Acupuncture and the urinary system
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Acupuncture in the treatment of renal colic. [J Urol. 1992] - PubMed - NCBI

Acupuncture in the treatment of renal colic. [J Urol. 1992] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

J Urol. 1992 Jan;147(1):16-8.Acupuncture in the treatment of renal colic.Lee YH1, Lee WC, Chen MT, Huang JK, Chung C, Chang LS.Author information Abstract

A prospective randomized study was performed to compare the effect of acupuncture and intramuscular Avafortan injection in the treatment of renal colic. Our results showed that acupuncture is as effective in relieving renal colic as Avafortan but it had a more rapid analgesic onset (3.14 +/- 2.88 minutes versus 15.44 +/- 7.55 minutes, p less than 0.05). Of the patients in the Avafortan group 7 (43.8%) had side effects, including skin rash in 3, tachycardia in 2, drowsiness in 1 and facial flush in 1. No side effects were noted in the acupuncture group. During 2 hours of observation acupuncture and Avafortan seemed to be ineffective in promoting stone passage. However, patients receiving Avafortan treatment were more likely to have paralytic ileus. In summary, acupuncture can be a good alternative for the treatment of renal colic.

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Acupuncture Controls Overactive Bladder

Acupuncture Controls Overactive Bladder | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it
Acupuncture restrains urination for overactive bladder patients in this new study.

 

on 01 July 2014.

 

Researchers have discovered that acupuncture is effective for controlling overactive bladder syndrome. The research team, a combination of Whipps Cross University Hospital and University College of London Hospital investigators, document that 79% of patients in the study showed clinically significant improvements. The researchers conclude that acupuncture is an effective treatment modality for patients with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) and “is well tolerated with no side effects or complications.” As a result, the research team notes that acupuncture “should be considered as a potential alternative to our current therapeutic regimes” for patients with OAB.

Overactive bladder syndrome is a dysfunction of the bladder’s storage abilities that lead to a sudden urge to urinate. Symptoms include a sudden urge to urinate that is often difficult to control, involuntary loss of urine (urge incontinence), frequent urination (greater than 8 times per day) and waking at night 2 or more times to urinate (nocturia). Etiology varies and may include dysfunction of the kidneys, bladder nerve signals and muscle activity. Contributing and exacerbating factors of OAB include multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson’s disease, increased fluid intake, kidney and bladder organic disorders, diabetes, pharmaceutical medications and illicit drugs, urinary infections, enlarged prostate and increased consumption of caffeinated beverages.

The researchers note that acupuncture is safe and effective. All patients in the study had already tried conventional approaches to care: behavioral modifications and pharmaceutical medications including anticholinergics and beta agonists. Although surgical procedures are often part of conventional treatment regimes of care for OAB sufferers, all candidates were pre-surgical. The research team notes, “The aim of the study is to assess if acupuncture is effective in the treatment of patients with OAB in whom conservative measures and oral medications have failed, but are unwilling or unsuitable for invasive therapies.” 

This study focused on three acupuncture points. This protocolized approach is common in scientific investigations and varies from standard clinical practice in which customization of the acupuncture point prescription is applied for specific diagnostic considerations. Despite the limitations of a standardized set of acupuncture points across all patients in the study, 79% of all patients showed significant clinical improvements. In a real-life situation, a licensed acupuncturist has the ability to adjust the protocol to meet the specific individual needs of the patients. As a result, a licensed acupuncturist can potentially exceed the success rate achieved in this protocolized approach to care. 

Acupuncture was applied at a rate of once per week for a total of 10 weeks. Each acupuncture treatment session was 30 minutes in length. Acupuncture points SP6, CV4 (RN4) and KI3 were applied. SP6 and KI3 were needled bilaterally on the lower leg and ankle. CV4 (RN4) was needled on the midline and is depicted in the image at top of the article. The researchers note that the study began with the use of traditional manual acupuncture and later electroacupuncture was applied to the needles. Urodynamic studies and evaluations confirm that this regime of care is both safe and effective for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome.

The researchers note that acupuncture has several benefits. It can be used for patients who cannot tolerate medications, acupuncture does not cause the adverse effects associated with OAB medications, acupuncture demonstrated efficacy where medications and behavioral therapy failed and acupuncture may avert the need for surgery as a corrective measure. Acupuncture provides an effective option to patients who have tried medications without success. In this way, acupuncture can potentially reduce the number of patients requiring surgery for OAB.

References:
Post-treatment, Pre-treatment, and ICIQ-UI Short Form. "ACUPUNCTURE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF OVERACTIVE BLADDER SYNDROME." 2014.

Philp T, Shah PJR, Worth PHL. Acupuncture in the treatment of bladder instability. British Journal of Urology 1988 Jun: 61(6); 490-493.

- See more at: http://www.healthcmi.com/Acupuncture-Continuing-Education-News/1337-acupuncture-controls-overactive-bladder#sthash.J3xfL0MK.dpuf

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Acupuncture with electrical stimulation may treat muscle atrophy caused by kidney disease

Acupuncture with electrical stimulation may treat muscle atrophy caused by kidney disease | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it
Acupuncture may help treat muscle wasting that can occur as a result of kidney and other diseases, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The technique may be an attractive non-drug strategy that could help many patients.
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Acupuncture for symptom management in hemodialysis patients: a prospective, observational pilot study. [J Altern Complement Med. 2011] - PubMed - NCBI

Acupuncture for symptom management in hemodialysis patients: a prospective, observational pilot study. [J Altern Complement Med. 2011] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

J Altern Complement Med. 2011 Aug;17(8):741-8. doi: 10.1089/acm.2010.0206. Epub 2011 Jul 1.Acupuncture for symptom management in hemodialysis patients: a prospective, observational pilot study.Kim KH1, Kim TH, Kang JW, Sul JU, Lee MS, Kim JI, Shin MS, Jung SY, Kim AR, Kang KW, Choi SM.Author information AbstractOBJECTIVES:

Patients undergoing hemodialysis suffer from a variety of complications related to end-stage renal disease. This prospective, observational pilot study aims to determine the feasibility, safety, and possible benefits of acupuncture for symptom management in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

METHODS:

Twenty-four (24) patients undergoing hemodialysis received acupuncture treatment for their symptoms. Manually stimulated, individualized acupuncture treatments were provided twice a week for 6 consecutive weeks on a nondialysis day or on the day of hemodialysis prior to initiating treatment. Symptoms were evaluated using the Measure Your Medical Outcome Profiles 2 questionnaire, and quality of life was measured by Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form (KDQOL-SF(™)) Version 1.3 at baseline, 7 weeks and 11 weeks from baseline. Statistical analysis was conducted on the basis of the intention-to-treat principle.

RESULTS:

Twenty-one (21) patients (87%) completed the whole treatment course and follow-up evaluation. Three (3) patients dropped out due to increased fatigue (n = 1), pancreatic and renal transplantation (n = 1), and infections of the arteriovenous fistula used for hemodialysis access (n = 1). Patients experienced a significant improvement of symptoms considered the most bothersome, reporting a decrease of 1.87 and 2.08 points on a 0-6 symptom scale at 7 weeks and 11 weeks, respectively (both p < 0.0001). Some subscales of KDQOL-SF(™) showed significant improvement at 7 weeks (effects of kidney disease, burden of kidney disease, role-limitations physical, emotional well-being, and energy/fatigue) and 11 weeks (physical functioning and energy/fatigue). No serious adverse events related to acupuncture occurred.

CONCLUSIONS:

Acupuncture seems feasible and safe for symptom management in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Future controlled trials are needed to confirm the benefits of acupuncture.

PMID: 21721925 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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A prospective, randomized pilot trial of acupuncture of the kidney-bladder distinct meridian for lower urinary tract symptoms [J Urol. 2003] - PubMed - NCBI

A prospective, randomized pilot trial of acupuncture of the kidney-bladder distinct meridian for lower urinary tract symptoms [J Urol. 2003] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

J Urol. 2003 Mar;169(3):1037-9.A prospective, randomized pilot trial of acupuncture of the kidney-bladder distinct meridian for lower urinary tract symptoms.Johnstone PA1, Bloom TL, Niemtzow RC, Crain D, Riffenburgh RH, Amling CL.Author information AbstractPURPOSE:

We performed a pilot trial to assess the response of lower urinary tract symptoms and prostate specific antigen (PSA) to acupuncture in a population of patients biopsy negative for prostate cancer.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A total of 30 patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 study groups, including observation for 3 months with 6 blood samples for PSA at set intervals, 9 sessions of acupuncture in 3 months to points of the kidney-bladder distinct meridian expected to treat the prostate with 6 blood samples for PSA at set intervals and 9 sessions of acupuncture in 3 months to points not expected to treat the prostate with 6 blood samples for PSA at set intervals. The effect of acupuncture on lower urinary tract symptoms was assessed monthly using the International Prostate Symptom Score.

RESULTS:

Trend analysis (repeated measures ANOVA) revealed no significant changes in the 3-month period in the randomized arms. Statistical analysis showed p = 0.063 for the International Prostate Symptom Score, p = 0.945 for PSA and p = 0.37 for the free-to-total PSA ratio.

CONCLUSIONS:

Acupuncture to the kidney-bladder distinct meridian neither relieves lower urinary tract symptoms nor impacts PSA.

PMID: 12576840 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

 

 

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Electroacupuncture improves voiding function in patients with neurogenic urinary retention secondary to cauda equina injury: results from a prospective observational study -- Liu et al. 29 (3): 188...

Electroacupuncture improves voiding function in patients with neurogenic urinary retention secondary to cauda equina injury: results from a prospective observational study -- Liu et al. 29 (3): 188... | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

Acupunct Med 2011;29:188-192 doi:10.1136/aim.2010.003913

Original papersElectroacupuncture improves voiding function in patients with neurogenic urinary retention secondary to cauda equina injury: results from a prospective observational studyZhishun Liu1, Kehua Zhou1,2, Yang Wang1, Yanxia Pan1,3

+Author Affiliations

1Department of Acupuncture, Guang An Men Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China2Department of Physical Therapy, Daemen College, Amherst, NewYork, USA3Graduate School of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, ChinaCorrespondence toDr Zhishun Liu, Department of Acupuncture, Guang An Men Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China; liuzhishun@yahoo.com.cnAccepted 7 March 2011Published Online First 12 April 2011Abstract

Objective To report the therapeutic effectiveness and feasibility of electroacupuncture (EA) treatment in patients with urinary retention which is caused by cauda equina injury and refractory to conventional conservative treatments.

Methods From 9 August 2007 to 10 May 2010 prospective evaluation was carried out in 15 patients with neurogenic urinary retention secondary to cauda equina injury who underwent EA treatment at bilateral points BL32, BL33 and BL35. All patients received five sessions of EA treatment each week for the first 4 weeks, three sessions a week for the following 2 weeks, and then were followed up for 6 months. Voiding abilities, postvoiding residual urine volume (RUV) and maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) were documented as outcome measures.

Results After 6 weeks' EA treatment, 10/15 enrolled patients regained their self-voiding ability, and the mean postvoiding RUV for all patients decreased by 303.6±148.8 ml. In nine patients with documented data, Qmax increased by 11.0±6.3 ml/s. In nine patients, voiding difficulties changed from severe to mild. At the end of 6 months' follow-up, 8/10 patients retained their regained self-voiding ability, whereas two patients had lost their voiding ability again.

Conclusion The results indicate that the EA treatment may have longlasting therapeutic effectiveness in the management of neurogenic urinary retention secondary to cauda equina injury.

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Acupuncture appears to reduce symptoms in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (n=12)

Acupuncture appears to reduce symptoms in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (n=12) | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it
Acupuncture Bedford's insight:

Full article on page 113.  The result of this study are encouraging, the researchers state.

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Conclusion, The Overactive Bladder Evaluation and Management, Informa Healthcare

Conclusion, The Overactive Bladder Evaluation and Management, Informa Healthcare | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

Acupuncture for treatment ofoveractive bladderBook: Chapter 23 The Overactive Bladder Evaluation and Management, First EditionMary P FitzGeraldPublishedJuly 2007eBook ISBN9780203931622ISBN9781841846309EditionFirstPages438Size7 1/2 x 9 3/4 inFormatHardcover128 illustrationsOnline ChapterChapter PDF (231 KB)Chapter PDF Plus (232 KB)ReprintsPermissions Chapter Opening

For many of us, it is difficult to believe that one might place acupuncture needles at favored locations on the body wall and expect to bring about meaningful improvements in bladder symptoms. Nonetheless, acupuncture has been used for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms for about 5000 years. This chapter will provide an overview of acupuncture therapy and of some evidence supporting the opinion that acupuncture can be an effective OAB treatment.

KeywordsOveractive bladder, Incontinence, Urinany infection, UTI, Catheter, Andrology, Male sexual health, Urinary tract, Nephrology, Bladder, Kidney, Urolithiasis, Stone disease, Calculi, Erectile dysfunction, Neurogenic bladder, Prostate, Urologic surgery




Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/9780203931622.023?prevSearch=allfield%253A%2528acupuncture%2529&searchHistoryKey=

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BMJ Acupuncture in Medicine on the debate over "what acupuncture can be promoted for"

BMJ Acupuncture in Medicine on the debate over  "what acupuncture can be promoted for" | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

This journal is careful about the image of acupuncture that it presents to the world, and about any claims made for acupuncture.

 

Ethical practitioners are equally cautious in what they promote. This is no place for a discussion on what conditions can and cannot be claimed as treatable by acupuncture, though it might start by noting that it's patients that are treated, not conditions.

 

That distinction seems to be ignored by the ‘authorities’ who have decided what can and cannot be claimed, at least in the UK. Bishop and colleagues had a good look at the information leaflets produced by 629 clinics; most were excellent, though there were a few examples where claims were not evidence based.

 

Ref: In this issue -- White 31 (4): 349 

source: http://aim.bmj.com/content/31/4/349.full


Via Shaftesbury Clinic, Shaftesbury Clinic Bedford
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Shaftesbury Clinic's curator insight, December 30, 2013 5:47 AM

Recent controversy has surrounded how acupuncturists can promote themselves, and the Advertising Standards Agency (ASA) have been examining this in detail.

 

As White says in this article, it is not conditions that acupuncturists concentrate on, but patients.  We look to advise patients as to what acupuncture may realistically offer them, in the light of our experience, training, and research available to us.  

 

It is for this reason that these research pages are provided, to allow those interested in finding out more about acupuncture, the opportunity to find information and track back to origininal sources, to help them to carry out their own informed ressearch and to make an informed decision about whether to use acupuncture.

 

I also recommend speaking to an acupuncturist, if you are considering acupuncture, as most will offer a free consultation to allow you find out more, before deciding on whether to go ahead with treatment.  

 

Helen Smallwood 

Acupuncturist

Bedford, UK

www.shaftesburyclinic.com 

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The efficacy of acupuncture in treating urge and mixed incontinence in women: a pilot study. [J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2009 Nov-Dec] - PubMed - NCBI

The efficacy of acupuncture in treating urge and mixed incontinence in women: a pilot study. [J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2009 Nov-Dec] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2009 Nov-Dec;36(6):661-70. doi: 10.1097/WON.0b013e3181bd82dd.The efficacy of acupuncture in treating urge and mixed incontinence in women: a pilot study.Engberg S, Cohen S, Sereika SM.Source

School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, 440 Victoria Bldg, 3500 Victoria St, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. sje1@pitt.edu

AbstractPURPOSE:

The propose of this pilot study was to examine the feasibility of recruiting women into a clinical trial designed to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in treating urge and mixed urinary incontinence (UI) and the feasibility of performing the planned study procedures. We also sought to determine if there was preliminary evidence to suggest that acupuncture may be effective in reducing UI and improving general health-related and disease-specific quality of life and if a sham acupuncture needle is an effective placebo intervention.

DESIGN:

This pilot study was a double-blinded, randomized, clinical trial. Subjects were randomly assigned to a true or sham (placebo control) acupuncture group. Both true and sham acupuncture treatments were performed twice a week for 6 weeks. All subjects were evaluated at the completion of the 6-week intervention and 4 weeks later.

SAMPLE:

The sample consisted of 9 women between the ages of 44 and 66 years with urge or mixed urge and stress UI at least twice a week for a minimum of 3 months.

MEASURES:

Subjects completed a 1-week bladder diary at baseline and at 1 and 4 weeks postacupuncture to assess the impact of acupuncture on incontinence episodes. Quality of life was measured at baseline and at 1 and 4 weeks postacupuncture using the Medical Outcomes Short-Form (general health- related quality of life) and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire and Urogenital Distress Inventory (incontinence-specific quality of life).

RESULTS:

It was feasible to recruit subjects and perform the planned study procedures. Subjects randomized to the true acupuncture group had a mean 63.30% (median = 65.99%) reduction in daytime accidents/day at 1 week postacupuncture and 67.47% reduction (median = 75.76%) at 4 weeks postacupuncture. In contrast, the mean reduction in daytime accidents was 18.88% (median = 19.64%) at 1 week and 16.67% (median = 0%) at 4 weeks post-sham acupuncture. There were no significant group differences in changes in the scores on the quality-of-life measures. Subjects' perceptions about whether they had received the true or sham acupuncture were not significantly better than one would expect by chance.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings of this pilot study support the need for additional research examining the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of UI in women, the feasibility of performing study procedures, and the use of a sham needle as placebo in acupuncture studies.

PMID: 19920749 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Acupuncture relieves hot flashes from prostate cancer treatment (ternational Journal of Radiation Oncology•Biology•Physics, an official journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO))

Acupuncture relieves hot flashes from prostate cancer treatment (ternational Journal of Radiation Oncology•Biology•Physics, an official journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)) | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

Acupuncture provides long-lasting relief to hot flashes, heart palpitations and anxiety due to side effects of the hormone given to counteract testosterone, the hormone that induces prostate cancer, according to a study published in the April issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology•Biology•Physics, an official journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

 The main treatments for men with metastatic prostate cancer are either surgery or hormone therapy to significantly reduce the level of testosterone in the body. Eliminatingtestosterone has been proven to keep the cancer in check by starving the cancer of hormones it needs to grow and spread. However, about half of the time, this therapy also causes very uncomfortable hot flashes similar to those women experience during menopause. The main way to combat hot flashes is to take antidepressants, but these drugs can cause side effects of their own, including nausea, dry mouth, sleeplessness, altered appetite and sexual changes.

In a prospective study conducted in the department of radiation oncology and the acupuncture section of New York Methodist Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, both in New York, researchers evaluated 14 men who were experiencing hot flashes due to hormone therapy for prostate cancer. Upon enrolling in the study, the men were given a hot flash score (HFS) to evaluate their discomfort from daily hot flashes. The mean initial HFS was 28.3.

 

Participants then received acupuncture twice a week for 30 minutes at a time for four weeks. Two weeks after receiving acupuncture, their HFS was measured again and had dropped more than half to 10.3. At six weeks post-treatment, their HFS was 7.5. After eight months, the men were evaluated again and their mean HFS was 7.

 

"Our study shows that physicians and patients have an additional treatment for something that affects many men undergoing prostate cancer treatment and actually has long-term benefits, as opposed to more side effects," Hani Ashamalla, M.D., lead author of the study and a radiation oncologist at New York Methodist Hospital, said. "We are now designing a randomized clinical trial to further evaluate acupuncture afterprostate cancer treatment. I encourage men suffering this symptom to talk to their doctors about enrolling."

 

More information: For more information on radiation therapy for prostate cancer, visit 

www.rtanswers.org/treatmentinformation/cancertypes/prostate

 

Provided by American Society for Radiation Oncology

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Urinary calculus of Auricular Acupuncture Treatment

Urinary calculus of Auricular Acupuncture Treatment | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it
August 3, 2011

L. Chen39 used the following points to relieve the symptoms of bladder stones as well as expulsion of the stones: Kidney, Endocrine, Urinary Bladder, and Sympathetic as the main ear points, and Spleen, Triple Warmer, Urethra, Brain, and Ureters as auxiliary points, using the semen vaccaria method. Q. Wang and Y. Y. Zhao  found that “urinary retention due to postoperative anal pain was successfully relieved by needling in the ear.Shenmen, Sympathetic, and the center of the triangular fossa were used. The needles were rotated for 1 minute and then rotated until micturition began. The time frame within which micturition began ranged from 5 to 30 minutes after treatment started.”

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Acupuncture in the treatment of diabetic bladder dysfunction. [J Altern Complement Med. 2009] - PubMed - NCBI

Acupuncture in the treatment of diabetic bladder dysfunction. [J Altern Complement Med. 2009] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it
J Altern Complement Med. 2009 Aug;15(8):905-9. doi: 10.1089/acm.2009.0062.Acupuncture in the treatment of diabetic bladder dysfunction.Tong Y, Jia Q, Sun Y, Hou Z, Wang Y.Source

Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital to Changchun University of Chinese Medicine, Changchun City, Jilin Province, China. tyq1229@yahoo.com.cn

AbstractOBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of acupuncture on diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD).

METHODS:

This study compared 30 cases in the acupuncture group with 15 cases in the sham acupuncture group (n = 45 total). The effects of acupuncture were observed on urodynamic measurements, as well as a variety of symptoms associated with DBD.

RESULTS:

In the acupuncture group, five of the six urodynamic measures (maximal detrusor pressure, bladder compliance, maximal bladder capacity, bladder volume at desire to void and urge to void) demonstrated significant improvement (p < 0.05, 0.01) over the 15-day treatment period. Only one measure (bladder volume at urge to void) significantly improved (p < 0.05) in the sham acupuncture group. There were significant differences after therapy in four measures (bladder compliance, maximal bladder capacity, bladder volume at desire to void, and urge to void) between the groups (p < 0.05, 0.01). A significant difference of the changes in symptoms compared with pretreatment in the acupuncture group was observed (p < 0.05, 0.01). In 25 subjects in the acupuncture group, incontinence improved from 2.4 to 1.4. In the sham acupuncture group, incontinence deteriorated from 2.2 to 2.3.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our pilot study has provided evidence that acupuncture may be clinically useful for the radical treatment of DBD.

PMID: 19678782 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Acupuncture.Com - Research - Nocturnal Enuresis

Acupuncture.Com - Research - Nocturnal Enuresis | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

By Roje-Starcevic M.

[The treatment of nocturnal enuresis by acupuncture]

Neurologija, 1990, 39(3):179-84. 
(UI: 91148725) 
AT: UCLA siomed W1 NE265 
(PE title: Neurologija)

Abstract: The etiology of enuresis is not completely explained. It is assumed that it might be a psychosomatic disorder caused by psychological and urological predispositions combined with unfavorable environmental factors.

Thirty-seven patients of both sexes (mean age 8 years) were included in the acupuncture treatment. They had not shown any improvement after psychotherapy. During the observation period of 6 months (180 days) after the acupuncture treatment, the statistical decrease of enuresis was evident (2.9), thus confirming that acupuncture represents a new possibility of treatment of patients with enuresis.

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Effect of perioperative electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy on postoperative analgesia with tramadol and ketamine in prostatectomy: a randomised sham-controlled single-blind trial -- Ntrits...

Effect of perioperative electroacupuncture as an adjunctive therapy on postoperative analgesia with tramadol and ketamine in prostatectomy: a randomised sham-controlled single-blind trial -- Ntrits... | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it
Abstract

Objectives To study the analgesic effect of electroacupuncture (EA) as perioperative adjunctive therapy added to a systemic analgesic strategy (including tramadol and ketamine) for postoperative pain, opioid-related side effects and patient satisfaction.

Methods In a sham-controlled participant- and observer-blinded trial, 75 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were randomly assigned to two groups: (1) EA (n=37; tramadol+ketamine+EA) and (2) control (n=38; tramadol+ketamine). EA (100 Hz frequency) was applied at LI4 bilaterally during the closure of the abdominal walls and EA (4 Hz) was applied at ST36 and LI4 bilaterally immediately after extubation. The control group had sham acupuncture without penetration or stimulation. The following outcomes were evaluated: postoperative pain using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and McGill Scale (SF_MPQ), mechanical pain thresholds using algometer application close to the wound, cortisol measurements, rescue analgesia, Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI Y-6 item), patient satisfaction and opioid side effects.

Results Pain scores on the NRS and SF_MPQ were significantly lower and electronic pressure algometer measurements were significantly higher in the EA group than in the control group (p<0.001) at all assessments. In the EA group a significant decrease in rescue analgesia was observed at 45 min (p<0.001) and a significant decrease in cortisol levels was also observed (p<0.05). Patients expressed satisfaction with the analgesia, especially in the EA group (p<0.01). Significant delays in the start of bowel movements were observed in the control group at 45 min (p<0.001) and 2 h (p<0.05).

Conclusions Adding EA perioperatively should be considered an option as part of a multimodal analgesic strategy.

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Acupuncture stimulation of ST36 (Zusanli) attenuates acute renal but not hepatic injury in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rats. [Anesth Analg. 2007] - PubMed - NCBI

Acupuncture stimulation of ST36 (Zusanli) attenuates acute renal but not hepatic injury in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rats.  [Anesth Analg. 2007] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

Anesth Analg. 2007 Mar;104(3):646-54.Acupuncture stimulation of ST36 (Zusanli) attenuates acute renal but not hepatic injury in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rats.Huang CL1, Tsai PS, Wang TY, Yan LP, Xu HZ, Huang CJ.Author information 


Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We sought to determine the effects of ST36 acupuncture on sepsis-induced kidney and liver injuries.

METHODS:

A total of 120 rats were randomized into 10 groups: 1) lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 2) normal saline (N/S), 3) LPS + ST36, 4) ST36, 5) LPS + P-ST36, 6) P-ST36, 7) LPS + Sham, 8) Sham, 9) LPS + P-Sham, and 10) P-Sham groups. Rats in the LPS + ST36, ST36, LPS +Sham, and Sham groups received ST36 (designated as "ST36") or a nonacupoint (designated as "Sham") acupuncture for 30 min followed by LPS or N/S injection. Rats in the LPS + P-ST36, P-ST36, LPS + P-Sham, and P-Sham groups received LPS or N/S injection for 3 h followed by a 30 min of ST36 or a "nonacupoint" acupuncture. Rats were killed at 6 h after LPS injection.

RESULTS:

LPS caused prominent kidney and liver injuries. The renal and hepatic nitric oxide (NO) concentrations and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression were also increased by LPS. ST36 acupuncture pretreatment significantly attenuated the LPS-induced kidney injury and the increases in renal NO concentration and iNOS expression. However, ST36 acupuncture pretreatment did not affect the LPS-induced liver injury and increases in hepatic NO concentration or iNOS expression. Furthermore, ST36 acupuncture performed after LPS did not affect the LPS-induced organ injuries or increases in NO concentration and iNOS expression.

CONCLUSIONS:

ST36 acupuncture pretreatment significantly attenuated sepsis-induced kidney, but not liver, injury in rats, whereas ST36 acupuncture performed after sepsis induction had no protective effects against sepsis-induced organ injuries.

PMID: 17312224 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Effects of acupuncture at Taixi acupoint (KI3) on kidney proteome [Am J Chin Med. 2011] - PubMed - NCBI

Effects of acupuncture at Taixi acupoint (KI3) on kidney proteome  [Am J Chin Med. 2011] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

Am J Chin Med. 2011;39(4):687-92.Effects of acupuncture at Taixi acupoint (KI3) on kidney proteome.Li CR1, Cheng ZD, Zhang ZX, Kim A, Ha JM, Song YY, Zheng J, Chen YG.Author information Abstract

This research explored and identified the protein composition of rat kidneys after acupuncture at the Taixi acupoint (KI3). Twelve adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a control group (n = 6) and an acupuncture group (n = 6). Rats in the acupuncture group received electroacupuncture on the bilateral KI3 for seven days. The kidneys were perfused with ice-cold saline and all kidney proteins were isolated. After protein sample preparation, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was performed. The interesting spots were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). There were nine protein spots with three-fold up-regulation in the kidney after the acupuncture. NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase and quinone reductase, the proteins involved in energy metabolism, the reduction of endogenous quinones, chemoprotection, and electrophilic stress, were identified. The data indicated that acupuncture at the KI3 of the kidney meridian of the foot shaoyin was able to increase NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase and quinone reductase expression in the kidney, and supported the relationship between the kidney and KI3.

 

 

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Effect of acupuncture on renal function and pathologic changes of kidney in rabbits with nephritis [Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI

Effect of acupuncture on renal function and pathologic changes of kidney in rabbits with nephritis [Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2012 Sep;32(9):819-23.[Effect of acupuncture on renal function and pathologic changes of kidney in rabbits with nephritis].[Article in Chinese]An P1, Sun WS, Wu XL, Shi XM, Wang Z.Author information AbstractOBJECTIVE:

To observe the effect of acupuncture on cationized bovine serum albumin (C-BSA) nephritis model in rabbits and to explore its mechanism.

METHODS:

Fifty rabbits were randomly divided into a blank group, a model group, a metoprolol group, a irbesartan group and an acupuncture group, 10 rabbits in each group. The model was established by ear vein intravenous injection with C-BSA. The positive control groups were treated by intragastric administrated with metoprolol and irbesartan, respectively. The acupuncture group was treated by acupuncture at "Fengmen" (BL 12) and "Shenshu" (BL 23). No interventions were added on the blank group and the model group. The changes of blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), plasma norepinephrine (NE), serum creatinine (Scr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and 24 hours urine protein (24 h UP) in rabbits at the time points of 3rd, 6th and 8th week of treatment were observed.

RESULTS:

After the model was established, the Scr of (194.30 +/- 20.09) micromol/L, BUN of (9.19 +/- 0.66) mmol/L and 24 h UP of (277.70 +/- 20.09) mg/24 h in the model group were all higher than the Scr of (66.03 +/- 4. 76) micromol/L, BUN of (4.11 +/- 0.71) mmol/L and 24 h UP of (14.28 +/- 1. 47) mg/24 h in the blank group (all P < 0.01), and the diffused mesenteria hyperplasia and the increase of intercapillary cells in the model group were showed in the pathological sections. After 3 weeks of treatment. The Scr of (99.82 +/- 9.29) micromol/L, BUN of (6.32 +/- 0.75) mmol/L and 24 h UP of (189.67 +/- 15.45) mg/ 24 h in the acupuncture group were all decreased significantly, furthermore, the decrease of BP, HR, NE were better than the other treatment groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Except the level of 24 h up and HR at 8th week, other results were as same as the 3rd week.

CONCLUSION:

Acupuncture can improve the function of kidney, decrease the content of 24 h UP and the underlying therapeutic mechanism could be correlated with that acupuncture can lower excitability of sympathetic nerve and alleviate the renal pathological lesion induced by nephritis.

PMID: 23227692 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

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Traditional Acupuncture and Electrical Stimulation of the Posterior Tibial Nerve, Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, Informa Healthcare

Traditional Acupuncture and Electrical Stimulation of the Posterior Tibial Nerve, Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, Informa Healthcare | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

Scandinavian Journal of Urology
Original ArticleTraditional Acupuncture and Electrical Stimulation of the Posterior Tibial Nerve
A Trial in Chronic Interstitial Cystitis

 

1993, Vol. 27, No. 1 , Pages 67-70PDF (352 KB)PDF Plus (154 KB)ReprintsPermissionsGudmundur Geirsson1, Yu-Hui Wang1, Sivert Lindström2, Magnus Fall11Department of Surgery, Urology Division, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, University of Göteborg, Sweden2Department of Physiology, University of Göteborg, Sweden

 

 

A prospective study on the symptomatic effect of traditional Chinese acupuncture treatment and transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) of the tibial nerve in patients with interstitial cystitis is presented. There was no difference in voiding frequency, mean voided volume, maximal voided volume or visual analogue scale symptom scores before or after treatment with either TENS oracupuncture. Only one patient became improved both subjectively and objectively afteracupuncture for a short period of time. Even though the present material involves a small group of patients, it seems that the two methods, as applied in this study, have a very limited effect in patients with interstitial cystitis.

Keywordsacupuncture, electrical stimulation, interstitial cystitis 

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Acupuncture Reduces Experimental Renovascular Hypertension Through Mechanisms Involving Nitric Oxide Synthases, Microcirculation, Informa Healthcare

Acupuncture Reduces Experimental Renovascular Hypertension Through Mechanisms Involving Nitric Oxide Synthases, Microcirculation, Informa Healthcare | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

Microcirculation 

Articles

Acupuncture Reduces Experimental Renovascular Hypertension Through Mechanisms Involving Nitric Oxide Synthases

 

2006, Vol. 13, No. 7 , Pages 577-585

David D. Kim1*, Arnaldo M. Pica1, Ricardo G. Durán1, Walter N. Durán11Program in Vascular Biology, Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, UMDNJ–New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey, USA*Correspondence: David D. Kim, Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, UMDNJ–New Jersey Medical School, 185 South Orange Avenue, MSB H-661, Newark, NJ, 07101-1709, USA

 

 

Objective: To test the hypothesis that acupuncture on stomach 36 point (ST-36) reduces hypertension by activating nitric oxide synthase signaling mechanisms.

Methods: The authors used the two-kidney, one-clip renal hypertension (2K1C) hamster model with electroacupuncture treatment.

Results: Thirty-minute daily electroacupuncture treatment for 5 days reduced mean arterial pressure from 160.0 ± 7.6 to 128.0 ± 4.3 mmHg (mean ± SEM), compared to 115.0 ± 7.2 mmHg in sham-operated hamsters. Electroacupuncture increased periarteriolar NO concentration from 309.0 ± 21.7 nM to 417.9 ± 20.9 nM in the 2K1C hamster cheek pouch microcirculation when measured with NO-sensitive microelectrodes. Hypertension reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) proteins relative to the sham-operated control, as measured by Western blotting. Electroacupuncture prevented the reduction of eNOS and nNOS associated with hypertension and showed even higher eNOS and nNOS expressions than sham-operated control in stomach and cheek pouch tissues, which are on the stomach meridian. Analysis of liver tissue, a non-stomach-meridian organ, indicated that electroacupuncture did not have a significant benefit in terms of enhanced expressions of eNOS and nNOS in the treated 2K1C hypertensive group.

Conclusions: Activation of eNOS and nNOS is one of the mechanisms through which ST-36 electroacupuncture reduces blood pressure; this reduction works through the stomach meridian.

Keywordsacupuncture, complementary and alternative medicine, hypertension, meridian theory,microcirculation, nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthase, ST-36

Acupuncture Bedford's insight:

This is an animal experiment in acupuncture to look at acupuncture's effect on blood pressure and circulation in the kidneys.

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Acupuncture and prostatitis - research

Acupuncture and prostatitis - research | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

MEDICATION FOR PROSTATITIS

ZHANG, Y. K., ZHANG, M. X., and Wu, Q.;

 

Clinical Observations on Treatment of 80 Chronic Prostatitis Patients with Combined Acupuncture and Medicine (in Chinese). [Shanghai Journal of Acupuncture and Moxibustion] 2003. Vol.22[06], p.19-20.

 

Purpose: To comparatively observe the curative effect of combined acupuncture and medicine on chronic prostatitis (CP).

 

Methods: The patients were randomly divided into a treatment group of 80 cases and a control group of 30 cases.

 

The clinical effects were evaluated. Results: Both the cure rate and the total effective rate were higher in the treatment group than in the control group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). In the treatment group there was no significant difference in curative effect between bacterial CP and nonbacterial CP (P > 0.05). In the control group the curative effect on bacterial CP was significantly superior to that no nonbacterial CP.

 

Conclusion: Treatment with combined acupuncture and medicine is a good therapy for nonbacterial CP

 

Chinese name: SHANG HAI ZHEN JIU ZA ZHI; ISSN: 1005-0957; Period: Monthly; Date of Publication: the 25th of every month; Sponsor: Shanghai Academy of TCM; Shanghai Society of Acupuncture and Moxibustion; E-mail: shzj@chinajournal.net.cn ; Tel: 86-21-64382181 (Editorial Office).

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Acupuncture and Nocturnal Eneuresis (Bedwetting) research papers

Acupuncture and Nocturnal Eneuresis (Bedwetting) research papers | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

MEDICATION FOR NOCTURAL ENURESIS

Capozza, N., Creti, G., De Gennaro, M., Minni, B., and Caione, P.; The treatment of nocturnal enuresis. A comparative study between desmopressin and acupuncture used alone or in combination. [Italian]. Minerva Pediatr 1991. Vol.43[9], p.577-582. Servizio di Urologia Pediatrica, Ospedale del Bambino Gesu, Roma 5105 During the period from March to September 1989, 40 children suffering from primary nocturnal enuresis, aged between 5 and 14 years, were included in a study to assess the comparative therapeutical efficacy of DDAVP and acupuncture. Children were divided into four groups of 10: group A was treated with DDAVP, group B was treated with acupuncture, group C was treated with DDAVP and acupuncture and group D was treated with placebo (control). The trial design included 3 periods: observation (2 weeks), treatment (8 weeks) and follow-up (4 weeks). Nineteen children completed the study. The efficacy of treatment, which was expressed as a percentage of dry nights, was high in both the DDAVP and acupuncture groups, when used separately. The combined treatment of DDAVP and acupuncture appeared to be the most efficacious both in terms of the percentage of dry nights at the end of treatment and in relation to the stability of results, even after the end of the study. The paper gives a detailed analysis of correlations between type of treatment and urinary osmolarity. Controlled clinical trial.


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Acupuncture Therapy for Chronic Kidney Disease - from Kidney Cares Community

Acupuncture Therapy for Chronic Kidney Disease - from Kidney Cares Community | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it

Acupuncture Therapy for Chronic Kidney Disease

2013-07-15 14:44

 

Acupuncture, as one important part of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), has been widely used in many countries for treating various diseases including chronic kidney disease. How does acupuncture therapy work for chronic kidney disease?

 

An overview of acupuncture therapy


Acupuncture is one therapy that treating internal disease with external methods. Before the whole treatment, doctor should first find out the root cause of patients’ condition by diagnostic method in TCM, in order to determine the cause is due to which regulating bodily function and viscera, exterior or interior, cold or fever and deficiency or excess. Then, the doctor can make an accurate treatment plan.

 

What can acupuncture therapy do for chronic kidney disease?


Acupuncture is honored as “most natural treatment”, because it aims to treating disease without medicines. Generally, it is safe for nearly everyone unless the person has bleeding, skin infection or some other diseases. If you have chronic kidney disease and the doctor has determined you are the candidate for acupuncture therapy, you can the following therapeutic effects from acupuncture:

 

● Improve your urine condition

As CKD progresses, urination may change largely. Less urine, blood urine and frequent urination at night all are common symptoms. The new finding indicates that acupuncture can stimulate Shenshu acupoint, which can increase urine volume and ease blood urine. This effect can slove the fluid retention in the body effectively, thus alleviating some patients’ swelling.

 

● Boost immune system

Through stimulating some specific acupoints, acupuncture can regulate immune disorders efficiently. This effect is achieved via double ways: enhance immunity and inhibit hyperactive immune response.

 

● Regulate kidney function

On the one hand, doctors use acupuncture to stimulate the kidney channels and bladder channels, so kidneys can eliminate more waste products such as creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. On the other hand, acupuncture helps improve patients’ GFR via nervous reflex mechanism. As long as patients’ kidney function is improved successfully, their illness condition will be reversed largely.

 

The above is an introduction of acupuncture therapy for Chronic Kidney Disease. If you are suffering from CKD and want to try this therapy, make sure you don't have any contraindication.

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Impotence Gets 'Needled' in Acupuncture Study

Impotence Gets 'Needled' in Acupuncture Study | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it
Impotence Gets 'Needled' in Acupuncture Study
October 1, 2012 

May 5, 2000 (Atlanta) -- Acupuncture has been used to treat people in the Far East for thousands of years, so it may strike some people as amusing that it is being studied in the West as a potentially "new" treatment for everything from back pain to depression. According to some Austrian scientists, erectile dysfunction, or impotence, can now be added to that list.

 

Impotence can be caused by many factors, from imbalances in hormones, to actual physical damage, to psychological or emotional problems. Paul F. Engelhardt, MD, of the Hospital Leinz in Vienna, Austria, and colleagues are in the midst of an ongoing study to see if men suffering from impotence that has more of a mental cause can be helped by acupuncture. Engelhardt presented preliminary findings at a meeting of urologists here this week.

 

Acupuncture involves placing very fine needles in various parts of the body to relieve pain or stress. All 13 men in the study, average age 42, received acupuncture. But they were split into two groups receiving different treatments.

 

One group received the actual acupuncture for impotence. The other group received acupuncture but in areas that weren't related to relieving impotence. The researchers did this to see if there was a strong "placebo effect," in which the patients have relief from just thinking they're receiving treatment.

 

The first group, which contained seven men, received two acupuncture sessions a week for 10 weeks using "acupuncture with several points for erectile dysfunction that are traditional Chinese acupoints," Engelhardt says.

 

Six men in the second group underwent four weeks of acupuncture. "The so-called placebo group," Engelhardt tells WebMD, "was also treated with acupoints, but these points did not correlate with the diagnose of [erectile dysfunction]."

 

In order to make sure the men's impotence was not linked to a physical cause, they were put to a test. For three nights, they were given a drug to cause an erection. Based upon something called "RigiScan testing," all the men achieved a "full erection," according to Engelhardt.

At one point, the groups were switched. "Our results are that none of the patients of the placebo group reported good results of the placebo treatment, so all of them were crossed over into design of group one," Engelhardt tells WebMD.

 

The final results? Eight of the participants claimed they were "cured." "About two-thirds of our patients reported good results of our acupuncture therapy; they defined themselves as cured; they didn't demand any additional therapy," Engelhardt says.

 

"About one-third of the patients told us that they had some improvements of their quality of life, that their erections were a little bit better than at the start of the treatment," Engelhardt says. "But it was not sufficient enough, so they wanted some additional therapy, and we treated them with Viagra."

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Is Acupuncture Helpful For Stage 3 Kidney Failure-Kidney Failure?

Is Acupuncture Helpful For Stage 3 Kidney Failure-Kidney Failure? | Acupuncture and the urinary system | Scoop.it
Is Acupuncture Helpful For Stage 3 Kidney Failure2013-06-04 11:22

Is acupuncture helpful for stage 3 kidney failure? Stage 3 kidney failure is marked by moderate decrease of kidney function. At this point, if we can restore some kidney function on the promise of protecting residual kidney tissues, stage 3 kidney failure can be reversed partly. Acupuncture has been practiced in China and some other Asian countries for thousands of years. It is said to have function of improving kidney condition. Is that true? Is acupuncture helpful for stage 3 kidney failure?

How does acupuncture help kidneys?

Acupuncture is a collection of procedures which involves the stimulation of points on the body using a variety of techniques, such as penetrating the skin with needles that are then manipulated manually or by electrical stimulation. Acupuncture benefits kidney in different ways:

1. By stimulate corresponding acupoints, kidney function can be improved.

2. Acupuncture strengthens immune system, which can help to withstand colds, minor infection and flu. No matter for people with or without kidney failure, preventing cold and infection are important as they can trigger various health tissues if not treated well.

3. Renal ischemia and renal hypoxia are the major tow causes for kidney tissues to fail to work properly. Acupuncture is believed to be able to improve blood circulation which can help to prevent renal ischemia and renal hypoxia.

Is acupuncture helpful for stage 3 kidney failure?

Stage 3 kidney failure is not severe enough for patients to start dialysis or kidney transplant, but if left untreated, it will progress to end stage renal disease quickly. From this point of view, an effective treatment means a lot for stage 3 kidney failure patients.

Acupuncture is helpful for stage 3 kidney failure, but it is not effective enough to cure kidney damages. In an involved kidney, there are healthy, injured and dead kidney intrinsic cells. These dead kidney cells can not be brought back to life again, but for these who are injured seriously, some medicines are needed to help them recover.

Acupuncture helps stage 3 kidney failure patients, but it should not be taken as the only treatment. To make the treatment effects obvious, it can be used together with some other medicines and this will benefit stage 3 kidney failure patients a lot.

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