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News and innovation related to Additive Manufacturing applications and technology
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Was The Stratasys Selloff Overdone?

Was The Stratasys Selloff Overdone? | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
The Direct Digital Manufacturing and 3D printing sector remains hot with the strong results reported by Stratasys, Inc. (SSYS) Friday morning.

 

The huge selloff on Friday provides an interesting entry point for this stock, though it still trades at 30x very rough earnings estimates for the combined entity. Naturally any rejection of the merger would have significant impacts to the stock.

Anybody interested in the 3D printing sector should probably look into investing in 3D Systems instead. The company provides a cheaper entry into the sector without risking a market-moving event that could impact the stock price.

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Ceramic Printing – Design Lab Workshop

Ceramic Printing – Design Lab Workshop | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it

 

 

Peters developed the 3D-printed ceramic bricks after participating in a six-week residency program at the European Ceramic Work Centre. His research examined the process of creating “ceramics at the scale of architecture” while working with fixed limitations such as storage systems and the size of a desktop 3D printer. Peters investigated various applications for ceramic during his residency, including using it to create interlocking bricks and stackable honeycomb bricks.

 

He tested fabrication methods, specifically focusing on the uniformity of bricks printed multiple times and variations in relation to a specific form (such as a dome). The bricks were printed from a liquid slipcast earthenware recipe; the only necessary modification was a custom extrusion head, an easy addition for most printers, according to the designer.

For his next research project, Peters plans to explore other materials. “It doesn’t have to be necessarily ceramic,” he explains. “It could be concrete or cement or any mixture of building materials.”

 

http://designlabworkshop.com/introducing-building-bytes/

 

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Panda Robotics stops their Kickstarter campaign

Panda Robotics stops their Kickstarter campaign | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
Panda Robotics builds affordable, robust, and elegant 3D printers that are easy to use and consumer focused...

 

In the past weeks, we’ve received requests from institutions like universities, resellers, distributors and individuals who want to buy final PandaBots in bulk. This is wonderful, but we don’t want our Kickstarter backers, those who put their money on the line for us, to settle for a beta product so we can build a better product for all those who waited. Our wish is for our backers’ experience with Panda Robotics to be free from the inevitable concerns that arise from beta products. This will ensure you will be able to save your money and purchase the PandaBot when the final product is ready. To achieve these ends, we are in the process of seeking alternative forms of funding in order to manufacture and certify the production run.

It goes without saying that we are truly grateful to all our backers on Kickstarter. Thank you. It really is your belief in us and your support of our vision that makes us want to succeed. The last thing we want to do is to let you down. We will be providing to all of our backers a Panda Robotics t-shirt and a Panda Robotics sticker as a thank you for supporting us during our Kickstarter campaign, plus a $200 coupon that can be applied towards a PandaBot after we have gone through final certifications and can promise you a product you'll love and enjoy for a long time.

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Things ain’t what they used to be : Finantial Times

Things ain’t what they used to be : Finantial Times | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
Thing-o-Matic. It is, you’d have to admit, a pretty good name, writes Edwin Heathcote. It sounds like something Wile E. Coyote might attempt to clobber Road Runner with. Or perhaps some device from Dr Seuss.

 

The technology is also, now, beginning to have an impact on the final product. Young designers who have grown up with the technology are beginning to use it directly not just to prototype but to manufacture.

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One Just One: Unique 3D printed Jewelery

One Just One: Unique 3D printed Jewelery | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it

This Kikcstarter crowdfunded project aims at personalized jewelry items. They will be using generative design algorythms enabling their designers to create an unending range of designs based on genetic models that they create. They intend to select the best 1000 of each series and print only one out of  each.

 

This has alredy been done by my friend Lionel Dean at future factories, with his "Icon" collection.

 

Please visit his page at http://www.futurefactories.com/ to see the aplication of generative design in different products. Some of his works are also at FOC: http://www.freedomofcreation.com/shop/order.php?pid=1058

 

And here you can read (only Spanish) an interview from his visit to Fundación Prodintec: http://www.lne.es/gijon/2012/05/18/trabajo-creativo-siglo-xxi-traslada-masivo-software/1243508.html ;

 

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fabclay: robotic additive manufacturing processes

fabclay: robotic additive manufacturing processes | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
the digital fabrication system is a fully optimized, adaptive and human independent system that demonstrates a new vision in the process of architecture and construction.

 

I have to say that I have imagined this some four yearas ago, but I did not get funding to make it work

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ExOne President David Burns Provides Insight Into Additive Manufacturing

ME Media Editor-In-Chief interviews ExOne President David Burns during IMTS 2012 in Chicago. Burns shares his vision for where Additive Manufacturing is headed.
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Additive Manufacturing Takes Off in Aerospace

Additive Manufacturing Takes Off in Aerospace | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it

The researchers recently fabricated a laser-sintered, titanium-alloy prototype fuel collector for Austrian aircraft manufacturer Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH.

“Using laser sintering, we were able to reduce the number of components from five down to one,” said Gerhard Pramhas, managing director of FOTEC. “Along with that went a weight reduction of 77% as well. This was made possible through the unique manufacturing technique.”

 

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3D Printing: The end of the globalised supply chain?

3D Printing: The end of the globalised supply chain? | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
Supply Chains are governed by technology, which dictates the way we manufacture and distribute goods

 

The modern supply chain is all about globalisation. Shipping lines, freight forwarders and airlines depend on moving vast quantities of consumer goods on a daily basis, providing Western markets with items manufactured in the Far East.

According to industry experts, however, this could all be about to change. A potential threat to the logistics industry, 3D Printing has the ability to revolutionise production techniques, allowing the use of more automation and thus saving on cost.

 

In a White Paper recently released by the industry site Transport Intelligence, John Manners-Bell, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Transport Intelligence and Ken Lyon, CEO of Virtual Partners has created a projection of a potential future with 3D Printers at the centre, looking at how the logistics industry may be sidelined and how it could adapt to sit alongside this new technology.

 

The rise of 3D Printing is expected to cause a decline in the cargo industry, reducing the demand for long-distance transportation such as air, sea and rail freight industries.

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3D Systems Invests in NAMII

3D Systems Invests in NAMII | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
3D Systems Corporation (NYSE:DDD) announced today that it has taken the next step in its partnership with the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII), the federal initiative to enhance the competitiveness of U.S.

 

3D is making sure future users know best their machines as a way to sell both machines and materials in the future.

 

The cost: only two machines

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Reading Between the Layers of the Stratasys-Objet Merger

Reading Between the Layers of the Stratasys-Objet Merger | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
What does the merger of the 3D printer manufacturers mean for design engineers?

 

What does it mean for non-professionals, in terms of price?

 

What does it mean in terms of supply materials pricing for users?

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Formlabs - SLA from a kickstarter

Formlabs - SLA from a kickstarter | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
The Form 1 marries high-end stereolithography (SL) technology and a seamless user experience at a price affordable to the professional designer, engineer and maker.

 

FORM 1 was developed by three graduate students from MIT - Maxim Lobovsky, David Cranor, and Natan Linder.

 

This drastic cost reduction was achieved by replacing the costly laser system in the existing SL machines with a $10 laser developed by Sony for Blu-ray players.

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Imagine: 3D printing food from a start-up

Imagine: 3D printing food from a start-up | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
Essential Dynamics...

 

As from CNN money:

 

As part of a project at Cornell University, a group of scientists and students built a 3D printer and began testing it out with food. The device attaches to a computer, which works as the "brain" behind the technology.

 

It doesn't look like a traditional printer; it's more like an industrial fabrication machine. Users load up the printer's syringes with raw food -- anything with a liquid consistency, like soft chocolate, will work. The ingredient-filled syringes will then "print" icing on a cupcake. Or it'll print something more novel (i.e., terrifying) -- like domes of turkey on a cutting board.

 

This is the link to the delicious video

http://money.cnn.com/video/technology/2011/01/21/t_tt_3d_food_printer.cnnmoney/

 

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FORM 1, the affordable professional SLA printer beats Kickstarter records

An affordable, high-resolution 3D printer for professional creators. 

 

The Kickstarter campaign for the Form 1 stereolithography 3D printer beat all expectations. It ended with $2,945,885 in funding, almost 30x the goal of $100,000. It had $1M in funding in the first day, and before the end it broke the Kickstarter record formerly held be the Oculus Rift of $2.4M.

What make the Form 1 special is that it is the first laser-based 3D printer available at an affordable price. While most SLA  printers cost tens or hundreds of thousands, the Form 1 was offered for as little as $2299 for the first 25. It is aimed at (and price for) the professional market, but this price is still shockingly low compared to equivalent printers currently on the market.

It is designed to provide a complete 3D printing experience:

*    The Form 1 printer is engineered to produce high resolution parts with the touch of a button
*    Form software is intuitive and simple to use so you can spend less time setting up prints and more time designing
*    The Form Finish post-processing kit keeps your desktop organized so that you can easily put the finishing touches on your masterpiece.

 

The results are amazing: the Form 1 can print layers as thin as 25 microns (0.001 in) with features as small as 300 microns (0.012 in) in a build volume of 125 x 125 x 165 mm (4.9 x 4.9 x 6.5 in). This means you can print complex geometries with the exquisite details and beautiful surface finish that will make your creations stand out.

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Aerospace to advance with additive manufacturing technology

Aerospace to advance with additive manufacturing technology | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it

For Bruce Grey, Managing Director of the Advanced Manufacturing Cooperative Research Centre (AMCRC), Additive Manufacturing could see Australia becoming an attractive destination for international businesses. An initiative funded by the federal government, the Cooperative Research Centres actively support the development of new industrial technologies and play a vital role in driving Australian innovations into the global marketplace.

 

‘Additive manufacturing is an important area for developing future capability in Australian industry. And it meets the primary objective of the CRC – which is the delivery of new platform technologies across industry sectors including defence, aerospace, biomedical, fine chemical, mining, energy and fabricated metal products,’ says Mr Grey.

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Save the world from polygons!!!

Super simple, always watertight, 3D modeling mashup tool for meshes, designed for painless and direct 3D printing.

MeshUp is the first real volume modeler for meshes. We want to make life easier for 3D printing and for creators. At Uformia we envision a very different experience for users, where without effort, a creator can be sure that their models are always ready for 3D printing.

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Global Additive Manufacturing Market expected to be worth $3.5 Billion by 2017

According to a new report by MarketsandMarkets, the global market for Additive Manufacturing market is expected to grow from $1,843.2 million in 2012 to $3,471.9 million by 201, thanks to a compound annual growth rate of 13.5% from 2012 to 2017.


This report is mainly focusing on medical applications of additive manufacturing. Within the medical industry, additive manufacturing is used in making end-products such as surgical equipment, prosthetics & implants, and scaffolds. The market is growing due to the rising incidence of surgeries, coupled with increasing awareness and advances in technology. Surgical equipment accounts for the largest share in this market due to their wide applicability.
Europe accounts for the largest market share of the global additive manufacturing for medical devices market in 2012, followed by North America. However, adoption of novel additive manufacturing technologies in the medical field is gaining momentum at a fast pace in emerging nations due to growing educational and awareness efforts of industry players among physicians and patients. Moreover, increasing healthcare expenditure, growing income levels, low cost of manufacturing, rapid product development, growing surgical procedures in lieu with medical tourism, and lesser competition than mature countries, have amplified interest of market players in emerging markets, thus lowering Europe’s share in favour of the Asian and Latin American regions.


The study segments the market by Application (Medical Devices, Automotive, & Aerospace) and by Technology (3D Printing, Laser Sintering, Stereolithography, Fused Deposition Modeling, Electron Beam Melting, & Tissue Engineering), and identifies major market drivers, restraints, and opportunities in North America, Europe, Asia, and the rest of the world, specifically in additive manufacturing for the medical devices market over the period from 2012 to 2017.


New and improved technologies, financial support from governments, large application area, rapid product development at a low cost, and ease of development of custom products are the major drivers that are slated to propel this market. However, a few pivotal factors restraining the growth of this market are regulatory hurdles in different countries, material characterization during development, and process control and understanding.


The key players in this market are 3D Systems Corporation (U.S.), 3T RPD (U.K.), Arcam AB (Sweden), Biomedical Modeling, Inc. (U.S.), Envisiontec GmbH (Germany), EOS GmbH Electro Optical Systems (Germany), Fcubic AB (Sweden), GPI Prototype and Manufacturing Services, Inc. (U.S.), Greatbatch, Inc. (U.S.), Layerwise NV (Belgium), Limacorporate SPA (Italy), Materialise NV (Belgium), Medical Modeling, Inc. (U.S.), and others.

 

The price is US $ 4.650.


http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/additive-manufacturing-medical-devices-market-843.html

 

 

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December 4-5, 2012; NIST Roadmapping Workshop:Measurement Science for Metal-Based Additive Manufacturing | National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining

December 4-5, 2012; NIST Roadmapping Workshop:Measurement Science for Metal-Based Additive Manufacturing | National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it

Additive manufacturing (AM) is a high-priority technology growth area for U.S. manufacturers. Innovative additive manufacturing processes that fabricate parts layer-by-layer directly from the 3-D digital model have great potential for making high-value, complex, individually customized parts. However, key issues must be addressed to achieve widespread use of additive processes for direct part
production and realize the potential economic benefits. Among the issues to be addressed are gaps in measurement methods, performance metrics, and standards needed to evaluate fundamental AM process characteristics, improve the performance of AM equipment, improve the accuracy of AM parts, and increase the confidence in the mechanical properties of parts fabricated using these systems.

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3D printing is coming – so let's not strangle the industry at birth

3D printing is coming – so let's not strangle the industry at birth | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it

Now that we can download designs and turn them into objects, it's time for regulation to catch up.

 

3D printing exists and, without an appropriate policy framework, we run the risks of repeating mistakes in dealing with online copyright and file-sharing that are only just now being addressed a decade on. 3D printing faces similar challenges, but the stakes, potentially a significant proportion of the global manufacturing industry, are much higher. We need the state to be proactive in confronting the challenges and opportunities. Anything else risks missing out on some much needed growth.

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3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing) Is Turning the Impossible Into the Possible

3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing) Is Turning the Impossible Into the Possible | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
Whether you call it 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing, it is advancing quickly on a global level and offers something that up until recently was impossible: On-demand, anytime, anywhere, by anyone manufacturing.

 

Global view of the advances in implementing the technology as a game-changer factor

 

 

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Will 3D printers go home?

Will 3D printers go home? | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
Leslie Langnau of Make Parts Fast weighs in on the debate of home use of 3D printers.

"So my question is, if professional engineers are not rushing to buy the latest 3D printers in record numbers, why would the average person buy one? (Because it’s so cool, while true, is not an answer.)
I think the real issue with professional users is the lack of materials that simulate the specifications engineers’ need/want for their designs. And I think materials will inhibit home use as well, in terms of cost, availability, performance, and environment."

 

Short and rightful opinion from my point of view

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3D Systems Buys Rapidform |

Rapidform’s reverse engineering and inspection software empower product developers to deliver improved product quality and shorter time-to-market. By combining scan data processing, mesh optimization, auto surfacing and CAD modeling in a single, integrated tool, Rapidform has unlocked the power of 3D digitization for engineers and manufacturing professionals worldwide.

3D Systems expects Rapidform to contribute $15 million of revenue and deliver between $0.06 and $0.09 in earnings per share to its 2013 non-GAAP results.

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Automated Medical Implant Manufacturing Process Blends Technologies | EMDT - European Medical Device Technology

Automated Medical Implant Manufacturing Process Blends Technologies | EMDT - European Medical Device Technology | Additive Manufacturing News | Scoop.it
image of additive manufacturing project from EOS GmbH In a cooperative venture with additive manufacturing specialist EOS (Krailling, Germany), GF AgieCharmilles (Meyrin, Switzerland) unveiled a start-to-finish process for manufacturing titanium...

 

In a cooperative venture with additive manufacturing specialist EOS (Krailling, Germany), GF AgieCharmilles (Meyrin, Switzerland) unveiled a start-to-finish process for manufacturing titanium tibial trays for surgical knee implants at the recent IMTS exhibition in Chicago.

Starting with an FEA/CAD design, developed using WITHIN medical software, of a lightweight yet strong tibial tray, the component is automatically built from titanium powder using an EOSINT M 280 direct metal laser-sintering system. The part is produced layer by layer to form a near-net-shape piece. It then undergoes conventional machining, first on a Mikron HPM 450U 5-axis mill and then on a CUT 20P wire EDM machine, both from GF AgieCharmilles.

The part’s complex geometry combines variable pore sizes on one side to promote osseointegration with a smooth surface on the other side to support loads on the tibia.

 

Another entry: http://americanmachinist.com/machining-cutting/partners-demonstrate-start-finish-production

 

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Höganäs ventures into additive manufacturing by acquiring fcubic

Höganäs AB has exercised an option to acquire a 100 percent interest in fcubic AB of Gothenburg Sweden. Fcubic develops technology for additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, and consists mainly of a number of patents. This new business area will be branded as Digital Metal®. The closing of the acquisition is expected to occur on November 1, 2012.

 

With this acquisition Höganäs takes the first step into shaping the future market for additive manufacturing. The market potential is currently estimated at 1 billion USD, mainly within the fields of consumer design, medical, dental, aerospace and industrial. However, this industry is still at a very early stage in its life cycle, consequently making it difficult to quantify the true potential.

 

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