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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Four elements that every flash fiction story needs

Four elements that every flash fiction story needs | AdLit | Scoop.it
Sick of writing your novel yet? Learn to write great flash fiction and recharge your writing no matter what the length.

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Penelope's curator insight, August 2, 9:22 PM
What's so difficult about writing flash fiction (very short stories)? After all, there are less words. However painful it may be, like squeezing a size 18 body into a size 12 dress, nip and tuck at those words, but leave the heart of your story intact.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Writing Rightly
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Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com

Pixar’s 22 Golden Rules of Storytelling: TwisterSifter.com | AdLit | Scoop.it
In 2011, then Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats, tweeted 22 rules of storytelling. Artist Dino Ignacio then turned them into image macros.

Via Laura Brown, Lynnette Van Dyke, Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, July 21, 2016 11:36 AM
You may have already seen these rules of storytelling, but they are worth a refresher. Plus, now they've been married to some beautiful images from beloved Pixar films. My brain loves these visuals. Enjoy!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" *** 

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Writing Tips and Techniques
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Story Structure Diagrams « Ingrid's Notes

Story Structure Diagrams « Ingrid's Notes | AdLit | Scoop.it
Yes, it's true, I've had story structure on the brain. I've also recently joined pinterest (of which I immediately became addicted). But there's a happy side effect of these two obsessions… this post!

 

Holy Cow! Here's a blog post with 10 different diagrams on story structure! I doubt you will ever need another story structure diagram after looking at these.

 

Some are similar. Some have their own unique twist. And then there's the 17 stages of Joseph Campbell's Monomyth to explore. Yikes -- that's a big one!

 

Of course, the simplest story structure is: problem -- resolution. Add to that a set-up/context in the beginning and a meaningful close at the end, and you are done.

 

Hah -- would that storytelling could be so simple! As every professional storyteller will tell you, a powerful story is all in the delivery. Still, if you don't follow the structures in these diagrams, you will simply end up with a plot-based description: "I went to the store. I bought some bread. I came home." No story there! I doubt you would pay money for that one.

 

Soooo -- check out these diagrams, use them to craft your stories, and you are half-way there. Then go work on your delivery :)

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Elizabeth Rogers's curator insight, April 2, 2015 2:53 PM

TAKE A LOOK AT ALL THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF STORY STRUCTURE DIAGRAMS. WHICH LOOKS MOST LIKE THE ONE WE HAVE DONE IN CLASS?

Nathan Schultz's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:10 PM

A more humerous link, this article uses various funny graphics to explain the basics of plot, character arcs, four act structures, ect.  Interesting because it using a newer medium to better explain an old medium.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Writing Rightly
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Storyboard Your Novel And You'll Have A Roadmap

Storyboard Your Novel And You'll Have A Roadmap | AdLit | Scoop.it
Storyboard your novel and you'll have a road map for what happens next. Look closely at the beginning and end and follow Chekhov's advice to trim.

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Penelope's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:57 PM
A road map is a necessity for traveling long distances. You can also use a road map--called storyboarding--to plot your novel. 

The idea of storyboarding was developed at the Walt Disney Studio during the early 1930s. Disney credited animator Webb Smith with creating the idea of drawing scenes on separate sheets of paper and pinning them up on a bulletin board to tell a story in sequence, thus creating the first storyboard.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Writing Rightly
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The Writer’s Toolbox - Tips From the Masters - Gotham Writers Workshop

The Writer’s Toolbox - Tips From the Masters - Gotham Writers Workshop | AdLit | Scoop.it
The master of horror gives us some sage writing advice.

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Penelope's curator insight, June 28, 2016 3:18 PM
Let's go back about 200 years to another time and place. This writing advice (satire) is imagined from no other than the great master of horror, Edgar Allan Poe. These tips are otherworldly. I especially love #5. When in doubt? Bury someone alive. 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***