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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel

Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel | AdLit | Scoop.it
A story arc is the chain on which the pearls, or scenes, of your novel are strung. The story arc--or narrative arc--is the same thing as "plot."

Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, August 2, 2016 7:15 PM
Simply explained, this article is a great keeper to explain story arc. What it is, why it's important, and how to use it to make your novels pop with tension.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***


Sarah McElrath's curator insight, August 4, 2016 10:21 PM
Helpful way to understand and organize plot.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iMad about iPad
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How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It

How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It | AdLit | Scoop.it

Questions are the expressive, probing language for growing others; listening is the receptive, facilitating language for growing others. These two complementary approaches form a continuous growth conversation loop.

 

Leaders who are helping others to grow and innovate are always trying to craft the best questions to make a difference. Here's how to ask the questions that will propel your team and your organization forward.

 

Listening -- I mean listening really well -- is sometimes hard to do. Here's a great article by Kevin Cashman, author of The Pause Principle, reminding us that the more deeply and authentically we can listen to another, the deeper our questions go, and the deeper our understanding becomes.

 

Listening deeply is the first storytelling skill to build -- so you know which story to share or ask for. And then so you can dig more deeply into the story to understand what it really means.

 

For leaders, this is essential. For anyone wanting to master business storytelling, it is critical. Many marketing and branding folks have still not caught on to listening as being a vital component when using stories.

 

Sooooo -- here's a reminder that also contains some great insights, a list of what not to do, and a nice section on the power of authentic questions.

 

Now I'll go on a hunt and see if I can find an article for you just on the Art of the Question. For as they say in Appreciative Inquiry, the question is the intervention -- so knowing how to craft and ask the question is key.

 

In the meantime, enjoy this article.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz, molly mullee
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Writing Rightly
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The Writer’s Toolbox - Tips From the Masters - Gotham Writers Workshop

The Writer’s Toolbox - Tips From the Masters - Gotham Writers Workshop | AdLit | Scoop.it
The master of horror gives us some sage writing advice.

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Penelope's curator insight, June 28, 2016 3:18 PM
Let's go back about 200 years to another time and place. This writing advice (satire) is imagined from no other than the great master of horror, Edgar Allan Poe. These tips are otherworldly. I especially love #5. When in doubt? Bury someone alive. 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***