Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones
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Acupuncture Reverses High Cholesterol Cell Fat

Acupuncture Reverses High Cholesterol Cell Fat | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Acupuncture prevents and reverses dangerous cellular accumulations of fatty materials in cases of high cholesterol thereby preventing atherosclerotic plaques and heart disease. New laboratory research confirms that needling a specific acupuncture point located on the lower leg prevents and reverses the formation of foam cells. This type of cell forms at the site of fatty streaks and is the beginning of atherosclerotic plaque formation in blood vessels. The presence of foam cells is indicative of an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes. Based on the research, the investigators note that acupuncture could “play an essential role in treating hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol and triglycerides) and stopping it from developing into a further level.”

Oxidized LDL cholesterol creates inflammation within blood vessels. As a result, immune system cells called macrophages are attracted to the site of inflammation and consume the LDL cholesterol. Ordinarily, macrophages defend against bacteria and other pathogens. However, macrophages can become engulfed in fatty materials when attempting to eliminate excess cholesterol. Under a microscope, one can see that the macrophages become overrun with cholesterol and other fatty materials. The damaged macrophages take on a foamy appearance, hence the name foam cell. Foam cells indicate that dangerous plaques are beginning to form within the vessels. The researchers conclude that electroacupuncture at acupuncture point ST40 (Fenglong) “prevents and reverse(s) the formation of foam cell(s).” In this way, acupuncture helps to fight hyperlipidemia and prevent heart disease.

The research proves that ST40 electroacupuncture “significantly prohibits the transformation of macrophage(s) into foam cell(s).” The research measured sharp reductions in foam cells through the application of acupuncture. Stimulation of acupoint ST40 was shown to decrease the cholesterol content of macrophages. Cells can accomplish this in two ways. The first way is to convert cholesterol into cholesterol esters. This method is limited because it may overrun cells with esters and consequent toxicity.

Needling acupuncture point ST40 accomplishes cholesterol reduction by another method that is completely non-toxic. ST40 stimulation increases the rate of cholesterol efflux from macrophages. Cholesterol efflux is a process of eliminating cholesterol from cells that is regulated by intracellular transporters including ATP proteins A1, G1 and B1. Unlike the cholesterol ester process, the efflux process has a virtually unlimited capacity to reduce cholesterol because there is no danger of building up excess cellular cholesterol esters. Needling ST40 with electroacupuncture activates an important, safe and powerful method for cells to reduce excess cholesterol content. 

Getting To The Point
ST40 is located on the lower leg and is midway between the popliteal crease and the lateral malleolus, two finger-breadths lateral to the anterior crest of the tibia. This is approximately the midpoint between the knee and the ankle on the lateral portion of the lower leg. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), this point stimulates the transformation of phlegm and dampness. This TCM function is consistent with the new research. ST40 reduces excess cholesterol accumulations from cells. Lipids are categorized as a form of dampness in TCM. In this way, ST40’s ability to engage cholesterol efflux is a biological correlate for the TCM function of transforming dampness.

ST40 is also ascribed the function of benefitting the chest in the TCM system. This too is consistent with the new research in that ST40’s ability to increase cholesterol efflux helps to prevent heart disease. The TCM system also documents that ST40 calms the spirit and is indicated for the treatment of , vertigo, coughs, excess sputum, chest pain and swelling of the lower limbs. ST40 (Fenglong, Abundant Bulge) is an important acupuncture point in the TCM system because it is a Luo-connecting point to the Spleen Leg-Taiyin channel. 

Online Acupuncture Continuing Education
Acupuncture, Chinese medicine dietetics and herbal medicine are all part of the TCM system for the treatment of high cholesterol and high triglycerides. Visit the HealthCMi.com acupuncture CEU (continuing education unit) web page to learn more about online continuing education courses for the treatment of high cholesterol and triglycerides with TCM. Licensed acupuncturists receive state and nationally approved acupuncture continuing education CEUs, NCCAOM Diplomate PDAs, CAEs and CEs for HealthCMi online courses.

Macrophage Research
The recent foam cell research on the beneficial effects of acupuncture on macrophages comes at a time when other remarkable research has emerged. Recently, an investigation published in Molecular Neurobiology reveals that acupuncture reduces inflammation and muscle pain by downregulating M1 macrophages (pro-inflammatory cells) and upregulating M2 macrophages (anti-inflammatory cells). The study measured responses in muscle tissues and confirms that M1 to M2 macrophage phenotype switching is triggered by acupuncture stimulation. Acupuncture stimulates biological actions wherein inflammatory responses are reduced and cellular healing responses are engaged.


References:
Chen, Y. F., J. Y. Tian, Y. Xiao, H. Wu, H. Huang, and H. X. Zhang. "Effects of electroacupuncture at" Fenglong"(ST 40) on formation of macrophage-derived foam cell and efflux of cholesterol in hyperlipidemia rats." Zhongguo zhen jiu= Chinese acupuncture & moxibustion 34, no. 5 (2014): 475.

Low H1, Hoang A, Sviridov D. Cholesterol efflux assay. J Vis Exp. 2012 Mar 6;(61):e3810. doi: 10.3791/3810.

da Silva, Morgana D., Franciane Bobinski, Karina L. Sato, Sandra J. Kolker, Kathleen A. Sluka, and Adair RS Santos. "IL-10 Cytokine Released from M2 Macrophages Is Crucial for Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Acupuncture in a Model of Inflammatory Muscle Pain." Molecular Neurobiology (2014): 1-13

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What You Need To Know About PCOS And Chinese Medicine

What You Need To Know About PCOS And Chinese Medicine | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it
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What You Need To Know About PCOS And Chinese Medicine
 By Jennifer Dubowsky, www.tcm007.com | September 21, 2014
Last Updated: September 21, 2014 10:44 am

(Shutterstock*)


Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal disorder that is estimated to affect five million American women every year. It often results in irregular or no menstruation and fertility difficulties due to the lack of regular ovulation. This condition got its name because most of the women with PCOS (but not all) have ovaries that look enlarged and contain numerous small cysts on the outer edge of each ovary. Besides infrequent periods and difficulty getting pregnant, women suffer other symptoms such as excess hair growth, acne and weight gain. Long term complications include type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and heart disease. Not all women get the same symptoms or with the same severity which makes diagnosing PCOS difficult and often frustrating.

The cause of polycystic ovarian syndrome is still unknown. If a close female family member has it, you might have a higher chance of having it, too. There does seem to be a link between insulin resistance and PCOS. Insulin is a hormone that our pancreas secretes to help us metabolize sugar. When someone is insulin resistant they do not use the insulin as efficiently and the pancreas has to secrete more insulin to control the blood sugar causing an excess of insulin. It is believed that one possible cause of PCOS is that the extra insulin causes the ovaries to produce more male hormones (known as androgens). This is why symptoms can include excess facial hair and acne. Also one of the drugs,used to treat PCOS, Metformin, is a drug for type 2 diabetes that lowers insulin levels.

 

From the Western Medical perspective, there are many treatment options for PCOS. What type of treatment depends on the health concerns of that patient. Options include a variety of medications. Often birth control pills are prescribed to regulate the hormones and reduce androgen levels. As I mentioned above, Metformin is another choice because it lowers insulin levels and this can lead to a more regular cycle and ovulation. If you are trying to get pregnant, then Clomid is a common drug given to help ovulation. Surgery is another option, when other treatments have failed, and it is usually done laparoscopically.

Lifestyle choices can also make a difference. Eating a low carbohydrate diet, exercising and keeping your weight in check all help. Obesity increases insulin resistance as does eating a diet high in fat and simple carbohydrates.

Chinese Medicine is a highly effective treatment for Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. Both acupuncture and herbs can help regulate your cycle and alleviate many of the other unpleasant symptoms. Traditional Chinese Medicine is also very good for improving fertility if PCOS is making getting pregnant more difficult. Treatment plans are unique to the patient, and it usually takes three to six months of regular treatment to obtain optimal results. I find the best outcomes occur when a woman uses both acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine together, though some patients prefer to do just one or the other. Once your period becomes more regular, I recommend the patient continue with herbs and get acupuncture once a month to maintain her cycle – especially if she is trying to conceive.

In March of this year, researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology in Sweden published the results of a new study in the American Journal of Physiology – Endocrinology and Metabolism. Their study included thirty-two women with PCOS who were randomly chosen to receive either acupuncture with electrical stimulation or physical therapy. They were all treated twice a week for 10-13 weeks. Researchers found that the acupuncture group had significantly reduced ovarian and adrenal sex steroid serum levels. The levels returned to healthier numbers with no effect on the luteinizing hormone. They also concluded that repeated acupuncture treatments resulted in a higher ovulation frequency and was more effective than just physical therapy. This study provides further evidence that acupuncture may help control the PCOS symptoms due to its regulatory function on the endocrine system.

Another small study published in the same journal two years ago found that electro-acupuncture treatments led to more regular menstrual cycles and reduced testosterone levels.

You can also use Chinese Medicine in combination with your Western medical treatment. Sometimes the two together bring the best results.

PCOS is probably the most prevalent female hormonal disorder in women of reproductive age, and is a common cause of infertility but we are finding hope in a combination of Eastern and Western medicine. Consult your acupuncture specialist as well as your medical doctor to work out a treatment plan that is best for you.

Jennifer Dubowsky, LAc, is a licensed acupuncturist with a practice in downtown Chicago, Illinois, since 2002. Dubowsky earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology from University of Illinois in Chicago and her Master of Science degree in Oriental Medicine from Southwest Acupuncture College in Boulder, Colorado. During her studies, she completed an internship at the Sino-Japanese Friendship Hospital in Beijing, China. Dubowsky has researched and written articles on Chinese medicine and has given talks on the topic. She maintains a popular blog about health and Chinese medicine at Acupuncture Blog Chicago. Adventures in Chinese Medicine is her first book. You can find her at www.tcm007.com
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Ear Acupuncture Aids In Weight Loss

Ear Acupuncture Aids In Weight Loss | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it
Recent study shows that acupuncture can help in weight loss.

 

Ear acupuncture has been proven to aid in weight loss. According to a new research, putting five acupuncture needles in the outer ear may help people lose extra pounds. Ear acupuncture therapy is rooted on the theory that the outer ear represents all parts of the body. One needle will be inserted to the area for hunger and appetite while the other needles are for the various key points in the ear.

 

Researchers from Korea conducted a study that was published in the BMJ Journal Acupuncture in Medicine. This type of alternative medicine was first used in France in 1956. Dr. Paul Nogier first used this method when he observed that his patients' backache was cured when a burn on the ear has been done. From then on, he started mapping the key points of the outer ear that are linked to the different parts of the body.

For the study, the researchers compared the effectiveness of acupuncture in helping obese people lose weight. Using a randomized controlled clinical trial, they studied 91 Koreans who included 16 men and 75 women. The participants have a body mass index (BMI) of 23 and above. They were divided into three groups wherein one group received a five point acupuncture treatment, the other with one point acupuncture treatment and the last group used a control treatment.

According to the lead researcher, Sabina Lim, from the department of meridian and acupuncture in the Graduate College of Basic Korean Medical Science at Kyung Hee University in Seoul, South Korea, "If the trend we found is supported by other studies, the hunger acupuncture point is a good choice in terms of convenience. However, for patients suffering from central obesity, continuous stimulation of five acupuncture points should be used. Increased metabolic function promotes the consumption of body fat, overall, resulting in weight loss."

 

The first group had needles inserted in their acupuncture sites for shen-men, stomach, spleen, hunger and endocrine. They were left there for a week. After one week, another set of needles were inserted to the points on the other year. The process was repeated for 8 weeks. On the other hand, the second group only had one needle inserted for the course of 8 weeks. For the last group, they received the five point treatment but the needles were removed after insertion.

Also, they were asked to have a restricted diet but not a weight loss diet. They were also barred from doing additional exercise during the test. For measurements, their BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, body fat, and percentage body fat were gauged. Those who finished the trial in the five point therapy group had noticeable differences in their body mass index. The results were significantly different with 6.1% reduction in BMI for the first group, 5.7% for the one point group and no difference for the control group. Apparently, all the markers were reduced in the first group. Hence, the study showed that using five-point acupuncture in the ear can aid in weight loss and overall health.

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Repeated electroacupuncture in obese diabetic ZDF rats - YouTube

We provide a protocol for repeated electroacupuncture in male obese diabetic ZDF rats and report a hypoglycemic effect observed via blood sampling at a basel...
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Acupuncture and PCOS

Acupuncture and PCOS | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it
Australian hospitals are finally catching up with what the Chinese have long known -acupuncture is a great alternative form of pain relief.

 

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

A 2009 Swedish study found that PCOS can be relieved by the use of electro-acupuncture - where the needles are stimulated with a low-frequency current.

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Electroacupuncture: resource link

Electroacupuncture: resource link | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

CLINICAL STUDIES DATABASEIntroduction

While a major thrust of research must be to carry out new and better designed clinical trials of acupuncture, it is just as important for the information within existing clinical studies of acupuncture to be made widely available in a format that can be easily accessed by different researchers.

The purpose of this database is to present the clinical studies that have been carried out on electroacupuncture (EA) and other nontraditional acupuncture-based interventions in a succinct and accessible form.

Making this material available will enable researchers to decide rapidly which studies merit further investigation, and which not. At the moment, without going directly to the studies themselves, this is virtually impossible. My hope is that this resource will act as a springboard to further research, speed up literature review, prevent needless duplication of the considerable effort that this entails, and lead to more effective treatment.

The material was gathered as the basis for a comprehensive descriptive review in Chapter 9 of the accompanying textbook.

The database concentrates on what conditions are treated, and on which acupoints and treatment parameters are used. Statistical detail is not usually included.

How to use this database

The material in this resource can be easily accessed in a variety of ways. While the default presentation is in sections that relate closely to those used in the accompanying textbook, flexible design means you can tailor your own searches to suit your needs.

While every attempt has been made to enter the available data completely and correctly, information from some studies has not been included in full, because of lack of time or resources. Studies of manual acupuncture (MA), for example, although included for comparison, may not be entered as fully as those on EA.

Further, while the default selections on different topics are reasonably complete, you may find other relevant studies by doing your own customised search.


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Shaftesbury Clinic's curator insight, March 31, 2014 6:05 PM

This is an excellent resource for acupuncture practitioners.

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Acupuncture modulates the neuro-endocrine-immune network. [QJM. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Acupuncture modulates the neuro-endocrine-immune network. [QJM. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

QJM. 2013 Oct 17. [Epub ahead of print]

 

 

Acupuncture modulates the neuro-endocrine-immune network.

 

Ding SS1, Hong SH, Wang C, Guo Y, Wang ZK, Xu Y.Author information 

 

 

Abstract

 

As a nonspecific physical stimulation, the effect of acupuncture on diseases is produced by motivating the inherent regulatory system in the body, having the characteristics of whole regulation, dual directional regulation, etc. Modern scientific researches show that body's inherent regulatory system is neuro-endocrine-immune (NEI) network.

 

Hence, we speculate that the regulatory effect of acupuncture may be produced through its regulation of NEI network. In this article, we reviewed the recent researches about acupuncture's effect on the NEI network, to find out the evidence of acupuncture adjusting NEI network and provide some evidences for revealing the mechanism of acupuncture.

PMID: 24106314 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Auricular acupuncture in the treatment of female infertility [Gynecol Endocrinol. 1992] - PubMed - NCBI

Auricular acupuncture in the treatment of female infertility [Gynecol Endocrinol. 1992] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Gynecol Endocrinol. 1992 Sep;6(3):171-81.

 

Auricular acupuncture in the treatment of female infertility.

 

Gerhard I1, Postneek F.Author information 

 

Abstract

 

Following a complete gynecologic--endocrinologic workup, 45 infertile women suffering from oligoamenorrhea (n = 27) or luteal insufficiency (n = 18) were treated with auricular acupuncture. Results were compared to those of 45 women who received hormone treatment. Both groups were matched for age, duration of infertility, body mass index, previous pregnancies, menstrual cycle and tubal patency. Women treated with acupuncture had 22 pregnancies, 11 after acupuncture, four spontaneously, and seven after appropriate medication. Women treated with hormones had 20 pregnancies, five spontaneously, and 15 in response to therapy. Four women of each group had abortions.

 

Endometriosis (normal menstrual cycles) was seen in 35% (38%) of the women of each group who failed to respond to therapy with pregnancy. Only 4% of the women who responded to acupuncture or hormone treatment with a pregnancy had endometriosis, and 7% had normal cycles.

 

In addition, women who continued to be infertile after hormone therapy had higher body mass indices and testosterone values than the therapy responders from this group. Women who became pregnant after acupuncture suffered more often from menstrual abnormalities and luteal insufficiency with lower estrogen, thyrotropin (TSH) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations than the women who achieved pregnancy after hormone treatment. Although the pregnancy rate was similar for both groups, eumenorrheic women treated with acupuncture had adnexitis, endometriosis, out-of-phase endometria and reduced postcoital tests more often than those receiving hormones.

 

Twelve of the 27 women (44%) with menstrual irregularities remained infertile after therapy with acupuncture compared to 15 of the 27 (56%) controls treated with hormones, even though hormone disorders were more pronounced in the acupuncture group. Side-effects were observed only during hormone treatment. Various disorders of the autonomic nervous system normalized during acupuncture. Based on our data, auricular acupuncture seems to offer a valuable alternative therapy for female infertility due to hormone disorders.

 

PMID: 1442162 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Neuroendocrine mechanisms of acupuncture in the treatment of hypertension [Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI

Neuroendocrine mechanisms of acupuncture in the treatment of hypertension [Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012;2012:878673. doi: 10.1155/2012/878673. Epub 2011 Dec 18.

 

Neuroendocrine mechanisms of acupuncture in the treatment of hypertension

 

.Zhou W1, Longhurst JC.Author information 

 

Abstract

 

Hypertension affects approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. Pharmacological therapy has not been perfected and often is associated with adverse side effects. Acupuncture is used as an adjunctive treatment for a number of cardiovascular diseases like hypertension. It has long been established that the two major contributors to systemic hypertension are the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and chronic activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Recent evidence indicates that in some models of cardiovascular disease, blockade of AT1 receptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM) reduces sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure, suggesting that overactivity of the angiotensin system in this nucleus may play a role in the maintenance of hypertension.

 

Our experimental studies have shown that electroacupuncture stimulation activates neurons in the arcuate nucleus, ventrolateral gray, and nucleus raphe to inhibit the neural activity in the rVLM in a model of visceral reflex stimulation-induced hypertension. This paper will discuss current knowledge of the effects of acupuncture on central nervous system and how they contribute to regulation of acupuncture on the endocrine system to provide a perspective on the future of treatment of hypertension with this ancient technique.

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Menopause-related symptoms: traditional Chinese medicine vs hormone therapy [Altern Ther Health Med. 2011 Jul-Aug] - PubMed - NCBI

Menopause-related symptoms: traditional Chinese medicine vs hormone therapy  [Altern Ther Health Med. 2011 Jul-Aug] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Altern Ther Health Med. 2011 Jul-Aug;17(4):48-53.

 

Menopause-related symptoms: traditional Chinese medicine vs hormone therapy.

 

Azizi H1, Feng Liu Y, Du L, Hua Wang C, Bahrami-Taghanaki H, Ollah Esmaily H, Azizi H, Ou Xue X.Author information AbstractOBJECTIVE:

 

 

To compare the therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM), acupuncture, and hormone therapy on menopause- related symptoms of peri- and postmenopausal women.

 

STUDY DESIGN:

Fifty-seven Chinese women completed 2 months of treatment with either CHM (5 g twice daily, n = 22), acupuncture plus CHM (Kun Bao Wan) 5 g twice daily plus sessions of acupuncture, n = 20), or hormone therapy (n = 15).

 

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Kupperman index score, levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol, and the number of symptoms before and after treatment were the main outcome measures.

 

RESULTS:

CHM, acupuncture plus CHM, and hormone therapy significantly decreased Kupperman score (P < .001 in each group) and number of symptoms (P < .05). The mean difference in Kupperman score between baseline and 2 months among the three groups was significantly varied (P = .02). The difference was only between acupuncture plus CHM and CHM with significantly better results by acupuncture plus CHM. Acupuncture plus CHM, as well as hormone therapy, significantly reduced the level of FSH (P < .05), but CHM alone didn't cause any significant decrease in FSH levels (P > .05). The mean difference in the level of FSH between baseline and 2 months among the three groups was significantly different (P = .02). This difference was only between CHM and hormone therapy with significantly better results by hormone therapy. The three treatments didn't make any significant increase in the level of E2 (P > .05).

 

CONCLUSION:

application of the combination of Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture proved as effective as hormone therapy in the treatment of menopause-related symptoms, and it achieved better outcomes than herbal medicine alone.

PMID: 22314633 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Neuroendocrine Mechanisms of Acupuncture

Neuroendocrine Mechanisms of Acupuncture | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Neuroendocrine Mechanisms of Acupuncture

 

Fengxia Liang, Rui Chen, and Edwin L. Cooper

 

Additional article information

 

Acupuncture is currently gaining popularity worldwide as a “complementary” or “alternative therapy.” The underlying mechanisms of acupuncture in general require further investigation to be delineated, although acupuncture therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in several clinical areas. Recently, there is a growing focus on the critical role of the brain and a need to explain how acupuncture affects endocrine function through the CNS (central nervous system). This special issue was developed to stimulate the continuing efforts in defining and promoting the neuroendocrine mechanism of acupuncture.

 

This special issue contains thirteen papers, of which five are related to analgesic effect of acupuncture, and two cover opiate addiction. There are single papers focusing on cardiac, Parkinson's disease, hot flashes, and hypertension. Another deals with brain-modulated effect of auricular acupressure. Finally, one explores the impairments of spatial memory.

“Effects of electroacupuncture on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-related signaling pathway in the spinal cord of normal rats” by H.-N. Kim provides evidence that calcium influx by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation may play an important role in EA analgesia of normal rats through modulation of the phosphorylation of spinal phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). “Changes in cytokine expression after electroacupuncture in neuropathic rats” by M. H. Cha revealed that EA reduced the levels of proinflammtory cytokines elevated after nerve injury in peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglia (DRG).

 

“Effects of electroacupuncture at BL60 on formalin-induced pain in rats” by K.-H. Chang showed the effect of EA in relieving inflammatory pain and the possible involved mechanism. Furthermore, “Effect of electroacupuncture on activation of p38MAPK in spinal dorsal horn in rats with complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain” by Y. Liang indicated that anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of EA might be associated with its inhibition of spinal p38 MAPK activation and thereby provide a potential mechanism for the treatment of inflammatory pain by EA.

 

On the other hand, “Does acupuncture needling induce analgesic effects comparable to diffuse noxious inhibitory controls?” by J. Schliessbach showed that acupuncture at low pain stimulus intensity did not produce a DNIC-like effect comparable to a classical, painful DNIC-test, indicating that the penetration of an acupuncture needle seems not to induce an analgesic effect mainly mediated by DNIC.

 

“Acupuncture for the treatment of opiate addiction”by J. G. Lin is a systematic review of randomized clinical trials which applied acupuncture for treating opiate addiction and analysed the possible mechanism underlying the effect of acupuncture. “Electroacupuncture suppresses discrete cue-evoked heroin-seeking and Fos protein expression in the nucleus accumbens core in rats”

 

[...]

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Cardiovascular and endocrine effects of acupuncture in hypertensive patients [Clin Exp Hypertens. 1997] - PubMed - NCBI

Cardiovascular and endocrine effects of acupuncture in hypertensive patients [Clin Exp Hypertens. 1997] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Clin Exp Hypertens. 1997 Oct;19(7):1047-63.

 

Cardiovascular and endocrine effects of acupuncture in hypertensive patients

 

.Chiu YJ1, Chi A, Reid IA.Author information 

 

Abstract

It has been reported that acupuncture can decrease blood pressure in patients with hypertension, possibly by an endocrine mechanism. T

 

he aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acupuncture on arterial blood pressure and the secretion of renin, vasopressin and cortisol in hypertensive patients. Acupuncture was performed in fifty untreated essential hypertensive patients resting in the supine position.

 

Thirty min after acupuncture there were decreases in systolic pressure from 169 +/- 2 to 151 +/- 2 mm Hg, diastolic pressure from 107 +/- 1 to 96 +/- 1 mm Hg, and heart rate from 77 +/- 2 to 72 +/- 2 bpm (P < 0.01). Plasma renin activity decreased from 1.7 +/- 0.4 to 1.1 +/- 0.2 ng/ml/2h (P < 0.01), but there were no significant changes in plasma vasopressin or cortisol concentrations.

 

These results confirm that acupuncture decreases blood pressure in hypertensive patients, and suggest that the decrease results, at least in part, from a decrease in renin secretion.

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Development Program: Acupuncture and neuro-endocrine function research

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Development Program: Acupuncture and neuro-endocrine function research | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Conclusions

 

Acupuncture as a therapeutic intervention is widely practiced in the United States. There have been many studies of its potential usefulness. However, many of these studies provide equivocal results because of design, sample size, and other factors. The issue is further complicated by inherent difficulties in the use of appropriate controls, such as placebo and sham acupuncture groups.

 

However, promising results have emerged, for example, efficacy of acupuncture in adult post-operative and chemotherapy nausea and vomiting and in postoperative dental pain. There are other situations such as addiction, stroke rehabilitation, headache, menstrual cramps, tennis elbow, fibromyalgia, myofascial pain, osteoarthritis, low back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and asthma for which acupuncture may be useful as an adjunct treatment or an acceptable alternative or be included in a comprehensive management program.

 

Further research is likely to uncover additional areas where acupuncture interventions will be useful.

 

Findings from basic research have begun to elucidate the mechanisms of action of acupuncture, including the release of opioids and other peptides in the central nervous system and the periphery and changes in neuroendocrine function. Although much needs to be accomplished, the emergence of plausible mechanisms for the therapeutic effects of acupuncture is encouraging.

 

The introduction of acupuncture into the choice of treatment modalities readily available to the public is in its early stages. Issues of training, licensure, and reimbursement remain to be clarified. There is sufficient evidence, however, of its potential value to conventional medicine to encourage further studies.

 

There is sufficient evidence of acupuncture's value to expand its use into conventional medicine and to encourage further studies of its physiology and clinical value.

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Effects of Acupuncture on Leucopenia, Neutropenia, NK, and B Cells in Cancer Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study

Effects of Acupuncture on Leucopenia, Neutropenia, NK, and B Cells in Cancer Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (eCAM) is an international, peer-reviewed journal that seeks to understand the sources and to encourage rigorous research in this new, yet ancient world of complementary and alternative medicine.

 

Chemotherapy is one of most significant therapeutic approaches to cancer. Immune system functional state is considered a major prognostic and predictive impact on the success of chemotherapy and it has an important role on patients’ psychoemotional state and quality of life. In Chinese medicine, chemotherapy is understood as “toxic cold” that may induce a progressive hypofunctional state of immune system, thus compromising the fast recovery of immunity during chemotherapy. In this study, we performed a standardized acupuncture and moxibustion protocol to enhance immunity in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and to assess if the improvement of immunity status correlates with a better psychoemotional state and quality of life.

 

Our pilot study suggests that acupuncture and moxibustion may (1) stimulate anticancer immunity, (2) promote a myeloprotective effect, (3) improve the psychoemotional status and quality of life, and (4) minimize chemotherapy side effects.

This study protocol proved to be feasible and safe for CRC patients.

A larger and long-term acupuncture trial is needed to clarify acupuncture’s immunomodulatory effects in CRC. If this effect is ultimately established, then this treatment may serve as a possible complementary therapy for CRC treatment and possibly contribute to improving patients’ prognosis and quality of life.

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Understanding Fertility – an Acupuncturist's View

Understanding Fertility – an Acupuncturist's View | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Acupuncture has a solid reputation for supporting fertility for both men and women. So much so that many mainstream fertility clinics recommend and offer acupuncture.  This article considers what optimal fertile health looks like through the Chinese medicine lens and how divergences from this can give helpful clues to an acupuncturist to help formulate a diagnosis and prepare a treatment plan and inform dietary tips or lifestyle modifications that can help to improve fertility.

Traditional Acupuncture is a branch of Chinese medicine, which is an excellent model to use to understand fertility. Chinese medicine is based on very simple principles that can be combined and interwoven to understand the very complex reality of an individual’s fertility and broader health.

The Yin and Yang of the Menstrual cycle

One of these sets of principles is the ebb and flow of Yin and Yang. This elegantly mirrors the different stages of the menstrual cycle. Yin is still and quiet, nurturing and moistening – it is the preparation phase. Yang is more dynamic and warming, it is the active growing phase.

The Yin phase equates to the oestrogen dominated half of the cycle prior to ovulation. It is the first half of the cycle, and is preparing for ovulation by first shedding the endometrial layer from the previous cycle (the period), building the new layer for an embryo to implant into and ripening the follicles. It is responsible for governing the cervical secretions which need to be rich in potassium to fuel the sperm and loose and slippery for the sperm to swim through easily. The middle of the cycle is dedicated to ovulation when the follicle ruptures and the egg is released. The next phase is the Yang phase, the progesterone dominated half of the cycle. It dries up mucosal secretions to allow smooth passage the fertilized zygote and aid implantation. It facilitates the release of nutrients from the endometrial layer to nourish the embryo. If there is no conception and implantation, Yang is the motive force that builds to get the next period started to begin the new cycle.

Observing the Menstrual Cycle

A very useful fertility to tool to view the health of the menstrual cycle is charting. It can help a couple to know when the most fertile time is, and provide useful information for the acupuncture practitioner to track not only the length of the menstrual cycle, but also the length of the Yin/oestrogen phase and the Yang/progesterone phase. Charting is done based on your Basal Body Temperature (taken on waking at the same time each morning) and recorded on a chart. Below is a typical temperature chart.

 

It shows that in the first half of a typical cycle the temperature is lower than the second half. It shows that there is a dip in body temperature, a result of an oestrogen surge just in advance of ovulation. Around this time you should also see an increase in cervical mucous. Shortly after ovulation at the start of the Yang phase, there should be a spike in temperature, which should stay relatively constant for the remaining half of the cycle.

Charting is not for everyone, it does take dedication to taking the temperature every morning and paying very close attention to the cycle. However, there are other signs and symptoms that can be very informative – details that may not be considered as particularly relevant by a Western medical doctor – but can provide insightful clues into why a couple may be having difficulty conceiving.

Examples of signs and symptoms of particular relevance are: when and how your period starts and finishes; colour of blood; pain at any time during your cycle; headaches; cervical secretions; sleeplessness; mood. These signs and symptoms and temperature fluctuations help to understand the how the balance of Yin and Yang is in the individual and therefore where the focus of treatment should be.

For example, the first half of the cycle is very susceptible to emotional strain and can cause early ovulation (i.e. before day 14). Emotional strain can cause imbalances resulting in a slightly raised temperature, irritability and a degree of insomnia. Early ovulation can mean that eggs are being released before they are fully ripe and therefore either might not be fertilized or may not implant well if they are fertilized. Acupuncture treatment in this instance would focus on regulating your temperature, calming the mind and reducing stress.

Another example can be where the temperature is too low in the second half of the cycle and this can cause poor implantation or early miscarriage. In this instance treatment would focus on raising temperatures and nourishing the endometrial layer.

Each individual woman’s cycle is different and as such each treatment is personalized for whatever your particular set of circumstances might be. Advice around observing the fluctuations in the menstrual will help to maximize chances of conception and can be provided around diet and lifestyle for each individual’s health.

Male Factor

Acupuncture is not just used to support female fertility but male as well. There are a variety of signs and symptoms that can help to identify areas of treatment to focus on for men too. For example, men who experience feelings of coldness, fatigue and reduced sexual desire may well have sperm with low motility. In this case, treatment would focus on supporting the Yang aspect of a man’s health and advice around eating habits may be appropriate.

Research

There has been research into how acupuncture can help support fertility naturally.  Showing that it can:

be effective in regulating the hormones involved in fertility (Jin 2009, Huang 2009).reduce the stress response, also known as “the fight or flight response” which can have a significant impact on the function of the reproductive organs and can inhibit ovulation (Magarelli 2008, Anderson 2007 ).increase blood flow to reproductive organs – improving the supplying of oxygen and nutrients to developing eggs in the ovaries and improve the blood supply to the uterus, thus making a healthier, thicker endometrial layer – which improves chances of successful implantation. (Stener-Victorin 2006, Lim 2010, Liu 2008)work to counteract the effects of PCOS – balancing hormone levels, increasing ovulation and warming the uterus to improve blastocyst implantation (Stener-Victorin 2000, 2008, 2009, Zhang 2009.can help to improve sperm maturation (Crimmel 2001), lower scrotal temperature (Siterman 2009), improving blood supply to the reproductive organs (Komori 2009).

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Infertility and Acupuncture | American Pregnancy Association

Infertility and Acupuncture | American Pregnancy Association | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Acupuncture is the insertion of ultra-thin, sterile needles into specific acupuncture points on the body which reside on channels or meridians; these are pathways in both the exterior and interior of the body. These points, when needled, can regulate the way in which the body functions. Acupuncture helps by addressing problems that affect fertility such as an under-functioning thyroid (hypothyroidism) or over-functioning thyroid (hyperthyroidism).

Find an Acupuncturist in Your Area

Can Acupuncture Be Used To Treat Infertility?

Acupuncture, frequently combined with herbal medicine, has been used for centuries to treat some but not all causes of infertility. For example, acupuncture and herbs will not work to address tubal adhesions which can occur as a result of pelvic inflammatory disease orendometriosis. However, in this situation, an individual could still benefit from acupuncture and herbs because of the potential effect of improved ovarian and follicular function. Additionally, acupuncture can increase blood flow to the endometrium, helping to facilitate a thick, rich lining.

When Should Acupuncture Treatment Begin?

Acupuncture is similar to physical therapy in that it is a process-oriented method of medical intervention. It is better to do more than less. Patients are commonly treated for three to four months before progressing to insemination, in vitro fertilization (IVF), or donor-egg transfer. This pacing of treatment seems to have a therapeutic effect.

In a study by Stener-Victorin et al from the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology Fertility Centre, Scandinavia and University of Gothenburg, women are encouraged to receive acupuncture treatments pre and post embryo transfer. Clinical observations from the Berkley Center for Reproductive Wellness suggest that the most effective fertility treatments involve a combination of acupuncture, herbal medicine, and traditional medicine. However, conception occasionally occurs when acupuncture and herbal medicines are used without traditional medical interventions.

Infertility And Acupuncture: When Should I Stop?

Typically most miscarriages occur within the first three months of pregnancy. Consequently, treatment of patients may often last through week twelve to help prevent miscarriage.

Are The Acupuncture Points Different After An Insemination, IVF,< Or Donor-Egg Transfer Than Before?

Acupuncturists should not place needles in the abdomino-pelvic area after insemination or transfer. There are 6 contraindicated acupuncture points which should be avoided when the patient is pregnant or pregnancy is suspected. These include Gallbladder 21, Stomach 12, Large Intestine 4, Spleen 6, Bladder 60, Bladder 67 and any points on the lower abdomen.

What Are The Risks Of Using Acupuncture With Infertility?

There are minimal risks in using acupuncture for fertility treatment. The risk of miscarriage may increase if incorrect acupuncture points are used during pregnancy. This is one reason why those choosing to include acupuncture in their treatment regimen should only be treated by an acupuncturist who specializes in treating fertility disorders. Acupuncture is generally safe regardless of a person’s medical history.

Infertility And Acupuncture: Who Make Up Typical Patients?

Acupuncture can be used to treat any type of fertility disorder including spasmed tubes. Spasmed tubes are often de-spasmed with acupuncture, though blocked tubes will not respond to acupuncture. Acupuncture is often combined with herbal remedies to treat elevated follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), repeated pregnancy loss, unexplained (idiopathic) infertility, luteal phase defect, hyperprolactinemia (when not caused by a prolactinoma), polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) with annovulatory cycles, and male factor including men affected with sperm-DNA-fragmentation.

Is Acupuncture A Licensed Profession?

In most states acupuncture is a licensed profession. You can visit www.nccaom.org to find a licensed and Board certified acupuncturist in your area. However, it is important to understand that being licensed and Board certified does not guarantee expertise in reproductive disorders.

Last Updated: 04/2013
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Cardiovascular and Endocrine Effects of Acupuncture in Hypertensive Patients, Clinical and Experimental Hypertension, Informa Healthcare

Cardiovascular and Endocrine Effects of Acupuncture in Hypertensive Patients, Clinical and Experimental Hypertension, Informa Healthcare | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Clinical and Experimental Hypertension 

Original Article

Cardiovascular and Endocrine Effects ofAcupuncture in Hypertensive Patients

 

1997, Vol. 19, No. 7 , Pages 1047-1063PDF (629 KB)PDF Plus (224 KB)ReprintsPermissionsYeong Jen Chiu1, Andrew Chi2 and Ian A. Reid11Y. J. Chiu General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan2Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA

 

 

It has been reported that acupuncture can decrease blood pressure in patients with hypertension, possibly by an endocrine mechanism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects ofacupuncture on arterial blood pressure and the secretion of renin, vasopressin and cortisol in hypertensive patients. Acupuncture was performed in fifty untreated essential hypertensive patients resting in the supine position. Thirty min after acupuncture there were decreases in systolic pressure from 169 ± 2 to 151 ± 2 mm Hg, diastolic pressure from 107 ± 1 to 96 ± 1 mm Hg, and heart rate from 77 ± 2 to 72 ± 2 bpm (P<0.01). Plasma renin activity decreased from 1.7 ± 0.4 to 1.1 ± 0.2 ng/ml/2h (P<0.01), but there were no significant changes in plasma vasopressin or cortisol concentrations. These results confirm that acupuncture decreases blood pressure in hypertensive patients, and suggest that the decrease results, at least in part, from a decrease in renin secretion.

Keywordsacupuncture, renin, vasopressin, cortisol, blood pressure, hypertension

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Acupuncture Might be the Answer for Hot Flashes | Medindia

Acupuncture Might be the Answer for Hot Flashes | Medindia | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it
In the 2,500+ years that have passed since acupuncture was first used by the ancient Chinese.

 

It has been used to treat a number of physical, mental and emotional conditions including nausea and vomiting, stroke rehabilitation, headaches, menstrual cramps, asthma, carpal tunnel, fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis, to name just a few. 

Now, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials which is being published this month in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), indicates that acupuncture can affect the severity and frequency of hot flashes for women in natural menopause. An extensive search of previous studies evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture uncovered 104 relevant students, of which 12 studies with 869 participants met the specified inclusion criteria to be included in this current study. 

While the studies provided inconsistent findings on the effects of acupuncture on other menopause-related symptoms such as sleep problems, mood disturbances and sexual problems, they did conclude that acupuncture positively impacted both the frequency and severity of hot flashes. Women experiencing natural menopause and aged between 40 and 60 years were included in the analysis, which evaluated the effects of various forms of acupuncture, including traditional Chinese medicine acupuncture (TCMA), acupressure, electroacupuncture, laser acupuncture and ear acupuncture. 

Interestingly, neither the effect on hot flash frequency or severity appeared to be linked to the number of treatment doses, number of sessions or duration of treatment. However, the findings showed that sham acupuncture could induce a treatment effect comparable with that of true acupuncture for the reduction of hot flash frequency. The effects on hot flashes were shown to be maintained for as long as three months. 

Although the study stopped short of explaining the exact mechanism underlying the effects of acupuncture on hot flashes, a theory was proposed to suggest that acupuncture caused a reduction in the concentration of β-endorphin in the hypothalamus, resulting from low concentrations of estrogen. These lower levels could trigger the release of CGRP, which affects thermoregulation. 

"More than anything, this review indicates that there is still much to be learned relative to the causes and treatments of menopausal hot flashes," says NAMS executive director Margery Gass, MD. "The review suggests that acupuncture may be an effective alternative for reducing hot flashes, especially for those women seeking non- pharmacologic therapies."A recent review indicated that approximately half of women experiencing menopause-associated symptoms use complementary and alternative medicine therapy, instead of pharmacologic therapies, for managing their menopausal symptoms.

Read more: Acupuncture Might be the Answer for Hot Flashes http://www.medindia.net/news/acupuncture-might-be-the-answer-for-hot-flashes-138741-1.htm#ixzz3NKHd2DN7

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Acupuncture and responses of immunologic and endocrine markers during competition. [Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003] - PubMed - NCBI

Acupuncture and responses of immunologic and endocrine markers during competition. [Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Aug;35(8):1296-302.

 

Acupuncture and responses of immunologic and endocrine markers during competition.

 

Akimoto T1, Nakahori C, Aizawa K, Kimura F, Fukubayashi T, Kono I.Author information AbstractINTRODUCTION:

 

Acupuncture is used to modulate the physical well-being of athletes in Asian countries. However, there is little information on the immediate effects of acupuncture treatment on physiological or psychological responses to exercise.

 

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acupuncture treatment on the physical well-being of elite female soccer players during a competition period.

 

METHODS:

Subjects were divided into two groups: those who received acupuncture treatment (18.1 +/- 2.3 yr [+/-SD], N = 9) and a control group (17.7 +/- 2.8 yr, N = 12). In the treatment group, acupuncture stimulus was applied at LI 4 (Goukoku), ST 36 (Ashi-sanri) for 20 min, and ST 6 (Kyosya), LU 6 (Ko-sai) points for 15 min 4 h after the game every night during the competition period. The measured parameters included salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) level, cortisol level in saliva, subjective rating of physical well-being, and profile of mood states (POMS).

 

RESULTS:

The following were the main results: 1). Exercise-induced decrease of salivary SIgA and increase of salivary cortisol were inhibited by acupuncture. 2). Acupuncture improved subjective rating of muscle tension and fatigue. 3). The POMS score was modulated by acupuncture.

 

CONCLUSION:

These results support the effectiveness of acupuncture for physical and mental well-being of athletes.

PMID: 12900681 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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[The effect of acupuncture on endocrine regulation in hypertensive patients]. [Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1991 Jan-Feb] - PubMed - NCBI

[The effect of acupuncture on endocrine regulation in hypertensive patients]. [Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1991 Jan-Feb] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 1991 Jan-Feb;(1):29-32.

 

[The effect of acupuncture on endocrine regulation in hypertensive patients].

 

[Article in Russian]Bobkova AS, Gaponiuk PIa, Korovkina EG, Sherkovina TIu, Leonova MV.

 

Abstract

 

Thirty-five stage I-II essential hypertension subjects aged 25-63 were examined after the 1st and 10th acupuncture to clarify the effect of a single procedure and a course of acupuncture treatment on blood ACTH, STH, TTH, beta-endorphine, neurotensin, thyroxine, aldosterone, hydrocortisone and plasma renin activity. The hormonal spectrum was determined by radioimmunoassay using special kits.

 

The blood was obtained before acupuncture, 5 min after introduction of the needles, immediately and 30 min after their removal. It is shown that acupuncture-related decline of arterial pressure occurs in participation of pituitary and adrenal hormones as well as polypeptides beta-endorphine and neurotensin.

 

PMID: 1646516 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]  

 

 

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Influence of acupuncture on leptin, ghrelin, insulin and cholecystokinin in obese women: a randomised, sham-controlled preliminary trial. [Acupunct Med. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI

Influence of acupuncture on leptin, ghrelin, insulin and cholecystokinin in obese women: a randomised, sham-controlled preliminary trial.  [Acupunct Med. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Acupunct Med. 2012 Sep;30(3):203-7. doi: 10.1136/acupmed-2012-010127. Epub 2012 Jun 22.

 

Influence of acupuncture on leptin, ghrelin, insulin and cholecystokinin in obese women: a randomised, sham-controlled preliminary trial.

 

Güçel F1, Bahar B, Demirtas C, Mit S, Cevik C.Author information 

 

AbstractBACKGROUND:

 

Obesity is an energy balance problem caused by overeating. Obesity treatment includes diet, exercise, behaviour treatment, pharmacotherapy and surgery; in addition, acupuncture is also an option.

 

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the effect of acupuncture on weight loss and whether a brief acupuncture treatment of 5 weeks can change circulating levels of leptin, ghrelin, insulin and cholecystokinin (CCK) in obese women.

 

METHODS:

40 women with a body mass index (BMI)>30 kg/m(2) were equally randomised to either an acupuncture group or a sham (non-penetrating) acupuncture group and received treatment at LI4, HT7, ST36, ST44 and SP6 bilaterally. Both groups had two sessions of 20 min/week for a total of 10 sessions. Serum insulin, leptin, plasma ghrelin and CCK levels were measured by ELISA.

 

RESULTS:

Acupuncture treatment decreased insulin and leptin levels and induced weight loss, together with a decrease in BMI compared with sham acupuncture. Furthermore, between-group analyses demonstrated increases in plasma ghrelin and CCK levels in subjects who received acupuncture treatment.

 

CONCLUSION:

These findings suggest that acupuncture may help to regulate weight owing to its beneficial effects on hormones such as insulin, leptin, ghrelin and CCK in obese subjects even after a few weeks of treatment.

PMID: 22729015 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

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Experimental study on acupuncture activating the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in hypothalamus. [J Tradit Chin Med. 2010] - PubMed - NCBI

Experimental study on acupuncture activating the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in hypothalamus.  [J Tradit Chin Med. 2010] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

J Tradit Chin Med. 2010 Mar;30(1):30-9.

 

Experimental study on acupuncture activating the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in hypothalamus.

 

Wang SJ1, Zhu B, Ren XX, Tan LH.

Author information 


Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To probe into the most effective site, extra-ordinary point, acupoint and channel for regulating reproductive endocrine function by means of the study on acupuncture activating the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons (GnRH) in hypothalamus.

 

METHODS:

Female SD rats of reproductive age were used, and the in vivo study on GnRH neurons in hypothalamus was made with mimic sexual stimulation and feedback regulation. The neuron-activating effects of the acupoints on the channels pertaining to the zang- and fu-organs related with reproductive endocrine and the extra-ordinary points in different regions were studied using the discharge of the neuron as index, and then the neurons were labeled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP).

 

RESULTS:

Acupuncture was given at two acupoints each on the three yin channels of foot, the three yang channels of foot, the Conception Vessel and the Governor Vessel. The order of the mean increasing percentage in the hypothalamic GnRH neuron electric activity was: the Gallbladder Channel > the Spleen Channel > the Stomach Channel/the Bladder Channel/the Conception Vessel > the Liver Channel > the Kidney Channel > the Governor Vessel; for different acupoints, it was: Guanyuan (CV 4) > Sanyinjiao (SP 6) > Zusanli (ST 36) > Daimai (GB 26)/Yanglingquan (GB 34) > Shenshu (BL 23) > Weizhong (BL 40) > Yaoyangguan (GV 3)/Liangmen (ST 21)/Fujie (SP 14) > Qimen (LR 14)/Yingu (KI 10) > Tangzhong (CV 17)/Zhiyang (GV 9); for different positions, it was: the lower abdominal part/the lower limb part > the thoracodorsal part; for the extra-ordinary points, it was: Zigong (EX-CA1) > Dannang (EX-LE6)/Yaoyan (EX-B7) > Baichongwo (EX-LE3)/Qianzheng > Jingbi/Bizhong/Taiyang (EX-HN5) > Erbai (EX-UE2)/ Dingchun; and for the distribution sites of the extra-ordinary points: lower abdominal region > the lower limb region > the craniofacial region > the upper limb region/the thoracodorsal region.

 

CONCLUSION:

For regulating the reproductive endocrine function, the acupoints located at the same neural segment with the reproductive organ should be selected as the main points, and it is necessary to combine with syndrome differentiation of the viscera and channels.

PMID: 20397460 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free full text

 

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Acupuncture in the Treatment of Hypertension, Neuroendocrine Mechanisms

Acupuncture in the Treatment of Hypertension, Neuroendocrine Mechanisms | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Neuroendocrine Mechanisms of Acupuncture in the Treatment of Hypertension

 

Wei Zhou and John C. Longhurst

 

Additional article information

 

Abstract

 

Hypertension affects approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. Pharmacological therapy has not been perfected and often is associated with adverse side effects. Acupuncture is used as an adjunctive treatment for a number of cardiovascular diseases like hypertension. It has long been established that the two major contributors to systemic hypertension are the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and chronic activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Recent evidence indicates that in some models of cardiovascular disease, blockade of AT1 receptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM) reduces sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure, suggesting that overactivity of the angiotensin system in this nucleus may play a role in the maintenance of hypertension. Our experimental studies have shown that electroacupuncture stimulation activates neurons in the arcuate nucleus, ventrolateral gray, and nucleus raphe to inhibit the neural activity in the rVLM in a model of visceral reflex stimulation-induced hypertension. This paper will discuss current knowledge of the effects of acupuncture on central nervous system and how they contribute to regulation of acupuncture on the endocrine system to provide a perspective on the future of treatment of hypertension with this ancient technique.

 

1. Introduction

Hypertension affects approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide [1]. Hypertension is the most common chronic disorder in the United States, affecting 29% of the adult population [1]. The prevalence of this disorder increases with age; for normotensive middle-aged adults in the US, the lifetime risk of developing hypertension approaches 90% [2]. Although a number of treatment strategies have been developed for this disease, treatment has not been perfected and often is associated with adverse side effects.

 

Hypertension is the final outcome of a complex interaction between genetic and environment factors that act on physiological systems involved in blood pressure (BP) regulation (i.e., those that influence intravascular fluid volume, myocardial contractility and vascular tone) [3]. Evidence suggests that increased sympathetic neural activity plays a role in causing hypertension in some subjects who have a genetic tendency toward increased sympathetic activity as a result of repetitive psychogenic stress, obesity, or high sodium intake [3]. An important hypothesis in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension involves an interaction between high dietary sodium intake and defects in renal sodium excretion, which can be influenced by sympathetic neural activity and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system [3]. Enhanced sympathetic activity increases the secretion of renin and angiotensin. Angiotensin II enhances renal tubular sodium reabsorption directly and indirectly through increased release of aldosterone.

 

 

[...]

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Effect of abdominal acupuncture therapy on the endocrine and metabolism in obesity-type polycystic ovarian syndrome patients].[Article in Chinese [Zhen Ci Yan Jiu. 2010] - PubMed - NCBI

Effect of abdominal acupuncture therapy on the endocrine and metabolism in obesity-type polycystic ovarian syndrome patients].[Article in Chinese  [Zhen Ci Yan Jiu. 2010] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Zhen Ci Yan Jiu. 2010 Aug;35(4):298-302.

 

[Effect of abdominal acupuncture therapy on the endocrine and metabolism in obesity-type polycystic ovarian syndrome patients]

 

.[Article in Chinese]Lai MH1, Ma HX, Yao H, Liu H, Song XH, Huang WY, Wu XK.Author information 

 

Abstract

 

OBJECTIVE:

To observe the effect of abdominal acupuncture on the endocrine and metabolic level in obesity-type polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) patients.

 

METHODS:

Eighty-six PCOS patients were randomly and equally divided into medication group and abdominal acupuncture group. Patients of medication group were treated with metformin (250 mg/time, t.i. d. in the 1st week, and 500 mg/time, t.i.d. thereafter) for 6 months,and those of abdominal acupuncture group were treated by abdominal acupuncture [Zhongwan (CV 12), Liangmen (ST 21), etc., once daily for 6 months]. Changes of the body height, body Mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), Ferriman-Galleey score (FGS), menstrual frequency (MF) and ovarian volume (OV) were determined. Serum luteotrophic hormone (LH), free testosterone (T), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) contents were detected with radioimmunoassay. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting insulin (FIN), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), Homa insulin resistance index (IRI) were detected with chromatometry respectively.

 

RESULTS:

After the treatment, BMI, WHR, FGS and OV were reduced significantly in both medication and abdominal acupuncture groups (P < 0.05), while MF of the two groups increased evidently (P < 0.05), and the effects of abdominal acupuncture group were significantly superior to those of medication group in down-regulating BMI, WHR and upregulating MF (P < 0.05). Regarding the reproductive hormons, serum LH, LH/FSH and T levels in the two groups decreased significantly (P< 0.05), and the effect of abdominal acupuncture was superior to that of medication group in reducing serum T level (P < 0.05). Following the treatment, FBG, BG and FIN and INS contents 2 h after meal,and Homa IR in both medication and abdominal acupuncture groups all decreased considerably (P < 0.05), but without significant differences between them (P > 0.05). Regarding the blood lipid levels after the treatment, serum TC, TG, and LDL-C levels of the two groups decreased significantly (P < 0.05), while serum HDL-C level increased remarkably (P<0.05), without significant differences between the two groups in these indexes (P > 0.05).

 

CONCLUSION:

Abdominal acupuncture treatment can improve the endocrine and metabolic function of patients with obesity-type PCOS

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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[Endocrinology and acupuncture]. [Minerva Med. 1983] - PubMed - NCBI

[Endocrinology and acupuncture]. [Minerva Med. 1983] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and the endocrine system; hormones | Scoop.it

Minerva Med. 1983 Nov 3;74(42):2513-9.[Endocrinology and acupuncture].[Article in Italian]Zicari N, Ricciotti F, Zicari D.Abstract

 

The endocrine action of several applications of acupuncture is discussed. These hormonal actions are well known to present-day medicine. A research on the action of 6 RP on the estrogen hormones was carried out.

 

Doses were given of plasmatic 17-beta-estradiol before and after the application of 6 RP. A Radioimmunologic Assay (RIA) was performed and the research conducted using a double blind method. The results lead to believe that the application of 6 RP causes the rise of the plasmatic rate of 17-beta-estradiol.

 

PMID: 6657107 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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