Acupuncture and dermatology
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Acupuncture compared to oral antihistamine for type I hypersensitivity itch and skin response in adults with atopic dermatitis – a patient and examiner blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, cros...

Acupuncture compared to oral antihistamine for type I hypersensitivity itch and skin response in adults with atopic dermatitis – a patient and examiner blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, cros... | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Allergy. Author manuscript; available in PMC Apr 1, 2013. Published in final edited form as:Allergy. Apr 2012; 67(4): 566–573.Published online Feb 8, 2012. doi:  10.1111/j.1398-9995.2012.02789.xPMCID: PMC3303983NIHMSID: NIHMS347294Acupuncture compared to oral antihistamine for type I hypersensitivity itch and skin response in adults with atopic dermatitis – a patient and examiner blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trialFlorian Pfab, MD,1,2,3 Marie-Therese Kirchner,3 Johannes Huss-Marp, MD,1,3 Tibor Schuster, PhD,4 Peter C. Schalock, MD,5 Jiang Fuqin, MD,1,3 Georgios I. Athanasiadis, MD,1 Heidrun Behrendt, MD,3 Johannes Ring, MD, PhD,1 Ulf Darsow, MD,1,3 and Vitaly Napadow, PhD2Author information ► Copyright and License information ► The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at AllergySee other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Go to:AbstractBackground

Itch is the major symptom of atopic dermatitis (AD). Acupuncture has been shown to exhibit a significant effect on experimental itch in AD. Our study evaluated acupuncture and anti-histamine itch therapy (cetirizine) on type-I-hypersensitivity itch and skin reaction in AD using a patient and examiner blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.

Methods

Allergen–induced itch was evaluated in 20 AD patients after several interventions in separate sessions: preventive (preceding) and abortive (concurrent) verum acupuncture (VAp and VAa), cetirizine (10mg, VC), corresponding placebo interventions (preventive, PAp, and abortive, PAa, placebo acupuncture; placebo cetirizine pill, PC), and a no-intervention control (NI). Itch was induced on the forearm and temperature modulated over 20 minutes, using our validated model. Outcome parameters included itch intensity, wheal and flare size, and the D2 Attention test.

Results

Mean itch intensity (SE: 0.31 each) was significantly lower following VAa (31.9) compared to all other groups (PAa: 36.5; VC: 36.8; VAp: 37.6; PC: 39.8; PAp: 39.9; NI: 45.7, p<0.05). There was no significant difference between VAp and VC (p>0.1), though both therapies were significantly superior to their respective placebo interventions (p<0.05). Flare size following VAp was significantly smaller (p=0.034) than PAp. D2 attention test score was significantly lower following VC compared to all other groups (p<0.001).

Conclusions

Both VA and cetirizine significantly reduced type-I-hypersensitivity itch in AD patients, compared to both placebo and NI. Timing of acupuncture application was important, as VAa had the most significant effect on itch, potentially due to counter-irritation and/or distraction. Itch reduction following cetirizine coincided with reduced attention.

Keywords: Itch, allergen, acupuncture, atopic eczema, cetirizine, attention

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Acupuncture as a cure for allergies | Time Magazine  - the Classical Medicine Journal - Health, Medicine, And Breaking News on the Alternative Treatment Front.

Acupuncture as a cure for allergies | Time Magazine  - the Classical Medicine Journal - Health, Medicine, And Breaking News on the Alternative Treatment Front. | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it
Acupuncture as a cure for allergies | Time Magazine FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013 AT 9:48AM

Acupuncture already helps to relieve pain in some patients, and the latest study hints that it might relieve sneezing and itchy eyes as well.

From Time/CNN

Most patients plagued with sniffles brought on by seasonal allergies turn to antihistamines for relief, but when they don't get relief, some opt for alternative treatments like acupuncture, in which tiny needles inserted just under the skin at specific points in the body are used to reduce certain symptoms.

In a study published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers examined 422 people who tested positive for pollen allergies and had allergic nasal symptoms such as a runny nose. The participants reported their symptoms as well as what medication and doses they used to treat them.

The researchers then divided them into three groups; one received 12 acupuncture treatments and took antihistamines as needed, a second group received 12 fake acupuncture treatments (needles placed at random, non-meaningful points in the body) and took antihistamines as needed, while the final group only took antihistamines for symptoms.

After two months, the researchers asked the patients about their symptoms and how much medication they used. The participants who received the real acupuncture treatments with their antihistamines showed a greater improvement in their allergy symptoms and less use of antihistamines compared to the other groups.

But the fact that even the participants receiving the sham acupuncture therapy reported some relief of their symptoms suggests that a strong placebo effect may be responsible for at least part of the improvement.

That possibility was supported by the fact that after four months of follow-up, the difference between the groups was less pronounced. The researchers speculate that the patients' expectations of how much the acupuncture might help them could have influenced their reports of improved symptoms.

But if the treatments are providing some type of relief, then acupuncture's potential role in treating allergies should be investigated further, the authors say. "The effectiveness of acupuncture for (seasonal allergies) compared with other antiallergic interventions and the possible underlying mechanisms of any effect, including context effects, need to be addressed in further research," they write in the study.

Read more: Acupuncture for allergies

 

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Traditional Chinese medicine for pressure ulcer: a meta-analysis. - PubMed - NCBI

Traditional Chinese medicine for pressure ulcer: a meta-analysis. - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it
Int Wound J. 2013 Apr;10(2):221-31. doi: 10.1111/j.1742-481X.2012.00969.x. Epub 2012 Apr 18. Comparative Study; Meta-Analysis; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review

 

Int Wound J. 2013 Apr;10(2):221-31. doi: 10.1111/j.1742-481X.2012.00969.x. Epub 2012 Apr 18.Traditional Chinese medicine for pressure ulcer: a meta-analysis.Zhang QH1, Sun ZR, Yue JH, Ren X, Qiu LB, Lv XL, Du W.Author information Abstract

To assess the effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) [Chinese herbal medicine ointment (CHMO), acupuncture and moxibustion] on pressure ulcer. In this study, we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTER, CBM, CNKI, WAN FANG and VIP for articles published from database inception up to 4 April 2011. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), which compared the effects of TCM with other interventions. We assessed the methodological quality of these trials using Cochrane risk of bias criteria. Ten of 565 potentially relevant trails that enrolled a total of 893 patients met our inclusion criteria. All the included RCTs only used CHMO intervention, because acupuncture and moxibustion trials failed to meet the inclusive criteria. A meta-analysis showed beneficial effects of CHMO for pressure ulcer compared with other treatments on the total effective rate [risk ratio (RR): 1·28; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1·20-1·36; P = 0·53; I(2) = 0%), curative ratio (RR: 2·02; 95% CI: 1·73-2·35; P = 0·11; I(2) = 37%) and inefficiency rate (RR: 0·16; 95% CI: 0·02-0·80; P = 0·84; I(2) = 0%). However, the funnel plot indicated that there was publication bias in this study. The evidence that CHMO is effective for pressure ulcer is encouraging, but due to several caveats, not conclusive. Therefore, more rigorous studies seem warranted.

© 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

PMID: 22512889 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Low cost treatment of leg ulcers

Low cost treatment of leg ulcers | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Electroacupuncture for a leg ulcer proves beneficial in this case study by a GP.

 

Poinst used are St36, GB34, Bl40, Sp9, Liv3, St44, Sp6, Bl60.

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An Epidemiological Study of Hyperhidrosis Patients Visiting the Ajou University Hospital Hyperhidrosis Center in Korea

An Epidemiological Study of Hyperhidrosis Patients Visiting the Ajou University Hospital Hyperhidrosis Center in Korea | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it
Park EJ, et al. J Korean Med Sci. 2010 May;25(5):772-775. http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2010.25.5.772

 

J Korean Med Sci. 2010 May;25(5):772-775. English.
Published online April 16, 2010.  http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2010.25.5.772 ©; 2010 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.  An Epidemiological Study of Hyperhidrosis Patients Visiting the Ajou University Hospital Hyperhidrosis Center in KoreaEun Jung Park, Kyung Ream Han, Ho Choi, Do Wan Kim and Chan KimHyperhidrosis Center, Ajou University Hospital, Suwon, Korea.
Address for Correspondence: Chan Kim, M.D. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Ajou University Hospital, 164 Worldcup-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-721, Korea. Tel: +82.31-219-5689, Fax: +82.31-219-6656, Email: dreunjung@paran.com  Received March 30, 2009; Accepted September 24, 2009.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Go to:Abstract

Hyperhidrosis is a disorder of perspiration in excess of the body's physiologic need and significantly impacts one's occupational, physical, emotional, and social life. The purpose of our study was to investigate the characteristics of primary hyperhidrosis in 255 patients at Ajou University Hospital Hyperhidrosis Center from March 2006, to February 2008. Information collected from the medical records was: sex, sites of hyperhidrosis, age at visit, age of onset, aggravating factors, hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS) rank, family history, occupation, and past treatment. A total of 255 patient records were reviewed; 57.6% were male. Patients with a family history (34.1%) showed a lower age of onset (13.21±5.80 yr vs. 16.04±9.83 yr in those without family history); 16.5% had previous treatment, most commonly oriental medicine. Palmar and plantar sites were the most commonly affected, and 87.9% of patients felt their sweating was intolerable and always interfered with their daily activities. Our study provides some original information on the Korean primary hyperhidrosis population. Patients who have a family history show signs of disease in early age than those without family history.

  

 

Keywords: Epidemiology, Primary Hyperhidrosis.

 

Go to:INTRODUCTION

Hyperhidrosis is a condition characterized by excessive sweating and can be focal (primary) or generalized (secondary) (1). Secondary hyperhidrosis is caused by an underlying condition such as infection, endocrine or metabolic disorders, neoplastic diseases, neurologic conditions, spinal cord injuries, cardiovascular or respiratory disorders, anxiety, or stress (2,3).

Primary hyperhidrosis has been associated with hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and can affect the palms, soles, axillae, face, and scalp as well as other sites (2,4). This condition occurs in otherwise healthy people and can have a deeply detrimental effect on quality of life, resulting in impairment of daily activities, social interactions and occupational activities (5,6).

A pilot study of young Israelis reported an incidence of 1% (7), and hyperhidrosis prevalence in the United States is 2.8%, equivalent to 7.8 million people (2). Hyperhidrosis is uncommon but not rare. Despite many treatment modalities, research into the characteristics of hyperhidrosis patients is limited. Here, we retrospectively investigated the epidemiologic characteristics of primary hyperhidrosis patients visiting a hyperhidrosis center in Korea.

Go to:MATERIALS AND METHODS

We reviewed the medical records of patients visiting our hyperhidrosis center between March 2006, and February 2008, for diagnosis and treatment of hyperhidrosis. Information collected from the medical records included: sex, age at visit, age of onset, referral source, occupation, family history, past treatment, hyperhidrosis sites, aggravating factors and hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS) ranking. We analyzed the relationship between family history of hyperhidrosis and age of onset. Qualitative variables are expressed as percentages and compared using Pearson's chi-square test. Quantitative variables are expressed as mean±standard deviation and compared using Student's t-test. We analyzed the results with SPSS version 15.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA) and all P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

Go to:RESULTS

A total of 255 medical records were reviewed; 57.6% of the patients were male, the mean age was 28.54±13.44 yr old at the date of visit, with a mean age of onset of 15.0±8.78 yr old, and 34.1% of all patients had a positive family history of hyperhidrosis (Table 1). The mean age of onset in those with a positive family history was 13.21±5.80 yr, significantly lower than the age (16.04±9.83 yr) in those without family history of hyperhidrosis (P<0.006).

   Table 1 
Patient demographic data

 

The route to visit our center and occupation of the patients are described by frequency (Tables 2,3). The most common route of visit was "arranged by individual clinic" and the most common occupational category was "student". Previous treatment was attempted by 42 of the 255 patients (16.5%). The most common treatment modality before the visit was oriental medicine such as herbal medication and acupuncture (Table 4). The most common aggravating factors were stress or anxiety, and social relationships (Table 5).

   Table 2 
Referral source   Table 3 
Patient occupation   Table 4 
Previous treatment   Table 5 
Aggravating factors

 

Palmar and plantar sites were the most commonly affected sites (Fig. 1). We determined how hyperhidrosis affected their life using the hyperhidrosis disease severity scale. Most (87.9%) patients felt their sweating was intolerable and always interferes with their daily activities (Fig. 2).

   Fig. 1 
Sites of hyperhidrosis. Others are any combinations of excessive sweating sites except palmar/platar and palmar/plantar/axillae.   Fig. 2 
Impact of sweating on daily activities accounting by hyperhidrosis severity scale.

 

Go to:DISCUSSION

This research provides original information on primary hyperhidrosis and is the first descriptive study of Korean hyperhidrosis patients. The average age of onset is 15.0 yr old in our study, earlier than in a 2004 United States prevalence study (25.2 yr) (2). However, a more recent US study in 2007 showed a similar average age of onset to our study (14.05 yr) (8); the mean age at first visit for diagnosing and treatment of hyperhidrosis was 28.05 yr in our study and also in the recent US study (8), compared to 39.8 yr in the 2004 study (2). These studies showed that primary hyperhidrosis appeared in adolescence, but people seek medical treatment in early adulthood. Stolman suggested a genetic predisposition may exist, since 30-50% of patients have a family history of hyperhidrosis (9). A pedigree analysis by Kaufmann et al. (10) suggested that hyperhidrosis segregated independently as an autosomal dominant trait and was not inherited as a crosslinked trait. Ro et al. (11) reported a 65% incidence of positive family history in 49 patients with hyperhidrosis that had undergone thoracoscopic sympathectomy. The 2007 US study showed 47.3% of hyperhidrosis patients had a positive family history and patients who reported an onset age below 20 yr of age were more likely to have a positive family history of hyperhidrosis than those with a later age of onset (8). In line with these results, our study revealed a family history in 34.1% of primary hyperhidrosis cases; and positive family history patients had a younger onset age than those with a negative family history (13.21±5.80 yr old vs. 16.04±9.83 yr old).

Hyperhidrosis is present in 2.8% of the general population in the United States (2). This condition can have a deeply detrimental effect on a patient's quality of life, resulting in dramatic impairments of daily activities, social interactions and occupational activities (5,6). But, patients rarely seek a physician because many are unaware there are many treatments for primary hyperhidrosis (1). In this study we asked patients how they were referred to our hyperhidrosis clinic or how they got information for hyperhidrosis treatment. The most common referral mode was recommendation by individual clinics, although many patients also found information from the internet or mass media.

Lear et al. (8) reported patients had some form of treatment before the consult visit, such as topical aluminum chloride or botulinum toxin type A subcutaneous injections. However, in this study the most common treatment modality before the visit was oriental medicine such as herbal medication and acupuncture.

Hyperhidrosis can be generalized, involving the whole body, but primary focal hyperhidrosis involves limited body areas, most often palms, soles, face, axillae or a combination of them. In our study, the most commonly affected sites that had excessive sweating were palmar and plantar sites simultaneously (32.2%). Other common sites were a combination of palmar, plantar and axillae (22.4%). There are many treatment modalities for hyperhidrosis such as topical aluminum chloride, iontophoresis, botulinum toxin type A injection, endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS), axillary sweat gland removal, oral anticholinergic, and chemical lumbar sympathectomy (CLS) (12-15). Most of such treatment modalities are usually effective for focal area. But our results showed many patients suffer from excessive sweating in multiple sites. In our clinic, We are performing different procedure depending on problem area. Patients who has only palmar hyperhidrosis, we perform VATS. Patients who has only plantar hyperhidrosis, we perform CLS. Patients who has only axillary hyperhidrosis, we perform axillary sweat gland removal. We use oral anticholinergic (glycopyrrolate) for the patients who has multiple sites hyperhidrosis or refuse to have invasive procedure, contraindication to have invasive treatment, recurrence after above mentioned procedure such as ETS, CLS, and axillary sweat gland removal.

Excessive sweating of primary hyperhidrosis patients is usually triggered by anxiety, embarrassment, fear, anger, excitement, or mental stress (16). Eccrine sweat glands are innervated by cholinergic fibers from the sympathetic nervous system. Their sweat secretion function is affected by emotional and gustatory stimuli. Nearly all (95%) primary hyperhidrosis patients said their sweating was intensified when they were in stressful situations or felt anxiety, and 77.0% felt their symptoms were aggravated in social situations. Another common trigger factor was heat.

The severity and impact of hyperhidrosis was assessed using the HDSS, which provides a qualitative measure allowing tailored treatment; this validated and reliable instrument has been used in other studies of hyperhidrosis (17,18). The HDSS is used to determine the severity of sweating experienced by the respondents. A 4-point, single-item question, the HDSS asks patients to indicate which of the following best describes the impact of sweating on their daily activities: 1) never noticeable, never interferes; 2) tolerable, sometime interferes; 3) barely tolerable, frequently interferes; or 4) intolerable and always interferes. Most (87.9%) of hyperhidrosis patients have sweating that is a '4'.

In conclusion, we described the epidemiologic characteristics of primary hyperhidrosis patients in Korea for the first time. These characteristics can help physicians who treat the patients. The patients who have a family history show signs of disease in early age than those without family history. Most of hyperhidrosis patients have intolerable sweating and excessive sweating which interfered their daily activities. Since the study scope was limited to one hyperhidrosis center; a national survey should be performed to further expand the data available to assist whole Korean patients.

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Acupuncture for skincare - TV3 Xposé Entertainment

Acupuncture for skincare - TV3 Xposé Entertainment | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Wednesday, 18 June 2014

Acupuncture for skincare

Could the alternative therapy save your complexion?

It's being hailed as the most innovate weapon in the anti-ageing war. But is cosmetic acupuncture really capable of turning back the clock?

If you ask Madonna and Gwyneth Paltrow, the answer is a resounding yes. They're just some of the celebrities who have reportedly shunned invasive wrinkle-fighting procedures in favour of facial needles.

So how exactly does acupuncture work? Acupuncture is a form of ancient Chinese medicine in which pin-like needles are inserted into the skin at certain points on the body. It originated more than 2,000 years ago, and is used to treat everything from backache to migraines and fertility problems.

Facial acupuncture sees these needles being inserted into various acupuncture points on the face, such as wrinkles or frown lines. The stimulation brought on by the needles is meant to make blood rush to the face, causing it to become flushed. When needles are inserted at pressure points, energy and endorphins are released. This minor trauma improves blood flow and stimulates cell re-growth.

Plus, facial acupuncture actually promotes the development of new collagen fibers under already-present wrinkles, in effect filing them in - making them appear less visible. The idea is that after several sessions the eyes will begin to brighten, skill will become firmer, and lips will become plumper.

It is also supposed to remedy blemished skin. Practitioners claim acupuncture can reduce wrinkles, eliminate fine lines, lift sagging skin and improve skin colour and texture. Its effects last for about three months, and it only takes about 45 minutes.


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Acupuncture and facial rejuvenation. [Aesthet Surg J. 2005 Jul-Aug] - PubMed - NCBI

Acupuncture and facial rejuvenation. [Aesthet Surg J. 2005 Jul-Aug] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Aesthet Surg J. 2005 Jul-Aug;25(4):419-24. doi: 10.1016/j.asj.2005.05.001.Acupuncture and facial rejuvenation.Barrett JB.Abstract

In traditional Oriental medicine, facial rejuvenation is achieved by inserting acupuncture needles at different points along designated channels to attain tonification or sedation effects. According to the author, treatment benefits include elimination of some wrinkles and decrease in length and depth of others, decrease of facial edema, decrease of acne, improvement of facial muscle tone, improved skin texture with tighter pores, and decrease of sagging around the eyes, cheeks, chin, and neck.

PMID: 19338843 [PubMed

 

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Acupuncture and a gluten-free diet relieve urticaria and eczema in a case of undiagnosed dermatitis herpetiformis and atypical or extraintestinal celiac disease: a case report

Acupuncture and a gluten-free diet relieve urticaria and eczema in a case of undiagnosed dermatitis herpetiformis and atypical or extraintestinal celiac disease: a case report | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Acupuncture and a gluten-free diet relieve urticaria and eczema in a case of undiagnosed dermatitis herpetiformis and atypical or extraintestinal celiac disease: a case report

 

Bahia A. Ohlsen, DC, MS, MBA

 

 

Abstract

Objective

The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of acupuncture and a gluten-free diet (GFD) for urticaria and severe eczema in a patient with undiagnosed dermatitis herpetiformis and atypical or extraintestinal celiac disease.

Clinical Features

A 48-year-old woman presented with intense urticaria, eczema, worsening heartburn, chronic constipation, headaches, and an intense feeling of heat for 4 months. Results of punch biopsies of the skin lesions and laboratory tests were inconclusive. After the acupuncture sessions reported here ended, human leukocyte antigen blood typing revealed celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis–associated human leukocyte antigen DQ-8. Results of an endoscopy and colonoscopy were negative.

Intervention and Outcome

The patient received 3 acupuncture treatments a week for 12 weeks. The patient's symptoms began in March 2008. She began using topical and oral steroids and felt that her symptoms were not responding. Acupuncture began in July 2008. At the end of the first 12 treatments, during which she was using topical and oral steroids, the urticaria and constipation resolved completely; and she had temporary relief from the heartburn. It is thought that the urticaria and constipation resolved because of the acupuncture as that was the only change. At the end of the second 12 treatments, during which time she had started Optifast, a GFD, the heartburn, headache, and eczema resolved. At the end of the third 12 treatments, all her symptoms remained resolved. Steroid treatment was discontinued after the first 12 treatments.

Conclusion

Acupuncture and diet changes appeared to provide relief from the urticaria and eczema of dermatitis herpetiformis beyond that obtained by traditional treatment of a GFD alone.

Key indexing terms: Acupuncture therapy, Dermatitis herpetiformis, Celiac disease, HLA-DQ antigens, Gluten-free dietIntroduction

Celiac disease (CD) is described in one of the following 4 ways: typical, atypical or extraintestinal, silent, or latent.1,2 All forms, with and without verifiable small intestinal damage and with and without positive anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) testing result, have been associated with increased mortality.3 Only typical CD is associated with the well-documented enteropathic symptoms of diarrhea, weight loss, malabsorption, and the criterion standard positive small bowel biopsy result showing 

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Effects of acupuncture on skin and muscle blood flow in healthy subjects [Eur J Appl Physiol. 2003] - PubMed - NCBI

Effects of acupuncture on skin and muscle blood flow in healthy subjects [Eur J Appl Physiol. 2003] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Eur J Appl Physiol. 2003 Sep;90(1-2):114-9. Epub 2003 Jun 24

 

 

Effects of acupuncture on skin and muscle blood flow in healthy subjects

Sandberg M1, Lundeberg T, Lindberg LG, Gerdle B.Author information 

 

Abstract

 

In 14 healthy female subjects, the effects of needle stimulation (acupuncture) on skin and muscle blood flow were investigated using a non-invasive custom-designed probe and photoplethysmography (PPG). In randomised order, 2-7 days apart, three modes of needle stimulation were performed on the anterior aspect of the tibia: superficial insertion (SF), insertion into the anterior tibial muscle (Mu), and insertion into the muscle including manipulation of the needle in order to elicit a distinct sensation of distension, heaviness or numbness (DeQi). Before intervention, the subjects rested for 30 min. After the intervention, the needle was left in situ for 20 min. Blood flow recordings were performed intermittently from 10 min prior to the intervention to the end of the trial. In a fourth session, serving as control, corresponding measurements were performed without any needle stimulation. Area under curve was calculated for 5-min periods prior to and after stimulation, respectively, and for the remaining 15-min period after stimulation. Compared to the control situation, muscle blood flow increased following both Mu and DeQi for 20 min, with the latter being more pronounced for the initial 5 min. Skin blood flow increased for 5 min following DeQi. However, no increase was found following SF. The DeQi stimulation was preceded by higher visual analogue scale ratings of anxiety prior to stimulation, which might have influenced skin blood flow to some extent. The results indicate that the intensity of the needling is of importance, the DeQi stimulation resulting in the most pronounced increase in both skin and muscle blood flow.

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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BMJ- Neurogenic pruritus: A retrospective case series of treatment by acupuncture "acupuncture appeared to be effective in alleviating the distressing symptom of itching in patients presenting with...

BMJ- Neurogenic pruritus: A retrospective case series of treatment by acupuncture "acupuncture appeared to be effective in alleviating the distressing symptom of itching in patients presenting with... | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Acupunct Med 2002;20:186-190 doi:10.1136/aim.20.4.186

PaperNeurogenic pruritus: an unrecognised problem? A retrospective case series of treatment by acupunctureAnthony Stellon, general practitioner

+Author Affiliations

Temple Ewell, Kent, UK stellon@btinternet.comSummary

Intractable localised segmental pruritus without a rash has been reported over the years under various titles depending on the area of the body affected. Notalgia paraesthetica and brachioradial pruritus are the two terms used for what is believed to be a form of neuropathy. The clinical observations reported here suggest that other localised cases of pruritus exist that share common clinical features, and the term neurogenic pruritus is suggested to encompass these under one clinical condition. Acupuncture has been used to treat skin conditions, of which pruritus is one symptom. This retrospective study looked at the symptomatic relief of neurogenic pruritus in 16 patients using acupuncture. In 12 cases the affected dermatomes of the body were innervated by cervical spinal nerves, seven innervated by dorsal spinal nerves and four innervated by the lumbar spinal nerves. Seven patients had areas affected by two different regions of the spine. Restricted neck or back movements were noted in patients as were areas of paravertebral spasm or tenderness of the muscles. Total resolution of symptoms as judged by VAS occurred in 75% of patients. Relapse occurred in 37% of patients within 1-12 months following treatment. Acupuncture appeared to be effective in alleviating the distressing symptom of itching in patients presenting with neurogenic pruritus.

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Acupuncture treatment for psoriasis: a retrospective case report. [Acupunct Electrother Res. 1992 Jul-Sep] - PubMed - NCBI (case series of 61 cases)

Acupuncture treatment for psoriasis: a retrospective case report. [Acupunct Electrother Res. 1992 Jul-Sep] - PubMed - NCBI (case series of 61 cases) | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Acupunct Electrother Res. 1992 Jul-Sep;17(3):195-208.

 

Acupuncture treatment for psoriasis: a retrospective case report.

 

Liao SJ1, Liao TA.Author information 

 

Abstract

 

We treated 61 cases of psoriasis with acupuncture, including 25 patients with complications of joint involvement and two cases with scleroderma additionally. All of the patients had failed to respond to their prior conventional western medical management. 25 patients were males and 36 were females. Their ages ranged from 22 to 84 years, with an average of about 52 years. There was no significant difference of the average ages between the sexes. Most of them (about 61%) had quite extensive involvement of the body. The average of duration of their illness was over 16 years, ranging from two to 65 years. They received an average of about nine sessions of acupuncture treatment, ranging from one to 15.

 

Almost one third (19) of them had eleven to thirteen sessions. With the acupuncture treatment, about one-half (30) of the 61 patients had complete or almost complete clearance of the skin lesions. About a quarter (14 patients) of them had a clearance of about two thirds of the skin lesions. Eight of them had a clearance of one third of the skin lesions. Nine patients had minimal or no improvement. Our experience indicates that acupuncture is induced an effective therapeutic modality for psoriasis, particularly when the western medical management is unsuccessful. We speculated about the possible involvement of the cutaneous reticuloendothelial system in the clearance of the skin lesions.

 

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Traditional Chinese medicine in dermatology - Koo - 2003 - Dermatologic Therapy - Wiley Online Library

Traditional Chinese medicine in dermatology - Koo - 2003 - Dermatologic Therapy - Wiley Online Library | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Traditional Chinese medicine in dermatologyAuthorsJohn Koo, Rishi Desai First published: 19 June 2003Full publication historyDOI: 10.1046/j.1529-8019.2003.01617.xCiting literature

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: John Koo, MD, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143. email:jymkoo@orca.ucsf.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT:  Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an alternative method of therapy that can be administered in oral, topical, or injectable forms. It emphasizes the importance of using many herbs that are combined in different formulations for each individual patient. Since it is not possible to discuss all applications of TCM in every skin disorder, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis are used as the prototypes in illustrating the use of TCM. A number of studies have shown the usefulness of TCM in the treatment of these skin conditions, and thus it is worthwhile for dermatologists throughout the West to gain some familiarity with this method. We attempt to provide a general overview of TCM through a discussion of efficacy, mechanisms of action, and side effects of various TCMs. A warning regarding the possible contamination of TCMs is also included. In the future, perhaps a better understanding of TCM will be gained through more systematic analysis and controlled studies with a placebo arm. It is our hope that this article will provide dermatologists with a more complete understanding of the role and ramifications of TCM therapy.

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Efficacy of ah shi point acupuncture on acne vulgaris -- Son et al. 28 (3): 126 -- Acupuncture in Medicine

Efficacy of ah shi point acupuncture on acne vulgaris -- Son et al. 28 (3): 126 -- Acupuncture in Medicine | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Acupunct Med 2010;28:126-129 doi:10.1136/aim.2010.003004

Original papersEfficacy of ah shi point acupuncture on acne vulgarisByeong-Kook Son, Younghee Yun, In-Hwa Choi

+Author Affiliations

Department of Oriental Dermatology, Kyung Hee University, East-West Neo Medical Center, Seoul, KoreaCorrespondence toDr In-Hwa Choi, Department of Oriental Dermatology, Kyung Hee University, East-West Neo Medical Center, 149 Sangil-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-090, Korea; inhwajun@khnmc.or.krAccepted 4 August 2010Abstract

Background Ah shi point acupuncture involves inserting needles at painful or pathological sites.

Objective To evaluate the efficacy of ah shi point and general acupuncture point treatment of acne vulgaris.

Methods 36 subjects were recruited and randomised in a double-blind (patient-blind and observer-blind) controlled trial to receive acupuncture either at general acupuncture points only, or at both general acupuncture points and ah shi points 12 times over 6 weeks. The subjects were evaluated using the following outcome measurements: an inflammatory lesion count, a quality-of-life scale (Skindex-29) and a subjective symptom score.

Results After 12 treatment sessions, there was a significant reduction in the inflammatory acne lesion counts, the Skindex-29 scores and the subjective symptom scores from baseline in both groups, but no significant difference between groups.

Conclusions Acupuncture treatment of moderate acne vulgaris was associated with reduction of inflammatory lesions and improvement of the quality of life.

Accepted 4 August 2010
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Acupuncture with Herbs Clears Acne - New Finding

Acupuncture with Herbs Clears Acne - New Finding | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Acupuncture with Herbs Clears Acne - New Finding

on 18 June 2013.

 

 

Acupuncture is effective in the treatment of acne. A meta-analysis of 43 acupuncture acne trials with approximately 3,500 patients was reviewed. Several types of acne were investigated: vulgaris, papulopustular, inflammatory, adolescent and polymorphic. The researchers discovered that when acupuncture is added to a therapeutic regime, it synergistically enhances the medicinal benefits of the treatment protocol and leads to superior patient outcomes. Acupuncture combined with herbal medicine yields better results than herbal medicine as a standalone modality. Acupuncture combined with herbal face masks yields better results than herbal face masks as a standalone therapy. Interestingly, the researchers discovered that adding cupping therapy also enhanced clinical outcomes. No serious adverse effects were reported for any of the patients. The researchers note that acupuncture is both safe and effective for the treatment of acne and recommend further research.

These findings are consistent with a recent study showing that acupuncture regulates hormone levels in women with PCOS, polycystic ovarian syndrome. PCOS is marked by hirsutism, acne, insulin resistance and infertility. The study showed that acupuncture successfully regulated endogenous sex steroids in the ovaries and in the blood. The research was conducted by the Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology and was published in the American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism. This study indicates that acupuncture may be helpful in controlling symptoms associated with PCOS, including acne.

The use of herbal teas and face masks for the treatment of acne has a long and well-documented historical record in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The herb Qing Dai is often powdered and mixed with either bitter melon or cucumber juice to form a paste. The paste is applied as a mask and is retained for about a half hour. Its anti-toxin and anti-inflammatory properties helps to reduce even the most pernicious cystic acne. The new research demonstrates that the addition of acupuncture to an herbal face mask protocol increases positive clinical outcomes. Prof. Jeffrey Pang, L.Ac. of the Healthcare Medicine Institute notes that acupuncture opens the channels and guides the herbs to deliver their clinical benefits. Prof. Pang will be presenting new dietetics webinars throughout the year at the Healthcare Medicine Institute. Take a look at the video below to view a sample of a dietetics webinar.


Reference:
Cao, Hui-juan, Guo-yan Yang, Yu-yi Wang, and Jian-ping Liu. "Acupoint Stimulation for Acne: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials." Medical Acupuncture (2013).

 

- See more at: http://www.healthcmi.com/Acupuncture-Continuing-Education-News/782-acneacupuncturetcm#sthash.9F9C3Zrt.FYsNk4a7.dpuf

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[Clinical research on bedsores treated with fire needle therapy]. - PubMed - NCBI

[Clinical research on bedsores treated with fire needle therapy]. - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it
Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2010 Oct;30(10):819-21. English Abstract; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

 

Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2010 Oct;30(10):819-21.[Clinical research on bedsores treated with fire needle therapy].[Article in Chinese]Yan CL1, Liu QJ, Yang P, Fu AJ, Zhu J, Wang HH.Author information AbstractOBJECTIVE:

To discuss the clinical efficacy of fire needle therapy on bedsores.

METHODS:

Fifty-four cases of bedsores were divided randomly into a fire needling group and a filiform needling group, 27 cases in each one. In fire needling group, fire needle therapy was applied. In fifliform needling group, common needling technique with filiform needle was adopted. The wound surface and Ashi points around the sores were punctured in either group. The efficacy and the treatment session required in different phases were observed in two groups.

RESULTS:

The satisfactory rate of the efficacy was 91.4% (53/58) in fire needling group and was 75.9% (41/54) in common needling group, indicating statistical significant difference in comparison (P < 0.05). The sessions in the phases III and IV of bedsores increased significantly as compared with those in the phase II of two groups (both P < 0.05), of which, the sessions in phases III and IV of fire needling group were shortened apparently as compared with those of filiform needling group (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

The efficacy of the fire needling therapy is superior to that of common needling on bedsores, and it is an effective approach to bedsores.

PMID: 21058478 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Why You Should Ditch Your Dermatologist For Acupuncture

Why You Should Ditch Your Dermatologist For Acupuncture | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it
Turns out, acupuncture is shockingly versatile

 

I suffered from debilitating migraines for years, and after experiencing countless negative side effects (and little relief) from powerful medications, I had just about given up on treatment. That is until a close friend of mine recommended her acupuncturist. She had been seeing him for about a month for her headaches, anxiety, and hormone imbalances and had nothing but glowing reviews. I quickly booked an appointment, and after regular treatments, I found that my migraines had considerably subsided, leaving me with only one or two painful days a month instead of the 15-plus days I was used to.

That's when I decided to do some digging. What couldn't acupuncture treat? Nearly nothing, as it turns out. Acupuncture is shockingly versatile, even for skin care. It's a great alternative method for ageing skin and breakouts in lieu of more-invasive procedures like Botox and heavy-duty acne medications. So far, I've been blessed with clear, firm skin, but when the time comes to get more serious about my complexion, I'd rather go with preventative options over corrective ones. I sat down with my acupuncturist, Dr. Min Zhang, a practitioner for over 25 years, to get the skin care scoop.

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Inpatient treatment for severe atopic dermatitis [Complement Ther Med. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Inpatient treatment for severe atopic dermatitis [Complement Ther Med. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Complement Ther Med. 2013 Jun;21(3):200-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2012.12.002. Epub 2013 Jan 11.Inpatient treatment for severe atopic dermatitis in a Traditional Korean Medicine hospital: introduction and retrospective chart review.Yun Y1, Lee S, Kim S, Choi I.Author information AbstractOBJECTIVES:

Patients with atopic dermatitis increasingly seek complementary and alternative medical treatment. A number of studies have demonstrated the efficacy of herbs and acupuncture in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Some patients with extensive disease, outpatient treatment failure, acute deterioration or highly impaired everyday functioning require inpatient care. The aim of this study was to introduce and evaluate inpatient treatments for severe atopic dermatitis patients at a Traditional Korean Medicine hospital.

DESIGN AND SUBJECTS:

We performed a retrospective chart review of inpatients with severe atopic dermatitis between March 2008 and October 2011. Eligibility criteria for inclusion were: (1) a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis according to the criteria established by Hanifin and Rajka and (2) hospitalisation because of severe atopic dermatitis (objective scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) score ≥ 40).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENT:

The SCORAD score was assessed by trained investigators at admission and discharge.

RESULTS:

Among 37 inpatients, there were 29 patients who met the criteria. Patients received treatments including acupuncture, herbal medicine and herbal wet wrap dressings. The mean total scoring SCORAD decreased from 60.63 to 37.37 during hospitalisation. Despite the relatively small sample size, these findings were statistically significant.

CONCLUSION:

In atopic dermatitis, Traditional Korean Medicine effectively decreased clinical disease severity. This study's weaknesses include the relatively small number of patients, some aspects of the study design, lack of follow-up assessment and lack of second measurement.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Fight fine lines and wrinkles with acupuncture

Fight fine lines and wrinkles with acupuncture | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it
The technique of acupuncture has been around for centuries, but you can use it to rejuvenate your skin
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Acupuncture and Cellulitis Treatment | eCellulitis

Acupuncture and Cellulitis Treatment | eCellulitis | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it
Acupuncture involves the use of needles, which are inserted into the patient’s skin at key points around the body. These points are believed to be part of an intricate pathway of energy flowing through the body.

Via Acupuncture Bedford, Shaftesbury Clinic
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Eczema and Psoriasis - research and information

Eczema and Psoriasis - research and information | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

How acupuncture can help

 

There are few published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of the effects of acupuncture in the treatment of chronic inflammatory skin conditions such as atopic eczema and psoriasis. Two small RCTs found that acupuncture reduced itch in patients with atopic eczema (Pfab 2011; Pfab 2010). On the other hand, a small RCT of acupuncture for psoriasis concluded that classical acupuncture is not superior to sham acupuncture (Jerner 1997). Sham interventions are not inactive placebos, but effectively different versions of acupuncture, so their value in evaluating treatment efficacy is highly questionable. (see Table below)

In general, acupuncture is believed to stimulate the nervous system and cause the release of neurochemical messenger molecules. The resulting biochemical changes influence the body's homeostatic mechanisms, thus promoting physical and emotional well-being. Stimulation of certain acupuncture points has been shown to affect areas of the brain that are known to reduce sensitivity to pain and stress (Hui 2010)

Acupuncture may help to relieve symptoms in people with atopic eczema and psoriasis by:

reducing inflammation, by promoting release of vascular and immunomodulatory factors (Zijlstra 2003; Kavoussi 2007);regulating mediators of the allergic reaction to extrinsic allergens, for example Ig-E (Rao 2006), serum cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IFN-, Ig-E) (Okumura 2002), and basophils (Pfab 2011);enhancing natural killer cell activities and modulating the number and ratio of immune cell types (Kawakita 2008);increasing local microcirculation (Komori 2009), which aids dispersal of swelling;

Shaftesbury Clinic Bedford's insight:

Shaftesbury Clinic is a member of the British Acupuncture Council, please also follow this link for the relevant research relating to the above:

 

http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/eczema-and-psoriasis.html

and click on the tab for "The Evidence"

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Acupuncture treatment for psoriasis: a retrospective case report. - Abstract - Europe PubMed Central

Acupuncture treatment for psoriasis: a retrospective case report. - Abstract - Europe PubMed Central | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it
Liao SJ, Liao TANew York University Dental College, New York.Acupuncture & Electro-therapeutics Research[1992, 17(3):195-208]Type: Journal Article

 

Abstract#

 

We treated 61 cases of psoriasis with acupuncture, including 25 patients with complications of joint involvement and two cases with scleroderma additionally. All of the patients had failed to respond to their prior conventional western medical management. 25 patients were males and 36 were females. Their ages ranged from 22 to 84 years, with an average of about 52 years. There was no significant difference of the average ages between the sexes. Most of them (about 61%) had quite extensive involvement of the body. The average of duration of their illness was over 16 years, ranging from two to 65 years. They received an average of about nine sessions of acupuncture treatment, ranging from one to 15. Almost one third (19) of them had eleven to thirteen sessions. With the acupuncture treatment, about one-half (30) of the 61 patients had complete or almost complete clearance of the skin lesions. About a quarter (14 patients) of them had a clearance of about two thirds of the skin lesions. Eight of them had a clearance of one third of the skin lesions. Nine patients had minimal or no improvement. Our experience indicates that acupuncture is induced an effective therapeutic modality for psoriasis, particularly when the western medical management is unsuccessful. We speculated about the possible involvement of the cutaneous reticuloendothelial system in the clearance of the skin lesions.

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[Randomized controlled trials for treatment of 30 cases of ordinary psoriasis by acupuncture... - Abstract - Europe PubMed Central

[Randomized controlled trials for treatment of 30 cases of ordinary psoriasis by acupuncture... - Abstract - Europe PubMed Central | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it
[Randomized controlled trials for treatment of 30 cases of ordinary psoriasis by acupuncture and moxibustion].(PMID:21585062)

 

AbstractCitations BioEntities Related Articles External Links Wu JP, Gu SZFangshan Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 102400, China.Zhen ci yan jiu = Acupuncture Research / [Zhongguo yi xue ke xue Yuan Yi xue Qing bao yan jiu suo Bian ji][2011, 36(1):62-65]Type: 

 

Journal Article, Randomized Controlled Trial, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, English Abstract (lang: chi)

 

OBJECTIVE: To observe the therapeutic effect of acu-moxibustion for ordinary psoriasis, so as to find a better curative method for it.

METHODS: A total of 60 cases of psoriasis were equally randomized into medication group[(8. 67 - 6. 53) months in duration of disease, (39. 25+/- 10. 21) years in age] and acu-moxibustion group [(9. 16 7. 37) months in duration of disease, and (37. 38 +/- 11. 36) years in age] according to a random number table. For patients of acu-moxibustion group, main acupoints used were Feishu (BL13), Geshu (BL17), Ganshu (BL18), Pishu (BL 20) and Shenshu (BL 23), combined with other acupoints [Hegu (LI 4), Weizhong (BL 40), etc. ] according to the affected part of the body. Moxibustion was applied to Shenshu (BL 23) and the injured skin area for about 3 min every time. Acu-moxibustion treatment was given once every other day continuously for 12 weeks. Patients of the medication group were treated with oral administration of Acitretin capsules (20 mg/d, for 12 weeks). The therapeutic effect was evaluated by using psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) scoring method. Results After the treatment, the integrative scores of PASI in both medication and acu-moxibustion groups decreased significantly (P<0. 01), and that of the acu-moxibustion group was significantly lower than that of the medication group (P<0. 05). Of the both 30 psoriasis patients in the medication and acu-moxibustion groups, 1 (3. 33%) and 4 (13. 33%) were cured basically, 15 (50. 00%) and 17 (56. 67%) were improved significantly, 12 (40. 00%) and 6 (20. 00%) were effective, and 2 (6. 67%) and 3 (10. 00%) invalid, with the effective rates being 93. 33% and 90. 00%, respectively. The cured plus markedly effective rate of the acu-moxibustion group was significantly higher than that of the medication group (P<0. 05).

CONCLUSION: Acu-moxibustion therapy is effective in the treatment of psoriasis and is remarkably superior to that of medication.

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Acupuncture compared with oral antihistamine for type I hypersensitivity itch and skin response in adults with atopic dermatitis: a patient- and examiner-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, cr...

Acupuncture compared with oral antihistamine for type I hypersensitivity itch and skin response in adults with atopic dermatitis: a patient- and examiner-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, cr... | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Allergy. 2012 Apr;67(4):566-73. doi: 10.1111/j.1398-9995.2012.02789.x. Epub 2012 Feb 8.Acupuncture compared with oral antihistamine for type I hypersensitivity itch and skin response in adults with atopic dermatitis: a patient- and examiner-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.

 

Pfab F1, Kirchner MT, Huss-Marp J, Schuster T, Schalock PC, Fuqin J, Athanasiadis GI, Behrendt H, Ring J, Darsow U, Napadow V.Author information 

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Itch is the major symptom of atopic dermatitis (AD). Acupuncture has been shown to exhibit a significant effect on experimental itch in AD. Our study evaluated acupuncture and antihistamine itch therapy (cetirizine) on type I hypersensitivity itch and skin reaction in AD using a patient and examiner-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.

 

METHODS:

Allergen-induced itch was evaluated in 20 patients with AD after several interventions in separate sessions: preventive (preceding) and abortive (concurrent) verum acupuncture (VAp and VAa), cetirizine (10 mg, VC), corresponding placebo interventions (preventive, PAp, and abortive, PAa, placebo acupuncture; placebo cetirizine pill, PC) and a no-intervention control (NI). Itch was induced on the forearm and temperature modulated over 20 min, using our validated model. Outcome parameters included itch intensity, wheal and flare size and the D2 attention test.

 

RESULTS:

Mean itch intensity (SE: 0.31 each) was significantly lower following VAa (31.9) compared with all other groups (PAa: 36.5; VC: 36.8; VAp: 37.6; PC: 39.8; PAp: 39.9; NI: 45.7; P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between VAp and VC (P > 0.1), although both therapies were significantly superior to their respective placebo interventions (P < 0.05). Flare size following VAp was significantly smaller (P = 0.034) than that following PAp. D2 attention test score was significantly lower following VC compared with all other groups (P < 0.001).

 

CONCLUSIONS:

Both VA and cetirizine significantly reduced type I hypersensitivity itch in patients with AD, compared with both placebo and NI. Timing of acupuncture application was important, as VAa had the most significant effect on itch, potentially because of counter-irritation and/or distraction. Itch reduction following cetirizine coincided with reduced attention.

© 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

 

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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Acupuncture in dermatology: an historical perspective - Tan - 2009 - International Journal of Dermatology - Wiley Online Library

Acupuncture in dermatology: an historical perspective - Tan - 2009 - International Journal of Dermatology - Wiley Online Library | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it

Abstract

Classical acupuncture focuses primarily on treating the person, and secondarily treating the illness. The “symptoms” are regarded as “branch” expressions of a “root” (constitutional) imbalance. Different root imbalances can produce the same symptoms. Five patients with eczema, for example, may reveal five distinct root imbalances and would all be treated very differently. Because acupuncture treats the whole person, it has something to offer almost every condition. In many cases, acupuncture aims to bring about a complete cure; in others, it aims to manage the problem. Acupuncture remains a substantial part of the traditional Chinese medicine, which is used to treat many conditions including acne, alopecia, dermatitis, pruritus, psoriasis, rosacea, systemic lupus erythematosus, urticaria, herpes zoster, chicken pox, impetigo, leprosy, vitiligo, and tinea. This review introduces the historical context of acupuncture within Chinese medicine and how it relates to skin disease. Specifically, a key question is, what can we learn from the ancients with regard to their use of acupuncture as part of a holistic system of medicine, and how does this relate to the practice of modern dermatology?

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PSORIATIC RESEARCH IN CHINA - SHAO - 2007 - International Journal of Dermatology - Wiley Online Library

PSORIATIC RESEARCH IN CHINA - SHAO - 2007 - International Journal of Dermatology - Wiley Online Library | Acupuncture and dermatology | Scoop.it
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