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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Keepin' Babel at Bay: 30 Incorrectly Used Words That Can Make You Look Horrible

Keepin' Babel at Bay: 30 Incorrectly Used Words That Can Make You Look Horrible | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, June 25, 12:30 PM

 

It's always nice to have a refresher on confusing words--especially if we long to be writers. This is our craft; let's learn it. Some mix ups are spotted so often as to be cringe inducing. More obscure words used incorrectly may be excused. Be forewarned: if you read this article, you are now an expert! :)

 

Some of the stumpers: affect and effect, compliment and complement, farther and further, insure and ensure, principal and principle.

 

One with absolutely no excuse? You're and your. Remember this; the contraction stands in for [you are]. Try them out in a sentence. See if it looks rights and makes sense. If you're still not sure? Google the word and find out the meaning!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://georg-grey.blogspot.mx/2014/05/30-incorrectly-used-words-that-can-make.html

 

Snapshotic's curator insight, June 26, 5:25 AM

I was taught that using the word "nice" was horrible...

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Who Versus Whom - Writing Rightly

Who Versus Whom - Writing Rightly | AdLit | Scoop.it

Get Grammar Girl's take on who versus whom.


Via Penelope
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Penelope's curator insight, September 24, 2013 8:09 PM

 

Who versus whom? Choosing the proper pronoun is a common conundrum for writers--at least it is for me.

 

First, a quick lesson on the difference between subjects and objects: You use "who" when you are referring to the subject of a clause and "whom" when you are referring to the object of a clause.

 

If that is too hard, Grammar Girl has given us a quick and dirty tip to pull out the proper pronoun. Like "whom," the pronoun "him" ends with "m." When you're trying to decide whether to use "who" or "whom," ask yourself if the answer to the question would be "he" or "him." If you can answer the question being asked with "him," then use "whom," and it's easy to remember because they both end with "m."

 

Example: Who (or whom) do I love? Answer: I love him.

 

But if you are trying to ask, "Who (or whom) passed the test?" the answer would be "He passed the test." There's no "m," so you know to use "who."

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/who-versus-whom?page=all

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Where Do Periods Go in Quotations?

Grammar Girl explains the differences between American and British rules of grammar. 


Via Dennis T OConnor, Bobby Dillard
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7 Sentences that Sound Crazy but are Still Grammatical

7 Sentences that Sound Crazy but are Still Grammatical | AdLit | Scoop.it
This Grammar Day, let's not look at grammar as a cold, harsh mistress. She can also be a fun, kooky aunt. Here are some tricks you can do to make crazy sounding sentences that are still grammatical.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, March 5, 2013 10:07 AM

You may find this amusing or of potential value as a piece of "informational reading" for your students.

 

WARNING: This may even challenge the pride that even the most serious grammar police might take in their expertise.

 

 

I have to admit that I have not been a big fan of most traditional approaches to dealing with the issues that grammar targets. The complicated vocabulary of grammar just amplified my annoyance regarding what I perceived in my disinterested early youth as completely unengaging complex explanations that seemed to have more exceptions anyway than value, had me locking doors to any potential receptiveness to the potential value of grammar rules. Being annoyed rather than receptive was not a wise reaction, but the purpose it served in permitting my distain to guide my reaction, completely trumped any perceived value in caring about grammar.

 

Later, but not much later, a few teachers took my attitude which was actually never even impolite, as a cue to imply that I was stupid. Perhaps that wasn't their intention, but in my unsophisticated comprehension, that's how I took their "encouragement." I wasn't actually stupid; I just didn't have a perceived reason to care. 

 

My appreciation for the rules of grammar did not take a radical change until I was a senior in high school. Though like many (partially) disengaged students, by that time I had learned to hide disengagement behind a minimal effort to learn just enough to not draw attention to my disinterest. My actual sense of the value of grammar itself hadn't changed much, but my sense of the value of pretending to be engaged in order to avoid negative attention had blossomed. 

 

But, something completely unanticipated changed all that. I fell madly in like with a girl who I had come to find out had a bit of a crush on me. So Plan A became, "Try to get in as many classes with S_____ during my senior year as possible." The problem being she was "smart." Very smart. Her crush on me had nothing to do with my intellectual curiousity. It was based entirely upon the fact that she found me "kind of cute" and very funny. 

 

The bottom line was, the only class where there was any chance of being in the same class with her was English! And, she'd already distinguished herself enough to be "invited" to take what was at that time the equivalent of an Advanced Placement course.

 

So I found myself, too clueless to consider the odds, making my case to Mr. Kay, the teacher, for letting me in the class in spite of my less than stellar previous performance record. He was well-known to be a cool teacher. And, I did like to read. So when he asked me why I wanted to be in the class. I emphasized how much I loved reading and how much my junior English teacher had begun to get through to me that grammar did actually have some value worth more consideration than I'd previously given it. 

 

Then Mr. Kay asked me if I was being forthright, a word I wasn't actually quite sure I ever had come across before.

 

I responded a bit more passionately than might have been expected, "Mr. Kay I've got to get into this class. I'll do every single assignment and work harder than I've ever worked before in an English class. I promise. Really. You can kick me out if I don't."

 

And he smiled, paused a moment and quietly said, "Okay, I'll hold you to that, but I've got one more question."

 

"Anything Mr. Kay!"

 

"So what's her name?" he grinned. He knew. 

 

"S________," I replied sheepishly. "But really, I meant it when I said I'd do every assignment and work hard. I wasn't lying about that. I just want you to know that."

 

"I'm convinced you will," he replied smiling.

 

I did. S________ and I wound up dating for a couple of years. S_______ gave me so many reasons to grow up intellectually.

 

And, Mr. Kay's well-deserved reputation as a cool teacher turned out to be based upon the simple fact that he made every one of his students feel as though he cared about them personally and I was one of those kids who just couldn't allow myself to let down anyone who cared about me as a person. 

 

She and Mr. Kay sort of double teamed me and seriously, by the end of my senior year, I had set my course on becoming an English teacher just like Mr. Kay. 

 

And that's how I came to care about grammar.

 

 

 

  ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

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10 Common Blog Writing Mistakes (Infographic)

10 Common Blog Writing Mistakes (Infographic) | AdLit | Scoop.it
Ever wondered what the most common grammar mistakes are that bloggers make? Run-on sentences, punctuation, or maybe use of wrong tenses? This infographic highlights common blog post writing errors and blogging facts.

Via Lauren Moss, R.Conrath, Ed.D.
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Nacho Vega's curator insight, April 2, 1:48 PM

Read it... or not... :)

JordiMarínba's curator insight, April 6, 3:37 PM

Excellent infografic to bear in mind when writing blogs.

MCLibrarianRMIT's curator insight, April 12, 10:12 PM

Common grammar errors and how to fix them.  Applicable to more than just blog posts.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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19 Jokes Only Grammar Nerds Will Understand

Q: What do you say when you are comforting a grammar nazi?

 

A: There, their, they're!


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 7, 2013 1:32 PM

WARNING: I doubt that you'll want to share these with your students... ...but know you'll enjoy a few of them. Particularly those that require a second look.  ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~"Google Lit Trips" is the official business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit  

Marika Charalambous's curator insight, September 8, 2013 12:18 AM

LOL this is hilarious (and so true!)

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Education tips - grammar and more!

Education tips - grammar and more! | AdLit | Scoop.it
Quick and Dirty Tips : Helping you do things better.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Most of What You Think You Know About Grammar is Wrong

Most of What You Think You Know About Grammar is Wrong | AdLit | Scoop.it
And ending sentences with a preposition is nothing worth worrying about

 

Where did these phony rules originate, and why do they persist?


Via Dennis T OConnor, Katie Frank
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