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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Google Docs Writing Journal - by @AliceKeeler

Google Docs Writing Journal - by @AliceKeeler | AdLit | Scoop.it
Use this Google Docs template to help students create a writing journal. Utilize heading features to make the doc accessible and to populate the outline.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Tony Guzman's curator insight, March 23, 3:37 PM
This article shares a template and tips on how to create a Writing Journal template within Google Docs for your class.
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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An Indispensable Google Scholar Tip for Teachers and Academics (automatic citation)

An Indispensable Google Scholar Tip for Teachers and Academics (automatic citation) | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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A Good Google Drive Tool to Enhance Students' Reading and Writing Skills - ( Read & Write )

A Good Google Drive Tool to Enhance Students' Reading and Writing Skills  - ( Read & Write ) | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Formative Assessment for Learning
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Quality Classroom Feedback and Google Apps

Quality Classroom Feedback and Google Apps | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Les Howard
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Technology in Art And Education
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Read&Write for Google for Struggling Readers & Writers

Read&Write for Google for Struggling Readers & Writers | AdLit | Scoop.it
Texthelp provides literacy software solutions for individuals, K-12 students, higher education students, and publishers.

Via Kathleen McClaskey, Pippa Davies @PippaDavies , Monica S Mcfeeters
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, September 24, 2013 4:56 PM

This might come in handy if you are in one of many schools around the country that doesn't have a reading specialist available to work with students.

nativemedia's comment, September 25, 2013 12:21 AM
fabulous
Cindy Medeiros's curator insight, October 5, 2014 2:22 PM

Free for teachers. Must use Google Chrome

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Great Books
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Video Storytelling Made Easy with the New Google Story Builder

Video Storytelling Made Easy with the New Google Story Builder | AdLit | Scoop.it
Collaboration has gone Google. Create a story and then share your video.

Via Robin Good, steve heye, Mark Gillingham
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Lino's curator insight, July 12, 2013 4:13 AM

Es una aplicación potente y muy fácil de usar que nos permite crear clips de vídeo reproduciendo una historia  con frases de texto que hayamos ideado entre dos o más personajes.

 

El video final se puede compartir directamente en Google+ o como un enlace para cualquier sitio que deseemos (por desgracia, no se muestra una vista previa o miniatura cuando se trata de compartir vídeo creado con StoryBuilder en Facebook).

 

Una gran herramienta.

 

De uso libre. (No tenemos que registrarte o iniciar sesión para acceder a ella).

 

Pruébalo: http://docsstorybuilder.appspot.com/

Richard Evans's curator insight, July 17, 2013 5:20 AM

Stories are a power communication strategy. 

N Kaspar's curator insight, August 11, 2013 6:08 AM

A tool to use for digital story telling.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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3 #Google #Chrome Apps for Leveled Reading (and much more!)

3 #Google #Chrome Apps for Leveled Reading (and much more!) | AdLit | Scoop.it
Chrome Apps for Leveled Reading
If you have followed this blog for very long, then you know that I am a self-professed Chrome Addict. I love it! I love the fact that I can customize it to fit my needs, but I love it even more because we can customize it t

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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The Golden Treasures of Google! - Part 1 (thanks @ShakeUpLearning)

The Golden Treasures of Google!  - Part 1 (thanks @ShakeUpLearning) | AdLit | Scoop.it
The fabulous tools you don't know about! Most of us know of the Googley Goodness of Google Drive and related apps for education, but did you know there is much, much more that Google offers for FREE! There are so many hidden gems for teachers and students

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Educational Discourse
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Advanced Google Search Tip: Sort by Reading Level

Advanced Google Search Tip: Sort by Reading Level | AdLit | Scoop.it
While presenting a series of Google trainings in Alaska last week, I discovered that very few participants knew how to do an advanced Google search by reading level. It's such a useful trick for differentiating reading materials in the classroom, I wanted to share it. Step 1: Enter your search

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Kelly Christopherson
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Toby Grosswald's curator insight, September 12, 2014 8:47 AM

Differentiating reading levels!

Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, September 12, 2014 11:42 PM

This is a great idea to share with all educators! 

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Tour Middle Earth With an Interactive Google Chrome Experiment

Tour Middle Earth With an Interactive Google Chrome Experiment | AdLit | Scoop.it
In the latest experiment from Google Chrome, the world from the Lord of the Rings books and movies is ripe for exploration.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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i-Docs's curator insight, November 25, 2013 9:02 AM

Latest experiment from Google Chrome lets you travel to middle earh with seamless horizontal scrolling...

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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The Well-Read Redhead: So how are those challenges going? *squirm*

The Well-Read Redhead: So how are those challenges going? *squirm* | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 5, 2013 11:51 AM

I've been doing a lot of reading about reading and have noticed an underlying theme. About half of those in the 18-24 year old range, who graduated from high school, including those who go on to college, stop choosing to engage in literary reading. And among those 18-24 year olds who graduated from high school and did not go on to any higher education the percentage of  those who pretty much stop choosing to engage in literary reading approaches 70%!

 

I've previously referenced this data collected by the National Endowment for the Arts 2008 report specifically addressing literary reading and, videos such as "Why Kids Don't Read What is Assigned in Class" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gokm9RUr4ME

 

It seems like we address literacy issue if students can't read or we teach literary reading primarily as a training ground for future English majors, assuming that a heavy emphasis upon practicing literary analysis is the logical next phase. Truth be told, I too spent the vast majority of my own career leaning heavily on deep reading as a valuable skill for college readiness. And, I took great pride whenever I discovered that a former student had been inspired to become an English major or even and English teacher as a result of some life changing pivotal experience he or she had had while exploring this or that piece of literature in my class. 

 

But I can't help but wonder about how many students, whose interest in reading fiction had never really taken root or had begun to fade in middle schoo, found themselves becoming more interested rather than less interested in personal reading as a result of the experiences they had in high school English classes. 

 

It's easy to excuse ourselves from revisitng the actual effectiveness of "allowing our students" to do a bit of personal reading in addition to the required reading or to attempt to make reading of the canon "fun" via various opportunities to do related projects, posters, book trailers, and other "more enjoyable" assignments. I did plenty of those as well. And, there's no doubt that interest and enthusiasm for doing those kinds of assignments is significantly higher than are the typical levels of engaged interest in doing traditional literary analysis essays. And I did plenty of those too.

 

Now don't get me wrong, I became an English teacher as a result of discovering, via a couple of exceptional English teachers, the treasures that great literature and deep analysis brought into my life. And, the value of forcing my brain to practice the articulate expression of my understandings via the strict attention to logic demanded by the robot essay, oops, I mean through the five paragraph essay structure.

 

But, I went into high school liking to read. I read mostly what my high school teachers told me was "junk," but I did like to read. Romeo and Juliet? Not so much, at least not until someone tuned me into the bawdy Nurse. And, I found the nurse's bawdiness not so interesting as I found Shakespeare's cleverness in phrasing those "naughty jokes." He could be almost as funny as Mad Magazine's Mort Drucker, Dave Berg, and Don Martin. The cleverness of Shakespeare's bawdiness was reminiscent of the intriguing edginess I'd discovered in Shel Silverstein and Charles Addams.

 

It's a delicate balance moving kids from a wide range of interest and disinterest in literary reading to a deeper personal engagement and appreciation for literary reading. The challenge is to develop or move forward their existing relationship with reading without killing it. It's dangerous to assume that those who do well in our classes because they do well on quizzes, essays, class discussion, and projects are the "good readers" and that those who don't are not. The difference is more about their personal engagement with and appreciation for reading. And truth be told, many of them find much of what is done in the name of promoting literary reading to be disengaging. I actually wonder how many pubescent 14 year old boys actually find all that romance in Romeo and Juliet interesting. And I wonder whether how well or how poorly those boys do on the associated quizzes, projects, class discussions, essays and project-based learning experiences is any real indication of whether they enjoyed or found real value in reading the play. Or, whether the quality of their effort had more to do with their interest in getting good grades whether they benefited from the story or not. 

 

I didn't get horrible grades, but I really didn't care much about getting good grades either. As a freshman and sophomore, I went through a phase of reading baseball stories both fiction and non fiction. I found myself in those days discovering a book called Fear Strikes Out by Jimmy Piersall. At the time, my understanding of his struggles with bipolar issues was thin at best. He was just a famous baseball player who was acting crazy. But, I was so engaged with that seemingly impossible combination that I couldn't put that book down. Whether I recognized it or not, I really enjoyed that book because I found myself caring deeply about whether Piersall would win his personal battle or not AND seeds of very valuable empathy for others who struggled with "normalcy" took root. And, that enjoyment based in my interest in baseball led me not too long thereafter to read books about Satchell Page and Jackie Robinson. They weren't in the canon, but they were about baseball and in learning more about the backside of the sport's history that I had had no previous idea about. More empathy. And because I'd begun to appreciate empathy, even though I had absolutely no interest in track and field in later years when history classes brought Jesse Owens and Babe Didrikson Zaharias came up in class, I found myself open to their stories not merely as great athletes but as major figures in the progress of race and gender history.

 

So what's this all have to do with this scooped article? Even more important than tending to the next crop of English majors is cultivating a next generation of young people who leave our care loving to read for the intrinsic value they have come to believe is the reward for life long reading. 

 

I've been hearing a lot about teachers integrating a version of Google's "20% Time" into their classrooms. For an excellent overview of this concept see my friend Lisa Thumann's overview here: http://thumannresources.com/2013/01/09/20-percent-time/ 

 

Some may think devoting a full day or period a week to a personal project is beyond doable and start with pilot program implementations such a "10% Time" where a full day or period every other week is tried. Others often have pilots that are more like units than full year or semester long committments. 

 

But this article posing personal reading as challenges to be selected or developed by the students themselves either as individual projects or perhaps as small group projects seems like a potential structure for giving students the opportunity to start from a personal interest that can be fed by reading and designed to lead to serendipitous deeper appreciation for reading beyond any initial anticipated rewards.

 

I'd suggest that we consider making life long literary reading our number 1 goal and development of future English majors and English teachers also a very important but perhaps a secondary goal.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

 

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Information Literacy - Education
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Search Literacy Lessons - Lesson Plans – Search Education – Google

Search Literacy Lessons - Lesson Plans – Search Education – Google | AdLit | Scoop.it

With more and more of the world's content online, it is critical that students understand how to effectively use web search to find quality sources appropriate to their task. We've created a series of lessons to help you guide your students to use search meaningfully in their schoolwork and beyond.


 


On this page, you'll find Search Literacy lessons and A Google A Day classroom challenges. Our search literacy lessons help you meet the new Common Core State Standards and are broken down based on level of expertise in search: Beginner, Intermediate, or Advanced.


Via Anthony Beal
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