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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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Ten Great Tools for Telling Stories With Pictures - A PDF Handout

Ten Great Tools for Telling Stories With Pictures - A PDF Handout | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Rui Guimarães Lima
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Once Upon a Time - The power of digital storytelling

Slides to support an interactive webinar on digital storytelling for school leaders as part of the Ontario School and System Leaders EdTech Massive Open Online…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Ariana Amorim
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Sayed Saber Ali's curator insight, June 19, 2014 10:09 AM
Yes, I tried different tools like Voki and Tellagami and they were effective.
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What Fairy Tales Really Mean

What Fairy Tales Really Mean | AdLit | Scoop.it
It’s a literary rite of passage. You finally pick up a copy of the original, unabridged Grimm’s Fairy Tales. And you’re horrified.     Cinderella’s stepmother orders one daughter to cut o...

Via Sharrock
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Sharrock's curator insight, October 24, 2013 9:37 AM

Fairy tales are violent and inappropriate for our kids (at least the old versions are)--prove otherwise. You need to find the stories themselves to support these story summaries though. I don't know if we can easily find them online. The reference sources are included in the webpage though. Could make for an interesting discussion in faculty meetings. 

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What makes a hero? - Matthew Winkler

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-makes-a-hero-matthew-winkler What trials unite not only Harry Potter or Frodo Baggins but many of literature...

Via José Carlos, Debbie Northway
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Bad Spoon's curator insight, October 9, 2013 3:09 AM

Une magnifique vidéo présentant le Voyage du Héros, technique de Storytelling la plus efficace à ce jour

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Creatively Teaching: Arts Integration
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The future of storytelling: People want to befriend characters and influence their decisions

The future of storytelling: People want to befriend characters and influence their decisions | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Claudia M. Reder
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malek's curator insight, August 9, 2013 8:22 AM

Technology can make the ultimate fantasy come true: we live in the stories we watch on the screen. That will re-invent the way we think about brands.

Lindsay Wilson's curator insight, August 15, 2013 1:10 PM

How would you feel to listen to stories that interact with the GPS of your smartphone/tablet/computer to include appropriate sound cues and character introductions?

Sandrine Delage (Borgé)'s curator insight, August 17, 2013 2:00 AM

Bonjour,

 

L'article montre ici comment aller plus loin dans l'interaction et c'est sans doute un modèle inspirant pour l'engagement de followers sur les réseaux sociaux.

Tous les ingrédients sont présents : des personnages et une histoire qui nous accrochent et qui nous rappellent l'enfance qui n'est pas si loin, un dispositif d'interaction simple par le mobile, une prise en compte rapide du retour des utilisateurs.

Recette qui semble gagnante mais qui demande un contenu de valeur, une stratégie sans faille de l'organisation qui accompagne l'opération. Pas si simple !

 

Bonne semaine,

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Great Books
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Video Storytelling Made Easy with the New Google Story Builder

Video Storytelling Made Easy with the New Google Story Builder | AdLit | Scoop.it
Collaboration has gone Google. Create a story and then share your video.

Via Robin Good, steve heye, Mark Gillingham
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Lino's curator insight, July 12, 2013 4:13 AM

Es una aplicación potente y muy fácil de usar que nos permite crear clips de vídeo reproduciendo una historia  con frases de texto que hayamos ideado entre dos o más personajes.

 

El video final se puede compartir directamente en Google+ o como un enlace para cualquier sitio que deseemos (por desgracia, no se muestra una vista previa o miniatura cuando se trata de compartir vídeo creado con StoryBuilder en Facebook).

 

Una gran herramienta.

 

De uso libre. (No tenemos que registrarte o iniciar sesión para acceder a ella).

 

Pruébalo: http://docsstorybuilder.appspot.com/

Richard Evans's curator insight, July 17, 2013 5:20 AM

Stories are a power communication strategy. 

N Kaspar's curator insight, August 11, 2013 6:08 AM

A tool to use for digital story telling.

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Digital Storytelling: how to make an animated PPT movie

How-to video for creating digital storybooks using custom animations in PowerPoint. For more resources from Nancye Blair, visit www.EngagingEducation.net.

 

Wonderful resource!  


Via Baiba Svenca, Eva Buyuksimkesyan, EiriniKaragiorgaki, Let's Learn IT, Juergen Wagner, Louise Robinson-Lay, AnnC, Mary Perfitt-Nelson, Gust MEES, Glenda Gregory
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Maria Persson's curator insight, July 18, 2013 5:48 PM

All part and parcel of having your 'digital' voice heard.  Great tool.  

Allison Kenney's curator insight, October 16, 2014 8:46 AM

Not the same old PPT that we used to use.

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, October 20, 2014 3:24 AM

Je suis de plus en plus convaincu qu'il faut raconter des histoires, même à des 'grands'.

Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Readers Advisory For Secondary Schools
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Laser Lace Letters - 7 Tangible Steampunk Stories

"Seven Victorians had their silhouettes made at a little shop in London, and then, they vanished. What happened? The letters tell all. Laser Lace Letters is a series of tangible stories where you become a steampunk detective on the trail of a string of mysterious disappearances. At the heart of each story is a beautiful, laser cut cameo handmade in felt by artist Haley Moore."

This is a Kickstarter project which would be brilliant for storytelling, modelling and exploring the steampunk genre. Here's hoping it reaches it's target. Otherwise, perhaps it is an idea to emulate with kids.
Via Marita Thomson
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Tales From Comic-Con: The Future of Storytelling Techniques from Famed Genre Filmmakers

Tales From Comic-Con: The Future of Storytelling Techniques from Famed Genre Filmmakers | AdLit | Scoop.it

Karen Kemmerle:  "While the process of getting movies made and distributed is daunting, filmmakers and artists continue to seek new ways to hone their craft and build their audiences efficiently on (and off) the screen" ...


Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Katie Frank
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Transmedia for Social Documentaries

Transmedia for Social Documentaries | AdLit | Scoop.it
Angelica Das of the Center for Social Media shares some examples of pioneering work on the nonfiction side of transmedia.
Via Marita Thomson
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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How To Tell A Story—Right Now—From A Master Of Improv

How To Tell A Story—Right Now—From A Master Of Improv | AdLit | Scoop.it

Joe Berkowitz: "Upright Citizen Brigade founding member Matt Besser is one of the world’s leading improvers. Here, the off-the-cuff expert offers wisdom on how to free associate your way to solid spontaneous storytelling" ...


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5 Tips for Better Storytelling: A Jeff Gomez Recap by Ian Klein

5 Tips for Better Storytelling: A Jeff Gomez Recap by Ian Klein | AdLit | Scoop.it

Ian Klein: "At a recent conference on transmedia, or multiplatform storytelling, Starlight Runner Entertainment CEO Jeff Gomez said that stories help us commune with things greater than ourselves."


Via siobhan-o-flynn, The Digital Rocking Chair
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Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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Why Do Supervillains Fascinate Us? A Psychological Perspective

Why Do Supervillains Fascinate Us? A Psychological Perspective | AdLit | Scoop.it

Travis Langley: "Why are we fascinated by supervillains? Posing the question is much like asking why evil itself intrigues us, but there’s much more to our continued interest in supervillains than meets the eye."


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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Ten Sites and Apps to Inspire Creative Writing (@rbyrne)

Ten Sites and Apps to Inspire Creative Writing (@rbyrne) | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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MAKE BELIEFS COMIX! Online Educational Comic Generator for Kids of All Ages

Getting your kids into comic strips is easy. Just pick up a newspaper or visit a comic strip website likegocomics.com. Then, you can extend the educational value by helping them create a strip of their own. Some kids need only a blank piece of paper and pencil to churn out box after box. For those who need a prompt, you can enjoy the fun of creating one together. You’ll be surprised how easy it is. Try these ideas:

Draw a row of story boxes or print one from the Internet— try printablepaper.net. A few large boxes is best at first. Your child can work up to a grid when s»he’s ready for a longer sequence.Brainstorm with your young cartoonist. Will the characters be humans or animals? What emotions might they display—happiness, sadness, anger? Where does the story take place?Think about real-life situations to depict, such as a joke Dad told yesterday or a wacky thing that happened on the way to school. Move on to fantasy if your child wishes.You can either draw by hand or use a free online comic strip generator (like my site,makebeliefscomix.com). http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/parent-child/how-comic-strips-help-kids-learn-to-read-and-learn?utm_source=buffer&utm_campaign=Buffer&utm_content=bufferb0b31&utm_medium=linkedin#!


Via Sharrock
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SEVEN STEPS TO THE PERFECT STORY [Fun Infographic] Writing Rightly

SEVEN STEPS TO THE PERFECT STORY [Fun Infographic] Writing Rightly | AdLit | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Penelope
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KindredReaders's curator insight, January 2, 2014 11:45 AM

great visual reference!

Ali Anani's curator insight, January 3, 2014 1:39 AM

Creative writing in steps

Gennia Holder's curator insight, January 14, 2014 9:50 AM

This a great list, but, perfect?  I don't know about that :)  Stories aren't a magic bullet. However, applying these elements and telling the right story+right time+right audience... can make an emotional connection with your audience that impacts your business.

 

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StoryCorps

StoryCorps | AdLit | Scoop.it
Our mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share, and preserve the stories of our lives.

Via Amy Burns
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Amy Burns's curator insight, September 13, 2013 6:38 AM

Powerful, heartwarming, thought-provoking stories of us.

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Storytelling Websites and Resources | Elizabeth Figa

Storytelling Websites and Resources | Elizabeth Figa | AdLit | Scoop.it
Resources for storytelling performances, training, coaching, and research.

Via José Carlos, Jim Lerman
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Coletta P. Kahn's comment, July 26, 2013 12:13 AM
wow good one!!
Karen Dietz's comment, July 30, 2013 8:50 PM
Thanks Coletta!
Rescooped by Lynnette Van Dyke from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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TV's Novel Challenge: Literature on the Screen

TV's Novel Challenge: Literature on the Screen | AdLit | Scoop.it
The new series Parade's End is testing viewers' appetites for highbrow fare at a time when HBO and other networks are snapping up literary rights.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, February 23, 2013 9:08 AM

I don't know why the thought had never crossed my mind before. One of our favorite past times is to wait until a TV series with big buzz has released the most recent season's episodes on Netflix streaming and then we do a Boardwalk Empire marathon watching the entire series 5-6 episodes at a time over the course of 2-3 days. Though we're always a season behind, the advantages are many. There are no commericials, no worrying about whether or not our schedules clash with the "first run" viewing schedule (yes, we have DVR, though we don't have HBO or other premium stations), and best of all we don't have to wait a week to see the outcome of those "every-episode-has-a-cliff-hanger-ending" endings that have been perfected by the producers of these well-written series. I'm not a fan of TV cliff hanger endings, finding them generally an annoying practice designed not so much to create a "can't-put-it-down" forward momentum as they do in books, but to create some sort of week long addiction-widthdrawal like agitation between fixes. 

 

When chapters in a book end in a cliff-hanger, I want to know! immediately! and I keep reading. No one is withholding the next chapter for a week. Imagine if while reading you weren't allowed to read the next chapter after a cliff-hanging preceding chapter really ramped up your interest in the story's plot line. That's not exciting. It's aggravating. 

 

But, of course with a book, I've paid the full price ahead of time. It's mine. The publishing industry's business plan does not require that I subscribe to the story in order to generate ongoing income for the book's sponsors. The very purpose of cliff-hangers in books is to get us to NOT put the book down, while the same cliff-hangers between episodes of a telvision series are designed to create that addiction draw ensuring the sponsors that I'll be back next week to see their ads or to ensure HBO that I'll continue my Level-300 subscription.

 

It only works for me though because I've never really cared much for how up to date my contributions to "the next day's water cooler conversations"would be. What I've cared about was the depth and breadth and the ins and outs and... well, in the quality of a well-crafted story. You, know, like reading a book you just can't put down.

 

But, not being current at the cooler aside, the story telling in many of the more notable series and mini-series on the cable stations has become pretty darned incredible. And, telling stories that take 8-12 episodes provides a venue for depth and character and theme development that can create a rich experience similar to that of reading a well-written book. These stories become, like books, experiences deep enough to enjoy dwelling within for days.

 

Unlike their predecessors they are more than sophisticated nighttime soap operas because they are, or at least are perceived as, a single story with a continuous plotline and themes that weave themselves through a "longer story."

 

Sure, we each do need to decide where our current story telling comfort boundaries are since many of these series include language of concern and have significantly more graphic sexual or violent content than the traditional network offerings. I can't and don't particularly believe it is my place to impose my viewing or reading tastes upon other adults. I'm happy to share opinions, but because I don't happen to draw my line regarding tolerable violence-levels or other traditionally at-the-edge/over-the-edge" content where others do doesn't mean that my lesser-tolerance for extremely visual violence is "the rubric" by which other adults should determine their interest in a series' value. 

 

So, anyway, my point is that some extremely well-done story telling is happening in television land, much of which is truly competitive in quality to some of the best storytelling in print, paper-based or otherwise. And, now that there is an adequate audience for the well-written visual story teller, we see better and better writers, even many of our revered authors, turning towards that appreciative audience.

 

Is it all great? Of course not. But, the trajectory is clearly on an upward curve worthy of either reconsidering our views about TV drama or at least our keeping one ear tuned to the buzz lest we miss an opportunity to appreciate great story telling presented in a venue for which we may have not recently enough revisited our opinions.

 

Well, I began by directing my comments towards the downside of that forced break in the story as the broadcast scheduled series are released in weekly doses. I'm tuning in to the new paradigm being offered by NetFlix in its first series, Lilyhammer starring Steven van Zandt, famous to some for his role as Silvio Dante in The Sopranos and more famous to others as looooong-time guitar-playing band member alongside Bruce Springsteen all the way back to before the e-street band days.

 

Both Lilyhammer and Netflix's new House of Cards starring Kevin Spacey were released in a new "entire season all at once" paradigm. And viewing them in as small or large a bite as you wish, just as is the case when we read an enthralling book seriously closes the gap between chapter cliff-hangers' "can't put it down" enjoyment and episode cliff-hangers' "forced put it down" annoyance. 

 

I dunno... I love to read. I love to listen to great literature on my iPhone while doing the dreaded yardwork. I just love great story telling. And, there's some pretty great story telling going on out there right now.

 

No, it's not all great, but has it ever been all great or all trash for that matter in any story telling medium?

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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Lessons from the Future of StoryTelling summit

Lessons from the Future of StoryTelling summit | AdLit | Scoop.it

David Rowan: 'Delegates at the event, on 5 October, came from ad agencies and design shops, from the Punchdrunk theatre company and the Library of Congress -- all drawn by a shared curiosity about "reinventing the way stories are told"' ...


Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Sue Ward
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Six Patterns of Interactive Storytelling


Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Katie Frank
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Story Cove - A Safe Place to Read

Story Cove - A Safe Place to Read | AdLit | Scoop.it

Story Cove is a highly-acclaimed, award winning multimedia reading program based on folktales from the world's oral traditions. Children love Story Cove because the stories are entertaining and fun to read. Educators love Story Cove because students are engaged in reading and the products are easy to use. Librarians love Story Cove because the stories are authentic and richly illustrated. Parents love Story Cove because the stories model positive character traits and good decision making.

 

Read more:

http://www.storycove.com/

 


Via Gust MEES
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How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It

How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It | AdLit | Scoop.it

Questions are the expressive, probing language for growing others; listening is the receptive, facilitating language for growing others. These two complementary approaches form a continuous growth conversation loop.

 

Leaders who are helping others to grow and innovate are always trying to craft the best questions to make a difference. Here's how to ask the questions that will propel your team and your organization forward.

 

Listening -- I mean listening really well -- is sometimes hard to do. Here's a great article by Kevin Cashman, author of The Pause Principle, reminding us that the more deeply and authentically we can listen to another, the deeper our questions go, and the deeper our understanding becomes.

 

Listening deeply is the first storytelling skill to build -- so you know which story to share or ask for. And then so you can dig more deeply into the story to understand what it really means.

 

For leaders, this is essential. For anyone wanting to master business storytelling, it is critical. Many marketing and branding folks have still not caught on to listening as being a vital component when using stories.

 

Sooooo -- here's a reminder that also contains some great insights, a list of what not to do, and a nice section on the power of authentic questions.

 

Now I'll go on a hunt and see if I can find an article for you just on the Art of the Question. For as they say in Appreciative Inquiry, the question is the intervention -- so knowing how to craft and ask the question is key.

 

In the meantime, enjoy this article.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz, Luciana Viter, Claudia M. Reder
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Modern Mythology and the Transmedia Revolution

Modern Mythology and the Transmedia Revolution | AdLit | Scoop.it

Peter Usagi: " The Power of Myth was one of the most popular TV series in the history of public television. In a series of six hour-long episodes, American mythologist Joseph Campbell peeled back the layers of mystery that had once shrouded our species ancient storytelling traditions" ...


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Luciana Viter's comment, August 28, 2012 1:25 PM
Thanks for sharing!
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Why Do Supervillains Fascinate Us? A Psychological Perspective

Why Do Supervillains Fascinate Us? A Psychological Perspective | AdLit | Scoop.it

Travis Langley: "Why are we fascinated by supervillains? Posing the question is much like asking why evil itself intrigues us, but there’s much more to our continued interest in supervillains than meets the eye."


Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Lynnette Van Dyke
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