AdLit
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AdLit
Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Barbara Kingsolver: “everything we do becomes political: speaking up or not speaking up”

Barbara Kingsolver: “everything we do becomes political: speaking up or not speaking up” | AdLit | Scoop.it
"So many of us have stood up for the marginalized," explains writer Barbara Kingsolver in the wake of Trumplandia, "but never expected to be here ourselves," adding: It happened to us overnight, not for anything we did wrong but for what we know is right. Our first task is to stop shaming ourselves and claim…

Via Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 28, 2016 4:19 PM
Teaching is political action.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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The Dark Side of Collaboration

The Dark Side of Collaboration | AdLit | Scoop.it
Collaboration has been a buzzword of management gurus for the last 30 years. Countless articles have extolled the virtue of bringing together divers

Via Ron McIntyre, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, May 4, 2016 3:44 PM

Excellent discussion of a topic often ignored in businesses.  Well worth the read.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 5, 2016 10:06 AM
What we often think of as working together (collaborating) often leads to groupthink and minimal impact as creativity is negatively impacted. The word collaborate means to work with the enemy which suggests we give up our ideas for the sake of supposedly keeping the waters smooth. It leads to compliance and low morale. Strong leadership would seek out the dissenting voices and allow them to speak openly creating open dialogue. Listening to each other would become key.
Ian Berry's curator insight, May 8, 2016 2:37 AM
Having meeting free time the best piece of advice in this piece
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from critical reasoning
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4 Key Factors In Language Acquisition

4 Key Factors In Language Acquisition | AdLit | Scoop.it
4 Key Factors In Language Acquisition, including listening, self-direction, and translation/conversation balance.

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Transforming Teaching
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LessonWriter|Literacy-across-the-curriculum|Content-Area Reading|ELLs|TESOL|English Language Learners|Common Core Standards|Literacy|Reading|ESL|English as a Second Language|Adolescent Literacy|Adu...


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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Learning & Mind & Brain
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Reflection: A Tool for Assessment, Empowerment, and Self-Awareness

Reflection: A Tool for Assessment, Empowerment, and Self-Awareness | AdLit | Scoop.it
Through being reflective about your own teaching practices, model and guide students toward a more reflective approach to their projects, grades, actions, and reactions.

Via Amy Burns, Ivon Prefontaine, Dean J. Fusto, Elizabeth E Charles, Miloš Bajčetić
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 11, 2016 10:49 AM
As I interview teachers, the role of reflection is very important to their pedagogic practices. It takes on many different modes: writing, driving to and from work, listening purposefully, etc. It is not a one-size-fits-all.
Helen Teague's curator insight, May 22, 2016 12:21 PM
Schon rules!
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from critical reasoning
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Reading with Pictures: Serious Learning Through Comics

Reading with Pictures: Serious Learning Through Comics | AdLit | Scoop.it
I'm eight years old, reading the latest issues from Detective Comics. As much as I admire the pictures, I'm paying particular attention to the writing. I'm motivated to truly understand what's happen

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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Teaching and Assessing Writing
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How to teach writing, reading and thinking — Joanne Jacobs

How to teach writing, reading and thinking — Joanne Jacobs | AdLit | Scoop.it

How to teach writing, reading and thinking
OCTOBER 11, 2012 BY JOANNE LEAVE A COMMENT
“Explicit teaching of writing makes kids better writers” and readers. Does writing improve thinking? Dan Willingham looks at the evidence in The Atlantic.
Not all writing instruction is helpful, Willingham writes. Students learn to write well if they’re taught “the nuts and bolts,” such as “text structure, how to use specific strategies for planning, revising, or editing text, and so on. . . . if a teacher does not show students how to construct a paragraph or a well-written argument, some will figure out it anyway, but many will not.”
Writing instruction improves reading comprehension, but again the details matter. When students write about what they’ve read — analyzing, interpreting, summarizing and answering questions — they build comprehension, Willingham writes. Explicit teaching of writing conventions helps students understand how authors use conventions.
It’s worth noting that these two advantages — better writing and better reading — will probably not accrue if most writing assignments consist of answering short questions, writing in journals, and completing worksheets — exactly the writing tasks on which elementary school kids spend most of their time (Gilbert & Graham, 2010). Students need assignments that include writing in longer formats with some formal structural requirements.
The research is not as clear on the question of whether teaching writing improves thinking, he writes.
There is a certain logic to the idea that students can become better critical thinkers by completing writing assignments. Writing forces you to organize your thoughts. Writing encourages you to try different ideas and combinations of ideas. Writing encourages you to select your words carefully. Writing holds the promise (and the threat) of a permanent record of your thoughts, and thus offers the motivation to order them carefully. And indeed some forms of writing–persuasive or expository essays for example — explicitly call for carefully ordering thinking.


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