AdLit
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AdLit
Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Depth Psych
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Examining Our Shadows – The Symbolism of Monster Archetypes

Examining Our Shadows – The Symbolism of Monster Archetypes | AdLit | Scoop.it

Before we begin examining the monster archetypes, it’s important to realize that they don’t just represent a dark, malevolent side of us, but rather the part of our being that is least familiar to our conscious mind.

They become hostile only when it is ignored or misunderstood--expressing themselves through behavior that often sabotages our wishes or image of ourselves. But they serve us by nudging us toward the light. The important thing is that if you feel some resonance these or any other symbolic roles, you should examine what they represent to YOU. 

 

Let’s think of our inner monsters as our as unexplored power, bringing light to what is in shadow.... (click title for more)

 


Via Bonnie Bright
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Depth Psych
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What keeps you in the cave? Archetype of the Zombie

What keeps you in the cave? Archetype of the Zombie | AdLit | Scoop.it

The Zombie, which is only increasing its popularity in films, comic books, and classic novel mash-ups, is an image that hardly needs an introduction.  They are dead people returned from the grave, wandering around the land, and groaning after the living.  Side-stepping the gory details, the classic Zombie is easy to recognize:   Insatiable hunger, a monotonously numbing routine, and a lack of individual choice are three primary characteristics of this pattern.  Any act, from voracious spending to pursuing increasing amounts of attention, qualifies as long as what you gain is never enough.

 

This is not consuming for sustenance, but as a temporary fulfillment, stilling any discontent and numbing you to the... (click title for more)


Via Bonnie Bright
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Laura M. Smith's curator insight, November 1, 2013 5:24 PM

I have experienced zombies in my dreams. They often represent that part of me that is related to how I avoid feeling, how I avoid being in relationship. Mindless, numb, insatiable hunger for <insert your favorite flavor of human flesh>. It can represent a type of dissociation that maybe be prevalent as a version of bardo that keeps us from our higher selves and our connection to the Divine.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Depth Psych
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Jungian Archetype of the wolf - gods and godnesses, warriors and mothers, demons and outlaws, evil and uebermensch

Jungian Archetype of the wolf - gods and godnesses, warriors and mothers, demons and outlaws, evil and uebermensch | AdLit | Scoop.it

In a few weeks, there is Whitsun, and I will make one of my occasional trips to the monastery. The rock monastery St. George is a development center of the Benedictine  order in the Austrian Inn valley. The religious exercise will be lead by a Benedictine monk, who happens to have formal psychoanalytic credentials and introduced the theme ”The archetype of the wolf” for what to my understanding is a spiritual hiking weekend.

 

It became clear during my research, that in mythology, religion, in legends and fairy tales the wolf has played an outstanding ambiguous, dualist and multidimensional role. The wolf archetype is so  central,  that how the wolf is viewed , is a mindset indicator of human,  secular or spiritual organisations or of  the society we live in. But there is much  more.... (click title to keep reading)


Via Bonnie Bright
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