Forensic Accounting-Aspect 1
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What is Forensic Accounting? Interview with Christiana Zouzias, CPA

http://zouzias.com/~zouzias/images/Christiana_Hiffman-sm.jpg.
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forensic auditing and accounting - forensic accounting with richard ...

forensic auditing and accounting - forensic accounting with richard ... | Forensic Accounting-Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
The History of Forensic AccountingForensic accounting can be traced back as far as 1817 to Meyer v. Sefton, a Canadian case that allowed an ‘expert witness’ to testify in court. The term ‘forensic accounting’ was first published in an article in 1946 "Forensic Accounting- Its Place in Today’s Economy" authored by Maurice E. Peloubet, a partner in Price Waterhouse. He stated that, "during the war both the public and industrial accountant have been engaged in the practice of forensic accounting." Interest in forensic accounting spread through the United States and England early in the twentieth century. One of the first institutions to use the services of Forensic Accountants was the Inland Revenue Service to control tax evasion. The FBI used forensic accountants and employed nearly 500 such agents during World War II. As a profession, forensic accounting continued to grow during the latter half of the century, as the Generally Accepted Accounting Practice and tax laws became widespread and mandatory.

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Allison Eades's comment, February 20, 2014 10:40 PM
Forensic accounting has been a fast growing profession, especially with the prevention of white collar crimes globally. Forensic accounting was originally referred to as investigative accounting, but in recent years it has began to form a whole knew category of accounting. Rather than looking at the numbers for what they are, financial accountants look behind all of the numbers in order to find out where they came from, and where they are going. (Paraphrase 9)
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Forensic Accountants Follow the Money

Forensic Accountants Follow the Money | Forensic Accounting-Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
Forensic accountants help conduct the financial investigative portion of complex cases.
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Allison Eades's comment, February 13, 2014 9:01 AM
Forensic accountants employed through the FBI are located in all of the FBI field offices. Depending on the size of the office, some could have more accountant teams made up of forensic accountants, and financial analysts. Some smaller offices would only have a few employed financial accountants. The FBI also has a "Forensic Accountant Support Team" which is known as the SWAT team for the accountants. This group works out of the FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C. This team of accountants responds quickly to large investigations that could be happening anywhere in the United States, that involve a significant amount of financial data and information. (Paraphrase 3)
Allison Eades's comment, February 17, 2014 8:50 AM
Responsibilities of FBI: 1. Investigating businesses and personal records through the use of financial analysis techniques and developing unique financial profiles for those who have participated in illegal or even suspicious actions. 2. Have the ability to collect information and evidence in different cases along with completing search warrants that will give them permission to complete their financial analysis of the criminal activity. 3. Sit in on interviews with other FBI case agents. 4. Tracing financial activity in transactions and sources related to the crime or investigation. 5. Composing a document stating what was found during the investigation and meeting with the appropriate attorneys to discuss further action and testifying techniques. (Paraphrase 4)
Allison Eades's comment, February 17, 2014 8:55 AM
After September 11, there became a significant amount of corporate frauds and many other financial crimes taking place in the United States. With that being said, the United States had to take action through introducing the necessary skills and resources in order to solve these serious problems. Another important aspect of the solution was introduced to the public in 2009, and this would be the creation of what is now commonly recognized as a forensic accountant. (Paraphrase 5)
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How Does Using a Forensic Accountant Assist an Attorney with Litigation?

Forensic accountants can be invaluable when reaching settlement in a case -- but how? I think the greatest use for a forensic accountant would be to uncover ...
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Career Path - Forensic Accountant

Career Path - Forensic Accountant | Forensic Accounting-Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
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Allison Eades's comment, February 20, 2014 10:32 PM
(Continue the first reaction) ... public accounting firms as members of the forensic accounting departments. Working for these company's includes meeting with firms that specialize in forensic accounting services. It can also include working closely with insurance agencies, government groups or members of the law enforcement community. (Paraphrase 6)
Allison Eades's comment, February 20, 2014 10:36 PM
While the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners conducted a worldwide salary study, it was found that they make 22% more than those accountants who haven't been certified. This study also supplied very important information to anti-fraud professionals in keeping track of their growing salaries and careers. Becoming a CFE really benefit an accountant in their career. (Paraphrase 8)
Allison Eades's comment, February 20, 2014 10:46 PM
Job Responsibilities: Before entering the forensic accounting field, it is necessary for the accountant to have three years in a typical accounting environment before becoming a financial accountant. Some responsibilities include performing research in order to trace funds, analyzing financial data, preparing reports based on the findings, and testifying in court when necessary. (Paraphrase 10)