AdLit
9.1K views | +0 today
Follow
AdLit
Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Creative teaching and learning
Scoop.it!

Literacy and documenting learning | Tech Learning

Literacy and documenting learning | Tech Learning | AdLit | Scoop.it

"The point of an education is to become literate ( a person that is able to read, write and communicate their ideas) and become productive citizens of society. Let’s define documenting learning as a visible, interconnected, meta-cognitive approach for creating evidence of one’s own learning process (or the learning process of our students) ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Creative teaching and learning
Scoop.it!

Teaching with graphic novels | Edudemic

Teaching with graphic novels | Edudemic | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Modern graphic novels have emerged as effective teaching tools that help improve literacy, explain complex concepts, and get students excited about reading ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

We Are All Teachers Of Literacy via ‎@web20classroom

We Are All Teachers Of Literacy via ‎@web20classroom | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path
Scoop.it!

Using Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Across the Curriculum | OERE | Ontario Education Research Exchange

This summary was created by the Research for Teachers project at The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and can also be found on their website at: 
http://www.etfo.ca/resources/researchforteachers/Pages/default.aspx ;


Via Elizabeth E Charles
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from 21st Century Literacy and Learning
Scoop.it!

Stenhouse Publishers: Sharing the Blue Crayon

Stenhouse Publishers: Sharing the Blue Crayon | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Without self-control, persistence, and interpersonal skills, students struggle to learn to read and write. Sharing the Blue Crayon gives primary teachers a flexible, practical program that integrates social, emotional, and literacy learning throughout the school day and week, while bolstering classroom management ..."


Via Leona Ungerer, Les Howard
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

17 Writers On The Importance Of Reading

17 Writers On The Importance Of Reading | AdLit | Scoop.it
"Never trust anyone who has not brought a book with them." —Lemony Snicket

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 7, 2014 6:07 PM

7 November 2014

 

Oh what a delicious collection of quotes delivered to the mind's table with exquisite presentation.

 

These quotes are large enough to download and share with students. 

 

OR... to have students peruse in search of the single quote that most appeals to them.

 

A tip... tell the kids they can only pick ONE to call their favorite. Why? because it's easy to toss those without appeal. But extremely difficult to toss those with tremendous appeal. 

 

Just tell them the rules are they can ONLY pick one. Why? Because when forced to choose between two quotes (or maybe even three) they are forced into a sort of contemplative mode where they really have to weigh the reasons why both (or each) has such a strong appeal. 

 

And, in doing so, they will leave with an enhanced appreciation for all of the best ones. Rather than merely crossing out all but one and then not really exploring the source of any of the quote's attraction for them.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

"We appreciate your tax-deductible donations!"

Chéri Vausé's curator insight, November 10, 2014 6:08 PM

Reading is essential to writers, and not just for doing research. You can become hackneyed, in a rut, write in directionless formulas if you don't keep up and read someone else's style of prose. Authors, therefore, should read more than readers. Yes, that is exactly what I said. You will never grow as a writer if you don't read. As for reading junk, keep it to a minimum, for that could also keep you from reaching higher with your prose, from challenging you to writer better and better.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Can we read with our ears? - Innovate My School

Can we read with our ears? - Innovate My School | AdLit | Scoop.it
Different students have different ways of learning, and this is absolutely true for literacy. Jules Daulby, whose wheelhouse includes SEN and English teaching, discusses how a certain amount of pupils are best learning with their ears...

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 3, 2014 10:08 AM

This post begins:

"In order to be an effective reader, two skills are required:

  • the ability to decode or make sense of letter / sound correspondences 
  • the ability to comprehend or understand the meaning of the text"

The post also provides access to an interview with Dr. Keith Stanovich who "argues that reading improves ‘crystallized intelligence’ and compares children who do not learn to read with those who do, by using ‘the Matthew Effect’ analogy."

The question remains, how do we help students whom do not read well, who have difficulty decoding text? We need to seriously consider the options, which include aural text (as in text that is read to students).

This issue is close to my heart. We want our students to be successful, yet we do not provide tools that are readily available to all who would benefit from them. This post looks at resources that are available in England for struggling readers. I will add a number of resources that are available in the US, and others may add resources for their countries in the comment section.

The question that each of us must answer is should we advocate for our students who are struggling with their reading skills to be able to use TTS (text-to-speech) programs that provide them with the ability to listen to the text and understand the text, without necessarily relying on their decoding skills? Do we give them the opportunity to level the playing field? By providing students with access to text that meets their learning style, we have given them the opportunity to be successful.

Today there are many free (or low cost) tools available that allow students to have text read to them. In the US two key players that help provide text to students (think books) with diagnosed reading disabilities are Bookshare, which provides free access to many books as well as TTS software and Learning Ally, which has many resources for students with dyslexia but may also require a membership fee. Additional sites to check out are Natural Voice Reader, which will read digitized text directly from a website and Rewordify, which will simplify the text.

Do you know free (or low cost) tools that help struggling readers? Please share them in the comment section.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Boys and Reading
Scoop.it!

Enjoy A Book: Remedies for Reluctant Readers

Enjoy A Book: Remedies for Reluctant Readers | AdLit | Scoop.it

"A book review blog with a literacy lean. Contemporary young adult, middle-grade, nonfiction, literary fiction--there's something here for everyone!"


Via Heather Stapleton
more...
Heather Stapleton's curator insight, January 16, 2014 9:21 PM

Great posts on promoting reading, literacy, book reviews, readers advisory and more!

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, January 18, 2014 12:41 AM

I love reading yet I have grandchildren who don't enjoy it. And I know there are children and adults everywhere like that. So this blog might be of help. Also those wishing to improve their English and looking for books that will reward their effort.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Teacher Tools and Tips
Scoop.it!

How to Read a Poem- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More

How to Read a Poem- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More | AdLit | Scoop.it
Reproduced in partnership with the Great Books Foundation.

Reading poetry well is part attitude and part technique. Curiosity is a useful attitude, especially when it’s free of preconceived ideas about what poetry is or should be.

Via Sharrock
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Teacher Tools and Tips
Scoop.it!

Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual | Intervention Central

Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual | Intervention Central | AdLit | Scoop.it

Perhaps the most pressing challenge that schools face is that of ensuring that all children become competent readers. Young children who experience problems in reading quickly fall behind their more skilled classmates in their ability to decode and comprehend text. This gap in reading skills can emerge as early as first grade-and, once present, tends to be quite stable over time (Stanovich, 1986). First-grade teachers can predict with some confidence, for example, that those children in their classrooms with significant reading deficits by the end of the school year will very likely have continuing difficulties in reading in the fourth grade.

While the long-term negative impact of poor readers can be enormous, the good news is that schools can train their own students to deliver effective tutoring in reading to younger peers. Kids as Reading Helpers: A Peer Tutor Training Manual is a complete package for training peer reading tutors. Peer tutoring answers the nagging problem of delivering effective reading support to the many struggling young readers in our schools. Furthermore, peer tutoring programs can improve the reading skills of tutors as well as tutees (Ehly, 1986) and - in some studies-have been shown to build tutor's social skills as well (Garcia-Vazquez & Ehly, 1995). Young children tend to find the opportunity to read aloud to an older peer tutor to be quite reinforcing, adding a motivational component to this intervention.


Via Sharrock
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from college and career ready
Scoop.it!

The ABCs of Children's Literature

The ABCs of Children's Literature | AdLit | Scoop.it
A is for AMELIA BEDELIA

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 9, 2013 11:20 AM

And there's a reference to a different children's book for every letter!

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the official business name for GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

Elise Beeckman's curator insight, October 23, 2014 3:06 AM

Het is leuk dat die kindjes op zo een manier het alfabet kunt leren. 

Caroline Fogarty's curator insight, October 31, 2014 11:39 AM

I love this! So much nostalgia of my childhood.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Beyond the Book: Infographics of Students' Reading History

Beyond the Book: Infographics of Students' Reading History | AdLit | Scoop.it
I'm an evangelist.

A book evangelist, that is. I hand out books to students and colleagues, booktalking them in class, at lunch, and even in my email signature. I want my students to read widely and

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 20, 2013 8:43 PM

What would happen if you asked your students' to reflect on their reading history...and then have them create an infographic that helps them dig a bit deeper and share what they have learned? According to this teacher the finished product is pretty amazing!

She began with an article from the NYTimes "What's Your Reading History? Reflecting on the Self as Reader". Then she had students explore infographics and critique them as a group. The students then explored a number of websites that allow you to create infographics (and links are provided to them) and students chose one to work with. The post provides links to a number of infographics made by the students.

And the link to the article at the NYTimes is http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/03/04/whats-your-reading-history-reflecting-on-the-self-as-reader/?_r=0.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Creating a community of readers
Scoop.it!

Engaging Boys in Literacy

"Boys need a sense of purpose in order to engage with what they do. Give them an audience, create real ‘wow’ moments and help develop a love of fiction. Gary Wilson explores some practical ways in which you can help to engage boys."


Via Heather Stapleton, Sue Ward
more...
Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, March 1, 2013 12:02 PM

Boys love book club!  Teaching wilderness skills by reading Swiss Family Robinson!  

Alison Hewett's curator insight, April 6, 2013 6:33 PM

Tips to help boys

Heather Stapleton's curator insight, October 14, 2013 6:34 AM

New link for this video is https://global.oup.com/education/searchresults?search_input=engaging+boys+in+literacy++video+&region=international#

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Creative teaching and learning
Scoop.it!

How to use the text reduction strategy to improve reading comprehension -

How to use the text reduction strategy to improve reading comprehension - | AdLit | Scoop.it

How To Use The Text Reduction Strategy To Improve Reading Comprehension https://t.co/RKb6a7lKez #edchat #digln


Via Leona Ungerer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from E-learning
Scoop.it!

Invention Literacy Research – Part Two

Invention Literacy Research – Part Two | AdLit | Scoop.it

"This is the second post in a series describing the Invention Literacy Research Project that I worked on collaboratively with one of my English Teachers last school year- April Feranda. About 6 months ago, I watched this video by Jay Silver defining the term. I immediately loved this concept because it perfectly describes what I’ve been attempting to do in my library makerspace since May of 2013.  After writing lessons for Makey Makey last year, I realized I went through the ultimate training on Invention Literacy. I wanted to share that journey with you to help you become invention literate as an educator. April Feranda and I would love for your students to become invention literate. Therefore, we are putting this out there for you to hack and personalize and make your own. Read post one here. https://colleengraves.org/2016/06/07/invention-literacy-research-part-one/ "


Via John Evans, basil60
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Cool School Ideas
Scoop.it!

These 18 practices are proven effective for teaching reading

These 18 practices are proven effective for teaching reading | AdLit | Scoop.it
What works when you teach reading? These 18 teaching practices have been shown effective by reading researchers. Some are for beginning…

Via Cindy Riley Klages
more...
Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 16, 2016 10:12 AM
No disagreement from me, 1-18.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

10 New Ideas for Creating Literacy Centers - Daily Genius

10 New Ideas for Creating Literacy Centers - Daily Genius | AdLit | Scoop.it
Beth Holland brings us ten great ideas on creating literacy centers in classrooms

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Creative teaching and learning
Scoop.it!

Fifteen great audiobooks for helping kids read better ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Fifteen great audiobooks for helping kids read better ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | AdLit | Scoop.it

"The puzzling question that is often posed when talking about audiobooks' integration in the teaching and learning of literacy is whether they have the same cognitive benefits as the actual reading. In other words , can listening to audiobooks be considered reading? ..."

©

 

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Leona Ungerer
more...
Xuan Phan's curator insight, November 25, 2014 11:36 PM

Audiobooks is an amazing  learning tool for people of all ages, who enjoys reading or would like to improve their reading skills.

Craudio's curator insight, December 22, 2014 6:02 AM

Audiobooks in class room:

Introduce students to books above their reading levelModel good interpretive readingTeach critical listeningHighlight the humor in booksIntroduce new genres that students might not otherwise considerIntroduce new vocabulary or difficult proper names or localesSidestep unfamiliar dialects or accents, Old English, and old-fashioned literary stylesProvide a read-aloud modelProvide a bridge to important topics of discussion for parents and children who can listen together while commuting to sporting events, music lessons, or on vacationsRecapture "the essence and the delights of hearing stories beautifully told by extraordinarily talented storytellers" (Baskin & Harris, 1995, p. 376)

Audiobooks increase:

Reading comprehensionMotivationSelf-confidence
Mandy Reupsch's curator insight, December 8, 2015 9:54 PM

This is a great artifact that gives you ideas on how audiobooks can be of great use for students with reading disabilities.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

The future is in their hands: Using cell phones for literacy - Free book!

The future is in their hands: Using cell phones for literacy - Free book! | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Education Matters
Scoop.it!

A Handful of Great Apps for literacy Education

A Handful of Great Apps for literacy Education | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Roger Francis
more...
Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, May 1, 2014 9:17 AM

Can you have too many creative tools? Here are more!

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

Sweet Integrations

Sweet Integrations | AdLit | Scoop.it

"I used the Lit Trip Big Anthony: His Story so the students could visit the different places in Italy as Big Anthony struggled to find his Strega Nona. The students loved this activity. The students developed a more personal connection with the book."


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 14, 2014 8:08 PM

14 January 2014

 

It's always so nice to see blog posts that endorse the Google Lit Trips project, particularly when they include references  to the student engagement.

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is a legal business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Writing, Research, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions
Scoop.it!

The Gamification of Reading | ALSC Blog

The Gamification of Reading | ALSC Blog | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Stacey Edmonds, Be Learning, Sharrock
more...
Stacey Edmonds's curator insight, June 10, 2013 11:47 PM

We can be so creative and insprational now in how we provide learning to our children.  My son experiences the joys of Transmedia Storytelling when interacting with Ninjago, whether it be the cartoon, the games or his own world of Ninjago Lego.


It is hard as a parent to navigate between the whole 'Play Screen Time' v's 'Learning Screen Time' guidelines...especially when my son is also reading and writing words well above his offical 'grade' at school as he wants to create his own world in MineCraft, which means he needs to follow instructions and name his creations.


Actually, the insights in this article also takes me back to my early 20's when I was working with young men with learning difficulties and through the provision of computers they were motivated to read and write so they could search the 'world wide web' (what they were searching for was another matter!).


As Jennifer asks, If an app/game can inspire a child to read and become a lifelong reader, shouldn't we find ways to embrace the technology rather than condemn it?


See what you think!


Helen Teague's curator insight, October 19, 2013 8:44 PM

Transmedia Storytelling

BookChook's curator insight, October 20, 2013 6:57 PM

Interesting article with thought-provoking comments. I believe we need to be open to all sorts of media and opportunities with our kids, to help them find the reading that works for them. 

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from K-12 Research, Resources and Professional Learning Materials for English Language Arts
Scoop.it!

Literacy for Life | Fisher & Frey

Literacy for Life | Fisher & Frey | AdLit | Scoop.it

Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey have assembled a great collection of literacy resources, inlcuding tips for reading comprehension, writing, collaboration, and 21st century skills. This site includes links to powerpoint presentations and relevant research.


Via lori dolezal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from EdTech Tools
Scoop.it!

Teacher Toolkit | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies

Teacher Toolkit | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies | AdLit | Scoop.it
Teachers need both a repertoire of instructional strategies and resources for their Teacher Toolkit.

Via Patty Ball
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry | AdLit | Scoop.it

“Ten-year-old Annemarie Johansen and her best friend Ellen Rosen often think of life before the war. It's now 1943 and their life in Copenhagen is filled with school, food shortages, and the Nazi soldiers marching through town. When the Jews of Denmark are "relocated," Ellen moves in with the Johansens and pretends to be one of the family. Soon Annemarie is asked to go on a dangerous mission to save Ellen's life.”

~ Goodreads.com ~


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, May 17, 2013 7:26 PM

Google Lit Trips is proud to announce the publication of a brand new Lit Trip for Number the Stars by Lois Lowry.

 

This Google Lit Trip was developed by Steve Figurelli, a Staff Development Trainer for the Edison Township Public Schools in Edison, New Jersey.