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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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ALA releases 2014 State of America’s Libraries Report | News & Press Center

Libraries continue to transform to meet society’s changing needs, and more than 90 percent of the respondents in an independent national survey said that libraries are important to the community. But school libraries continue to feel the combined pressures of recession-driven financial tightening and federal neglect, according to the survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project, and school libraries in some districts and some states still face elimination or de-professionalization of their programs.These and other library trends of the past year are detailed in the American Library Association’s 2014 State of America’s Libraries report, released today during National Library Week, April 13– 19.
Sections of the report include: Libraries and Community Engagement, Public Libraries, Ebooks and Copyright Issues, School Libraries, Academic Libraries, Social Networking, Library Construction and Renovation, Outreach and Diversity, Washington Scene, and Intellectual Freedom including the list of “Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books” in 2013.

 

The full text of the 2014 State of America’s Libraries report is available at http://www.ala.org/news/state-americas-libraries-report-2014.


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, April 14, 6:25 AM

The importance of libraries highlighted for the community, but the challenges for school libraries are rife!

Lisa Norris's curator insight, April 20, 9:35 PM

Great library programs are energetic, flexible, and always researching and experiementing with innovative effective and efficient ways to meet the information needs of its patrons!

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, May 10, 5:27 PM

Just picked this up from Joyce Valenza. 

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20 Most Magnificent Places To Read Books

20 Most Magnificent Places To Read Books | AdLit | Scoop.it
Where you read will make your reading experience a lot different. If you love books and libraries, these great places to read books' what you can't miss.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, September 20, 2013 8:26 PM

Seeing these photos inspires me to retreat to my own library room and just read!!!!

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Boys & Reading

Boys & Reading | AdLit | Scoop.it

Do not train boys to learning by force and harshness, but lead them by what amuses them, so that they may better discover the bent of their minds. ~ Plato


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Platt Middle School's library using Nooks to get kids reading

Platt Middle School's library using Nooks to get kids reading | AdLit | Scoop.it

Platt Middle School's library using Nooks to get kids reading. "They're never out of books," he said.


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Guys Read Welcomes You

Guys Read Welcomes You | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Our goal is simple but ambitious — to help boys become self-motivated, lifelong readers."

 Best browsing of this site is via TEENS on the horizontal navigation bar.


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Boys & Reading

Boys & Reading | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Boys read. As librarians, we know that’s a fact. Research does indicate, however, that boys typically don’t read as much or as well as girls their same age, and as a result they can fall behind. Some great male writers, beloved by all readers, gave their perspectives on why getting more boys reading is necessary and how we might accomplish that goal..."

 

NB: This is an updated cross-post from Amy.  Original version:  http://showmelibrarian.blogspot.fr/2012/06/ala12-boys-and-reading.html


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Reading for pleasure 6 July 2012 conference notes

Reading for pleasure 6 July 2012 conference notes | AdLit | Scoop.it

"This full day conference for secondary school teachers and librarians explored strategies to engage young people with reading, putting books at the heart of learning."

 


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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming | AdLit | Scoop.it
A lecture explaining why using our imaginations, and providing for others to use theirs, is an obligation for all citizens

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:35 AM

How many stars would I give this article if I had stars to give based upon value to teachers of literature? Perhaps a galaxy minus three.

 

Why minus three? There are extremely rare points at which I might have divergent thoughts. But they are so few that in counting the stars in a galaxy, subtracting a few is absolutely insignificant.

 

A preface:

Some of the most cherished moments in my teaching career were those when a student would suddenly blurt out what was to him or her a profound realization stimulated by a passage in a book we were reading.  Quite frequently, that student would blurt out his or her comment with such a wonderful blend of intellectual discovery and emotional delight that he or she would immediately "realize" and become a bit embarrassed about the display of personal engagement that he or she had shared so publicly and with such unrestrained delight.

 

Though frequently the outburst brought an almost immediate moment of embarrassment to the student, it always brought such an adrenalin rush of joy to me that I'd immediately attempt to deflect the embarrassment and help that student return to the joy of the unprecedented discovery he or she had made "all by him or herself." It was good to be reminded that concepts I'd discovered so long before and were no longer the source of such elation to me, were NEW and FRESH and WONDERFULLY JOYFUL to students when they FIRST ENCOUNTERED those ideas. 

 

I might put my hand over my heart as though it was pounding so much that I had to pause to regain some control of my own excitement at their discovery. If I felt it was safe, I might just say softly as I dropped my eyes, "Wow. I need a moment. (pause) to just marinate in the beauty of what you just said." And, I'd actually just go silent long enough for the students to witness me just "appreciating" the moment. Within seconds the entire class, including those who might have laughed at the student for having "lost control in public" and those who might have rolled their eyes at the the student's comment as having somehow made them look bad or as having not been worthy of admiration since they may have already "figured that out," while witnessing my reaction came to wonder about the beauty of wonder and the joys that life's "special moments of personal discovery" bring.

 

Over the years, my response, though always absolutely sincere, did become a bit of a theatrical piece. enough drama to emphasize my appreciation for the gift of being able to witness the moment of beauty of one of my student's personal discoveries and not so dramatic as to amplify the student's embarassment for having "forgotten him or herself" in the moment.

 

I'll leave it there and simply explain that as I read this transcript from a talk given by Neil Gaiman I was that student overwhelmed on so many ocassions  by its articulate  capturing of so many "ah ha" moments. Sometimes the "ah has"  were a result of new ideas; increasingly rare for a veteran literature teacher. Sometimes they were a result of the absolute freshness of Gaiman's take on ideas I'd been quite aware of for decades. And in that freshness, new facets and contemplations flowed in torrents.

 

So without further comment, I just want to drop a few of the points made to give you a taste. These are  a few of the incredible number of gems that make this such a great read.

 

Consider these gems... (CAPS are mine for emphasis since bold is not available in this medium)

 

_______________

...I'm going to suggest that reading fiction, that reading for PLEASURE, is one of the most important things one can do...

_______________

...I was once in New York, and I listened to a talk about the building of private prisons – a huge growth industry in America. The prison industry needs to plan its future growth – how many cells are they going to need? How many prisoners are there going to be, 15 years from now? And they found they could predict it very easily, using a pretty simple algorithm, based on asking what percentage of 10 and 11-year-olds couldn't read. And certainly COULD'NT READ FOR PLEASURE... 

_______________

...Fiction has two uses. Firstly, it's a GATEWAY DRUG TO READING. The drive to know what happens next, to want to turn the page, the need to keep going, even if it's hard, because someone's in trouble and you have to know how it's all going to end ... that's a very real drive. And it forces you to learn new words, to think new thoughts, to keep going. To discover that READING per se IS PLEASURABLE.  ONCE YOU LEARN THAT, YOU"RE ON THE ROAD TO READING EVERYTHING... .

_______________

...There are no bad authors for children, that children like and want to read and seek out, because every child is different. They can find the stories they need to, and they bring themselves to stories. A hackneyed, worn-out idea ISN'T hackneyed and worn out TO THEM. This is the first time the child has encountered it. Do not discourage children from reading because you feel they are reading the wrong thing. 

_______________

... WELL-MEANING ADULTS CAN EASILY DESTROY A CHILD'S LOVE OF READING: stop them reading what they enjoy, or give them worthy-but-dull books that you like, the 21st-century equivalents of Victorian "improving" literature. You'll wind up with a generation convinced that reading is uncool and worse, unpleasant...

_______________

...I'd like to say a few words about escapism. I hear the term bandied about as if it's a bad thing. AS IF "escapist" fiction is a cheap opiate used by the muddled and the foolish and the deluded, and the only fiction that is worthy, for adults or for children, is mimetic fiction, mirroring THE WORST of the world the reader finds herself in. 

_______________

...If you perceive a library as a shelf of books, it may seem antiquated or outdated in a world in which most, but not all, books in print exist digitally. BUT that is to miss the point fundamentally...

 

So it is unfortunate that, round the world, we observe local authorities seizing the opportunity to close libraries as an easy way to save money, without realising that they are STEALING FROM THE FUTURE TO PAY FOR TODAY. They are closing the gates that should be open.... 

_______________

...One of the best cures for a reluctant reader, after all, is a tale they cannot stop themselves from reading...

_______________

...Albert Einstein was asked once how we could make our children intelligent. His reply was both simple and wise. "If you want your children to be intelligent," he said, "read them fairy tales...

_______________

 

Hoping that these quotes inspire a desire to read the transcript, I'll just leave it to you to find your own gems and areas for professional and personal introspection.

 

I'm convinced that you will find it time well spent.

 

You might even find yourself unabashedly blurting out some of your own personal and professional realizations at your next faculty meeting.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

Thierry Belleguic's curator insight, October 20, 2013 11:40 AM

A lecture explaining why using our imaginations, and providing for others to use theirs, is an obligation for all citizens. « 

It's important for people to tell you what side they are on and why, and whether they might be biased. A declaration of members' interests, of a sort. So, I am going to be talking to you about reading. I'm going to tell you that libraries are important. I'm going to suggest that reading fiction, that reading for pleasure, is one of the most important things one can do. I'm going to make an impassioned plea for people to understand what libraries and librarians are, and to preserve both of these things.

And I am biased, obviously and enormously: I'm an author, often an author of fiction. I write for children and for adults. For about 30 years I have been earning my living though my words, mostly by making things up and writing them down. It is obviously in my interest for people to read, for them to read fiction, for libraries and librarians to exist and help foster a love of reading and places in which reading can occur.

So I'm biased as a writer. But I am much, much more biased as a reader. And I am even more biased as a British citizen »

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A comic appeal to readers

A comic appeal to readers | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Schools turn to graphic novels to lure in those who may otherwise spurn books...

 Many teachers and librarians regard them as a serious literary form and say they're particularly appealing to boys who may not otherwise care to read."

 


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Inspiring Boys to Read for Life

Presentation for SWFLN on boys and literacy and how libraries can meet their needs and inspire boys to become readers for life.
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Librarian Booktalk with Carla Morris

Librarian Booktalk with Carla Morris | AdLit | Scoop.it
What do you say to teens or young readers to encourage them to read? ... What are some of the more recent books you recommend to young readers and why? ...
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Getting Guys to Read

Getting Guys to Read | AdLit | Scoop.it

"The Kent District Library is starting a new program called 'Guys Read'.

KDL Librarians say last year alone, boys checked out 256,000 fewer books than girls.

The 'Guys Read' program is in response to those numbers. The program is intended to get boys interested in reading. The goal is two fold. They want to make reading a masculine activity and to improve boys test scores."


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Boys Do Read

Boys Do Read | AdLit | Scoop.it

"The teen book publishing industry continues to gain momentum, but only a tiny fraction of teen books actually appeal to boys. With such a small selection to choose from, we are in danger of losing the boys Percy Jackson and Greg Heffley have made into readers. Rather than lamenting the inequality of the current publishing trends, we need to rethink teen collection development at our libraries." - from the about us page of Boys Do Read blog. 

Includes book reviews "with the intent on broadening the possibilities at what we can offer teen boys to read". (Steven)


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Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference - Library 2.0 - 3-5 Oct

Library 2.012 Worldwide Virtual Conference - Library 2.0 - 3-5 Oct | AdLit | Scoop.it
We are pleased to announce the Library 2.012 worldwide virtual conference, October 3 - 5, 2012.

 

The School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at San José State University is the founding conference sponsor.

 

Register as a member of this Library 2.0 network to be kept informed!  

 

The schedule of keynotes and sessions: http://www.library20.com/page/sessions-and-schedule

 

 


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