AdLit
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AdLit
Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Creative teaching and learning
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Teaching with graphic novels | Edudemic

Teaching with graphic novels | Edudemic | AdLit | Scoop.it

"Modern graphic novels have emerged as effective teaching tools that help improve literacy, explain complex concepts, and get students excited about reading ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from UDL & ICT in education
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A Comprehensive Approach to RTI: Embedding Universal Design for Learning and Technology

Response to intervention (Rtl) provides tiered levels of supports to all students and allows for increasingly more inten- sive and individualized instruction. Similarly, universal design for learning (UDL) addresses needs of students by proactively plan- ning for instructional, environmental, and technology supports to allow all students to effectively access and engage in instruction. Although these two frameworks are widely accepted as structures for supporting students with diverse learning needs, the relation- ship between them has not been adequately developed. This arti- cle describes how an ecological Rtl framework that integrates scientifically based instructional strategies, proactive instruc- tional design, and purposeful technology use can provide a more seamless support system for all students.


Via Smaragda Papadopoulou
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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Adult Education Research: Where’s the Money?

Adult Education Research:  Where’s the Money? | AdLit | Scoop.it

Interestingly, major American foundations have contributed millions of dollars to innovative delivery platforms such as Coursera and Udacity. As a result, millions have enrolled in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), with an average class size of about 50,000. Yet, according to a recent study by Katy Jordon, less than 10 percent of learners complete current MOOC courses, and the majority of completion rates are in the two to eight percent range. Does this sound like effective adult education? No higher education institution would be able to attract applicants if it posted attrition rates of 92 to 98 percent.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 9, 2013 4:05 PM

Are MOOCs draining the foundation grant money pool leaving us without significant new research on adult learning?


How can we call a course with 98% attrition effective?