Addition AND Math for ELLs
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Flocabulary - Addition and Subtraction - Know About 10s

This educational hip-hop song teaches how to add and subtract from 10. See the lyrics and complete lesson at http://flocabulary.com/know-about-10s Flocabular...
Jamie Kanrich's insight:

Math for ELLs:

 

This hip-hop song rhymes and is an engaging way to teach children how to add and subtract numbers within 10. I think this is also useful for ELL students given it is a visual and auditory way for them to hear and view math. It also can be used for the teacher to help instruct her students. She can pause the video as needed according to the students' abilities. 

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Effectiveness – Use cases – ELL

Effectiveness – Use cases – ELL | Addition AND Math for ELLs | Scoop.it
DreamBox drives improved math proficiency for English Language Learners (ELLs). DreamBox Learning Math, the effective online adaptive math learning program.
Jamie Kanrich's insight:

Math for ELLs:

 

With an elementary education focus I have learned how important differentiated instruction is for my students. While it is hard for teachers to give individualized attention to students especially the ELL's who may need it most, the technology advances can support this problem. DreamBox Learning is "an adaptive learning program that responds to each student's unique needs, tracks progress, and incorporates best practices in ELL math instruction." I think this program can immenesely help my students achieve math proficiency. Furthermore, ELL's need to begin by exploring mathematical concepts with less language dependence to get accustomed to the math content itself and actually gain an understanding. Once they do, the program adheres to that student and adjusts the program as necessary. The lessons are visual and promote problem solving which is important in developing math concepts. 

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DIY Addition Game | Crafts for Kids | PBS Parents

DIY Addition Game | Crafts for Kids | PBS Parents | Addition AND Math for ELLs | Scoop.it
Make math more fun with this easy-to-make, frugal game! You can make it more difficult for older children by using higher numbers or doing speed rounds.
Jamie Kanrich's insight:

Addition:

 

This game provides such an interactive way to get students involved and doing math. Rather then doing worksheets or practing out of a text, this game is something I plan to incorporate with my class. It is great for both kinesthetic and visual learners and allows individual students or pairs of students to work together. I think this would also be a good center in my classroom. It is different than some of the math activities that are in our center now in which students often finish early and get bored.

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Math Instruction for English Language Learners | ELL Topics from A-Z | Colorín Colorado

Language plays an important part in math instruction, particularly for ELLs. This article offers some strategies for making language an integral part of math instruction and the tools and language ELLs need to master math.
Jamie Kanrich's insight:

Math for ELL's:

 

Following instructions, solving word problems, and understanding vocabulary correctly "require a language proficiency that sometimes exceeds our expectations." This is crucial when we instruct our ELL's. I know for me personally, having a class of mostly all ELL's, did pose a challenge for me. Despite popular belief, mathematical reasoning is closely related to language and it relies on a solid understanding of basic math vocabulary. This page offers strategies for teachers to help ELL's with math. For one, demonstrating that vocabulary can have multiple meanings, recognizing the differences between words, and how to use them correctly in a mathematical context are all important for a ELL's basic understanding of any math problem. How can one begin to solve it if they don't even understand the context of the written problem? Being familiar with the language is not enough; students need to have a thorough understanding of what the problem is specifically asking. Repeated readings of the word problem together as a class, hands-on activities with movement, drawing, daily practice of problem solving, and clear instruction on key vocabulary all help ELL's to eventually read and comprehend the text of the problem on their own. Sharing problem strategies, creating a "sentence frame" and posting it on the board, and having students translate symbols into words and write the sentence out will benefit ELL's. Relating it to their background knowledge is something I do now which I think enormously helps. Rephrasing math problems and putting it in simpler terms is also a good practice for ELL's. I plan to implement all of these strategies more during math instruction to help my ELL's grow.

 

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Math

Math | Addition AND Math for ELLs | Scoop.it
Dice Addition Worksheet
Jamie Kanrich's insight:

Addition:

 

My mentor actually did something similar to this In my placement and the students LOVED it! Each child was given 1 die and they were to roll it and write down the number it landed it on. Then, roll it again and write down that number. Students then added the two numbers and wrote down the sum. Students did this for many rounds and were excited how many different answers they got. They would say "I did 22 already!" They just wanted to keep rolling and adding.

I think this was a fun activity and proved to be engaging for them as well. Rather than just filling in a worksheet, students took part in a hands-on activity and the numbers were not given-- each roll was unknown which kept the activity unpredictble. Furthermore, it allows for independence given students roll different numbers; a student cannot just copy another student's answers. 

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First Grade Math Fun

First Grade Math Fun | Addition AND Math for ELLs | Scoop.it
Great hands on addition practice!
Jamie Kanrich's insight:

Addition:

 

This worksheet combined with using manipulative shape blocks provides a great way for students to practice adding. They can find all the addends that come to a certain number and continue with the others. Using the manipulative within a separate circle worksheet split in half allows the child to separate the two parts and figure out the whole.

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FirstGradeFaculty.com

FirstGradeFaculty.com | Addition AND Math for ELLs | Scoop.it
30 Addition and Subtraction Word Problems within 20 ~ For enrichment/extension, a bonus question is included with each problem. ($3)
Jamie Kanrich's insight:

Addition:

 

This worksheet is an example from a packet of ones like it for addition and subtraction. It is great for teaching children how to problem solve story problems and using the different tools to solve. Once students learn the multiple ways to solve math problems, they can utilize what they have learned through these worksheets. Having students pick at least two methods to show and check their work allows them to use whichever ones they find most efficient for him or her. Then discussing why they chose the methods they did to solve a problem really engages them through their thought process. It also serves as a great way for me to check children's understanding. Each worksheet also includes a bonus which acts as an extension piece for my higher level students. It aligns perfectly with the Common Core State Standards and fills the 1.OA.A.1 standard. 

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Math

Math | Addition AND Math for ELLs | Scoop.it
Number talk - One student calls out an answer while other erases the problem. You could play this same game with number bonds to 20. Can be multiplication or division bonds/models.
Jamie Kanrich's insight:

Addition:

 

I think this game is a really fun and engaging way for students to practice math facts. It is essential that children know how to add and eventually reach the point where they instatntly know the solution. Rather than reviewing flash cards or giving addition problems every day for a warm up, this is an effective tool that will certainly engage my young learners. It is also beneficial because they have to recognize the numbers and link it to what answer was called out. This is significant factor in their development of oral language and mathematics sight word identification.

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Teaching and Tapas: How To Use a Math Word Wall

Teaching and Tapas: How To Use a Math Word Wall | Addition AND Math for ELLs | Scoop.it
Jamie Kanrich's insight:

Math for ELL's:

 

Posting math vocabulary on the word wall is a great idea which I have not thought of. Since word walls can get overcrowded very quickly and hard to find a certain word, I like the idea she offers on having a special spot near her teaching area where she posts the new words she will be introducing that day. She then puts them on on the word wall once students comprehend them and she is ready to introduce some new words. I think this will significantly help not only my ELLs but my whole class. It keeps mathematical concepts organized and more focused. Incorporating them in a lesson is also important as it shows students how the words are used and gives them the opportunity to practice them. Then giving praise when they use them correctly is something they will all strive for and try to use the words. This is especially important for ELL's as it will help them become more comfortable with the English language. My favorite idea is putting a tab in each student's math notebook for vocabulary. Each student has their own visual dictionary of words including a definition she gives them to paste in their notebooks. They are then required to create their own illustration or example of the definition. I think this is an exemplary idea because seeing a drawing or example of the definition really helps learners grasp the concept- most especially for ELL's. I think this is something students of all age can practice as well. Throughout my education I created outlines with math concepts I needed to remember and then a drawing/writing as an example. This certainly helped me develop my understanding and gain a clearer comprehension of the concept. This is also a good visual representaion for visual learners. Another method in helping students with their math vocabulary is doing a "Guess the Word" activity at the end of a unit. Saying, "I am thinking of word that means..." and so forth provides an engaging and fun way for students to learn the math vocabulary. It is also useful for auditory learners. 

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