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Enabling the CCSS version of exemplary adolescent literacy.
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How to Use Foreshadowing - Helping Writers Become Authors - Writing Rightly

How to Use Foreshadowing - Helping Writers Become Authors - Writing Rightly | AdLit | Scoop.it
If we sift foreshadowing down to its simplest form, we could say it prepares readers for what will happen later in the story.

Via Penelope, Lynnette Van Dyke, Jim Lerman
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Penelope's curator insight, January 14, 12:35 AM

 

We hear lots about point of view, plot and climax, but what about foreshadowing? This very important element of a story seems to have been relegated to a back room and stuffed in the closet.

 

In its simplest form? It prepares readers for what will happen in the story. I'm sure you've read books where at the point of a major plot twist, you shake your head and say, huh? We all have. You feel cheated and want to snap that book shut!

 

There are two parts:

 

Part 1: The Plant    (Blantant or Subtle Hints)

Part 2: The Payoff (Important Scenes Play Out)

 

Foreshadowing can ease readers into what is going to happen. Sneak it in like pureed veggies, but don't hit readers over the head with it. This way, when you execute your plot twist, your readers will be delighted--not disgusted.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/2013/04/how-to-use-foreshadowing.html

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30 famous authors whose works were rejected (repeatedly, and sometimes rudely) by publishers

30 famous authors whose works were rejected (repeatedly, and sometimes rudely) by publishers | AdLit | Scoop.it

The revered sage Frank Sinatra once said, "The best revenge is massive success."


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Penelope's curator insight, October 7, 2013 7:03 PM

 

Have you ever felt the sting of rejection by publishers, family or friends? If so, you are in good company. Reading through some of these rude rejections experienced by 30 famous writers should give you the fortitude you need to keep on writing and publishing.

 

Famous authors such as:

 

George Orwell.  One publisher rejected Mr. Orwell's submission, Animal Farm, with these words:

 

It is impossible to sell animal stories in the USA. 

 

And this one about one of my favorite authors: John Grisham. Mr. Grisham’s first novel, A Time to Kill, was rejected by a dozen publishers and 16 agents before breaking into print and launching Mr. Grisham's best-selling career. 

 

Write on! 

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.examiner.com/article/30-famous-authors-whose-works-were-rejected-repeatedly-and-sometimes-rudely-by-publishers

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I Admit It: I’m An Abuser. Of Semicolons - Writing Rightly

I Admit It: I’m An Abuser. Of Semicolons - Writing Rightly | AdLit | Scoop.it

Actually only by the strictness of grammatical standards. I’m not a contrarion just because I want people to think I’m cool.


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Penelope's curator insight, June 19, 2013 5:19 PM

 

Semicolons are the bane of my existence, so I was thrilled to find this funny commentary on my nemesis.

 

I have to say I am more guilty more of abusing the em (--) dash. Perhaps I could replace a few of my em's with semi's for a change of pace!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://robonwriting.com/2013/06/17/i-admit-it-im-an-abuser-of-semicolons/

Cathy Ternent Dyer's curator insight, June 23, 2013 8:03 PM

Great article! The writer illustrates through his writing - and even states it within one of his paragraphs - that when you intentionally break a grammar rule for effect or added meaning, it's okay, justified even. However, FIRST you must have an understanding of all the rules: you gotta know you're breaking them! I often tell my students this same thing.

Penelope's comment, June 24, 2013 2:25 PM
Thanks, Cathy. Great tips from a teacher. Know thy rules; then break them! ;)
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The rise of eReading: Are books going to become an endangered species?

The rise of eReading: Are books going to become an endangered species? | AdLit | Scoop.it

With the breath of eReaders available and costs coming down what is happening in the print world? Are books becoming endangered? According to this infographic book should be with us for some time. The numbers of folks with eReaders is increasing, but many still like the "look and feel of a physical book." More information may be found in the infographic.


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SEVEN STEPS TO THE PERFECT STORY [Fun Infographic] Writing Rightly

SEVEN STEPS TO THE PERFECT STORY [Fun Infographic] Writing Rightly | AdLit | Scoop.it

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KindredReaders's curator insight, January 2, 11:45 AM

great visual reference!

Ali Anani's curator insight, January 3, 1:39 AM

Creative writing in steps

Gennia Holder's curator insight, January 14, 9:50 AM

This a great list, but, perfect?  I don't know about that :)  Stories aren't a magic bullet. However, applying these elements and telling the right story+right time+right audience... can make an emotional connection with your audience that impacts your business.

 

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Who Versus Whom - Writing Rightly

Who Versus Whom - Writing Rightly | AdLit | Scoop.it

Get Grammar Girl's take on who versus whom.


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Penelope's curator insight, September 24, 2013 11:09 PM

 

Who versus whom? Choosing the proper pronoun is a common conundrum for writers--at least it is for me.

 

First, a quick lesson on the difference between subjects and objects: You use "who" when you are referring to the subject of a clause and "whom" when you are referring to the object of a clause.

 

If that is too hard, Grammar Girl has given us a quick and dirty tip to pull out the proper pronoun. Like "whom," the pronoun "him" ends with "m." When you're trying to decide whether to use "who" or "whom," ask yourself if the answer to the question would be "he" or "him." If you can answer the question being asked with "him," then use "whom," and it's easy to remember because they both end with "m."

 

Example: Who (or whom) do I love? Answer: I love him.

 

But if you are trying to ask, "Who (or whom) passed the test?" the answer would be "He passed the test." There's no "m," so you know to use "who."

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/who-versus-whom?page=all

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5 Cases of Excessive Commas - Writing Rightly

5 Cases of Excessive Commas - Writing Rightly | AdLit | Scoop.it
The rules about commas can seem so complicated -- and contradictory -- that writers can (almost) be forgiven for tossing in an extra one or two. Here are several examples of overly generous deployment of commas.

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Penelope's curator insight, June 3, 2013 4:59 PM

 

To comma, or NOT to comma, that is the question, isn't it? ;)

 

If you are puzzling as to where to place a comma, then this is the article for you, or maybe not, or maybe you ought to just peruse the examples, and see if, sometimes, your commas are in the right place, or not.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.dailywritingtips.com/5-cases-of-excessive-commas/

Thomas Paul Mulrooney's curator insight, June 4, 2013 4:49 AM

I think I'm guilty of doing this from time to time, so this is a useful read.

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, June 4, 2013 6:17 PM

The important is not to fall COMMAtose ! or to be COMMAholic !