learning Infographics

How to Teach English Infographic | e-Learning Infographics | AdLit | Scoop.it
The How to Teach English Infographic presents the methods ESL teachers have found more helpful while teaching English.

Via Diana Turner
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Literature & Psychology
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Franco Moretti and the Science of Literary Criticism

Franco Moretti and the Science of Literary Criticism | AdLit | Scoop.it
Should literary criticism be an art or a science? A surprising amount depends on the answer to that question.

 

Should literary criticism be an art or a science? A surprising amount depends on the answer to that question. If you’re an English major, what should you study: the idiosyncratic group of writers who happen to interest you (art), or literary history and theory (science)? If you’re an English professor, how should you spend your time: producing “readings” of the literary works that you care about (art), or looking for the patterns that shape whole literary forms or periods (science)? Faced with this question, most people try to split the difference: if you relate to criticism as an art, you take a few theory classes; if you relate to it as a science, you put on bravura close readings. . . .

 

Franco Moretti, a professor at Stanford, whose essay collection “Distant Reading” just won the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism, fascinates critics in large part because he does want to answer the question definitively.


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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Teacher Tools and Tips
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Essays on Poetic Theory : Learning Lab : The Poetry Foundation

Essays on Poetic Theory : Learning Lab : The Poetry Foundation | AdLit | Scoop.it
Learn how to read poems and poetry with the Learning Lab's annotated poems, discussion questions, poetics essays and teaching resources. Find new children's authors. Take a literature themed tour of Chicago or Washington DC.
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Sharrock's curator insight, July 8, 6:08 PM
A treasure trove for the ELA teacher exploring poetry with a class.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Middle School Media Lit and Critical Thinking
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A Taxonomy of Reflection: A Model for Critical ...

A Taxonomy of Reflection: A Model for Critical ... | AdLit | Scoop.it

How to create a community of learners. Reflective prompts for students, teacher and principals. Modeled on Bloom's approach to thinking.


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Writing Workshop Meets Critical Media Literacy: Using Magazines and Movies as Mentor Texts

Writing Workshop Meets Critical Media Literacy: Using Magazines and Movies as Mentor Texts | AdLit | Scoop.it
Access to this resource has been provided by the National Council of Teachers of English, an NCLE Stakeholder Organization. (RT @NCLE: Writing Workshop Meets Critical Media Literacy: Using Magazines and Movies as Mentor Texts.

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Shanahan on Literacy: Teaching My Daughters to Read -- Part II, Print Awareness

Shanahan on Literacy: Teaching My Daughters to Read -- Part II, Print Awareness | AdLit | Scoop.it
Teaching My Daughters to Read -- Part II, Print Awareness 

 

Last week, I began a multi-part series on how I taught my daughters to read. My oldest daughter wryly replied to that entry, suggesting I could have saved a lot of pixels if I had just said that I hired a tutor…. And her son who just had his third birthday (and who did not read that entry) informed me that his goal for being 3-years-old was to read words. In that first entry, I described the literacy context in which my daughters grew up. Now, let’s turn to the more formal side of the teaching. When the girls were 2-3 years old, more explicit teaching was introduced. Each child was encouraged to tell stories (often recounting personal experiences—I think this may have started with a family vacation). Essentially, these were language-experience approach stories. They would tell the story and I’d print them out in letters, two-lines high with plenty of space between words (initially on pieces of paper, and later in composition books—which they still have). I’d read the stories back to them, and they would choral read with me. Over time, they came to recognize some of the words in their stories. This was less direct teaching (I did not set out to teach particular words), but I was just responsive to what they were picking up. If they seemed to remember a particular word, I’d add it to an index card (yes, a flash card); if they forgot it at some point, that word would disappear from the pack. The point was to build a collection of words that they would recognize at sight. Like most children, they were fascinated by words like mommy, daddy, grandma, grandpa, as well as their names and their sister’s name. They each managed to develop a sight vocabulary of approximately 25 words—words they could recognize out of context—before they could actually read. This facet of what I did probably accomplished several goals beyond getting some written words into their memories: (1) it would have developed an understanding of print awareness (including directionality, the idea that letters are used to write words, the concept of word—the idea that words are separable);(2) it would have further sensitized them to the relationship between language and reading (since they saw language being recorded and read back); (3) it would have started to sensitize them to the idea of the permanence of literacy, that we could read back the words and that they didn’t change over time; (4) it may have provided them with some baseline insights into sound-symbol relationships (as I would repeat their words as I wrote them)—however, I don’t think it was particularly powerful in this regard and I did not stress that. Thus, we built an early base of both word knowledge and print awareness. Authorities argue over whether you should start with words or letters and sounds. My reading is that here is no convincing evidence on either side; research seems to show that both approaches work and that they do not need to be mutually exclusive. In our case, the whole time we were meeting the goals listed above, we were also explicitly teaching letters and sounds, and later spelling patterns. Thus, when they were telling these language experience stories, they were also memorizing their letters and learning the letter sounds. (The same thing is currently going on with my grandson. He is currently learning some words, but he already knows all of the letters—lower case and upper case, and the simple sounds that go with all or most of the consonants. He isn’t decoding yet, but he is gaining the raw materials needed to do that well). 
We did many language experience stories and this soon morphed into the kids doing their own writing--they could both "write" before they could read. But let me add one additional "print awareness" activity that we found beneficial. I have already described the extensive shared reading that we did with our girls. Remember, I was a young professor at the time, still learning lots about my craft. One day I was reading some research studies by Ferreiro & Teberosky. They described how the children they were studying had to learn that the words on the page told the story (the kids thought their parents made up the stories based on the pictures). I'd never noticed that confusion before--whether it had been there or not--but I brought this one home right away. That evening when I was reading to E., she put her hand on the page as young children do. Usually I would have just moved it away and kept reading, but this time I stopped in my tracks. "What's wrong?" she asked. "You've covered the words, so I can't read them." "You read that?" "Yes."  She was amazed and the rest of that reading was spent with her trying to interfere with it by anticipating where my eyes were going to be looking. Despite having the benefit of outstanding parents, she had no idea what to look at during reading before this. Not surprisingly, I introduced M. to this little game earlier than I had done with her sister.  Japanese scholars have long believed that when parents point at the text that they read to their children, that they are teaching important aspects of print awareness. You don't always have to print at what you read, but it is a good idea to do that some of the time. Next week I’ll get into the home decoding instruction more explicitly.

 

 

 

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