Accelerating technology
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Accelerating technology
Exponential technology is the central driver of global innovations to make a better world
Curated by Paul Epping
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Aim: Systems, Outcomes and the Future of Healthcare Service Delivery - Artefact

Aim: Systems, Outcomes and the Future of Healthcare Service Delivery - Artefact | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Aim (artificial intelligence medicine) is a concept of a healthcare service delivery platform that sets the foundation for positive health outcomes.
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Healthcare on demand... Why visiting a physician for basic tests? Results are immediately leading to a potential diagnosis and soon will be a accurate diagnisis

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Calming Virtual Reality Scenarios Prove More Effective at Reducing Pain |

Calming Virtual Reality Scenarios Prove More Effective at Reducing Pain | | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Virtual reality technology has been used in the past to help reduce the pain experienced during difficult to endure procedures, such as the SnowWorld game
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the power of VR to reduce pain seems to work

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VR glove powered by soft robotics provides missing sense of touch | KurzweilAI

Prototype of haptic VR glove, using soft robotic “muscles” to provide realistic tactile feedback for VR experiences (credit: Jacobs School of
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Virtual sense is getting closer

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New nuclear magnetic resonance technique offers ‘molecular window’ for live disease diagnosis | KurzweilAI

New nuclear magnetic resonance technique offers ‘molecular window’ for live disease diagnosis | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
New nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system for molecular diagnosis (credit: University of Toronto Scarborough) University of Toronto Scarborough
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Breaking through technology for disease diagnosis. NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) can be combined with the MRI machines

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Deep learning-based bionic hand grasps objects automatically | KurzweilAI

Deep learning-based bionic hand grasps objects automatically | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
British biomedical engineers have developed a new generation of intelligent prosthetic limbs that allows the wearer to reach for objects automatically,
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Quadriplegia patient uses brain-computer interface to move his arm by just thinking | KurzweilAI

Quadriplegia patient uses brain-computer interface to move his arm by just thinking | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Bill Kochevar, who was paralyzed below his shoulders in a bicycling accident eight years ago, is the first person with quadriplegia to have arm and hand
Paul Epping's insight:

Amazing achievements. If this can be done to move your arms... what about the legs (assuming that the spinal cord has not been damaged)

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New artificial photosynthesis process converts CO2 in air to fuel | KurzweilAI

New artificial photosynthesis process converts CO2 in air to fuel | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Professor Fernando Uribe-Romo and his team of students created a way to use LED light and a porous synthetic metal-organic frameworks (MOF) material to break
Paul Epping's insight:

This is an amazing solutions. We're in the mids of selecting the winner for the global impact competition "climate change" and we have seen great ideas. We are really making progress in solving this problem. Using exponential technologies is really promising...   

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Solar-powered device turns air into drinkable water

Solar-powered device turns air into drinkable water | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Solar-powered device turns air into drinkable water
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This can solve a lot of problems....

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This Is the Dawn of Brain Tech, But How Far Can It Go?

This Is the Dawn of Brain Tech, But How Far Can It Go? | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
This Is the Dawn of Brain Tech, But How Far Can It Go?
By Raya Bidshahri - Apr 11, 20174,073
148
What distinguishes Elon Musk’s reputation as an entrepreneur is that any venture he takes on comes from a bold and inspiring vision for the future of our species. Not long ago, Musk announced a new company, Neuralink, with the goal of merging the human mind with AI. Given Musk’s track record of accomplishing the seemingly impossible, the world is bound to pay extra attention when he says he wants to connect our brains to computers.

Neuralink is registered as a medical company in California. With further details yet to be announced, it will attempt to create a “neural lace,” which is a brain-machine interface that can be implanted directly into our brains to monitor and enhance them.

In the short run, this technology has medical applications and may be used to treat paralysis or diseases like Parkinson’s. In the coming decades, it could allow us to exponentially boost our mental abilities or even digitize human consciousness. Fundamentally, it is a step towards the convergence of humans and machines and maybe a leap in human progress—one that could address various challenges we face.

Current state of research

Musk isn’t the first or only person who wants to connect brains to machines. Another tech entrepreneur, Bryan Johnson, founded startup Kernel in 2016 to similarly look into brain-machine interfaces, and the scientific community has been making strides in recent years.

Earlier this month, researchers in Switzerland announced paralyzed primates could walk again with the assistance of a neuroprosthetic system. And CNN reported a man paralyzed from the shoulders down regained use of his right hand with a brain-machine interface.

The past few years have seen remarkable developments in both the hardware and software of brain-machine interfaces. Experts are designing more intricate electrodes while programming better algorithms to interpret the neural signals. Scientists have already succeeded in enabling paralyzed patients to type with their minds, and are even allowing brains to communicate with one another purely through brainwaves. So far, most of these successful applications have been in enabling motor control or very basic communication in individuals with brain injuries.

There remain, however, many challenges to ongoing developments of BMIs.

For one, the most powerful and precise BMIs require invasive surgery. Another challenge is implementing robust algorithms that can interpret the complex interactions of the brain’s 86 billion neurons. Most progress has also been one-directional: brain to machine. We have yet to develop BMIs that can provide us with sensory information or allow us to feel the subjective experience of tactile sensations such as touch, temperature or pain. (Although there has been progress giving prosthetics-users a sense of touch via electrodes attached to nerves in their arm.)

There is also the general challenge that our understanding of the brain is in its infancy. We have a long way to go before we fully understand how and where various functions such as cognition, perception and self-awareness arise. To enhance or integrate machines with these functions, we need to understand their physical underpinnings. Designing interfaces that can communicate with individual neurons and safely integrate with existing biological networks requires a great amount of medical innovation.

However, it’s important to remember this technology is rapidly advancing.

The rise of cyborgs

Hollywood often depicts a dystopian future where machines and humans go to war. Instead, however, we are seeing hints of a future where human and machine converge.

In many ways, we are already cyborgs.

Futurists like Jason Silva point out that our devices are an abstract form of brain-machine interface. We use smartphones to store and retrieve information, perform calculations and communicate with each other. According to philosophers Andy Clark and David Chalmers’ theory of the extended mind, we use technology to expand the boundaries of the human mind beyond our skulls. We use tools like machine learning to enhance our cognitive skills or powerful telescopes to enhance our visual reach. Technology has become a part of our exoskeleton, allowing us to push beyond our limitations.

Musk has pointed out that the merger of biological and machine intelligence may also be necessary if we are to remain “economically valuable.” Brain-machine interfaces could allow us to better reap the benefits of advancing artificial intelligence. With increasing automation of jobs, this could be a way to keep up with machines that perform tasks far more efficiently than we can.

Technologist Ray Kurzweil believes that by 2030s we will connect the neocortex of our brains to the cloud via nanobots. He points out that the neocortex is the source of all “beauty, love and creativity and intelligence in the world.” Notably, due to his predictive accuracy, Kurzweil has been referred to by Bill Gates and others as the best predictor of future technologies.

Whether Kurzweil is right or things take longer than expected, our current trajectory suggests we’ll get there eventually. What might such a future look like when it arrives?

We could scale our intelligence and imagination a thousand-fold. It would radically disrupt how we think, feel and communicate. Transferring our thoughts and feelings directly to others’ brains could re-define human sociality and intimacy. Ultimately, uploading our entire selves into machines could allow us to transcend our biological skins and become digitally immortal.

The implications are truly profound, and many questions remain unanswered. What will the subjective experience of human consciousness feel like when our minds are digitized? How will we prevent our digital brains from getting hacked and overwritten with unwanted thoughts? How do we ensure access to brain-machine interfaces for all, not just the wealthy?

As Peter Diamandis says, “If this future becomes reality, connected humans are going to change everything. We need to discuss the implications in order to make the right decisions now so that we are prepared for the future.”
Paul Epping's insight:

Big changes are going to happen and we need to address the ethical aspects of these changes. It should be priority #1 and not focusing on what technologically is possible 

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This contact lens could someday measure blood glucose and other signs of disease | KurzweilAI

This contact lens could someday measure blood glucose and other signs of disease | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Transparent biosensors in contact lenses (made visible in this artist's rendition) could soon help track our health. (credit: Jack Forkey/Oregon State
Paul Epping's insight:

Connect the results to your other personal data and send it to an online diagnosis tool and that will cut out a lot of costs and time, probably with a better quality. Then you can see your doc with a more complete story  

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Musk launches company to pursue ‘neural lace’ brain-interface technology | KurzweilAI

Musk launches company to pursue ‘neural lace’ brain-interface technology | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
image credit | Bloomberg Elon Musk has launched a California-based company called Neuralink Corp., The Wall Street Journal reported today (Monday, March 27,
Paul Epping's insight:

Shouldn't we address here some ethical considerations? Who "owns' this e.g. what is in the lead? Do we want to be cyborgs? And if we don't what will be the consequences? Just to mention a couple.

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Software detects early-stage cancer DNA using epigenetic markers | FierceBiotech

Software detects early-stage cancer DNA using epigenetic markers | FierceBiotech | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
It’s long been known that tumors cast tiny bits of DNA into the bloodstream, and many efforts are underway to translate that knowledge into new technologies for early detection. But one major challenge will be figuring out where in the body the cancer is hiding. Now researchers at the University of California in Los Angeles believe they’ve hit upon a way to do just that with a simple blood test.
Paul Epping's insight:

New way of discovering early stage cancer. A furhter step to ban this disease

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Datasets may allow for 3D visualizations of pancreas to improve diabetes research

Datasets may allow for 3D visualizations of pancreas to improve diabetes research | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Researchers from Umea University in Sweden have developed datasets capable of mapping the 3D transfer and volume of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. The development of such technology could improve visual and quantitative information to be used as reference content for future diabetes research.
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Designing Antiviral Proteins via Computer Could Help Halt the Next Pandemic

Designing Antiviral Proteins via Computer Could Help Halt the Next Pandemic | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
As Bill Gates sees it, there are three main threats to our species: nuclear war, climate change, and the next global pandemic. Speaking on pandemic preparedness at the Munich Security Conference earlier this year, Gates reminded us that “the fact that a deadly global pandemic has not occurred in recent history shouldn’t be mistaken for …
Paul Epping's insight:

I think that Bill Gates should have mentioned Cyber Crime as a threat as well. However, definitely, a next pandemic could also be disastrou.

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33 blood-cancer patients have dramatic clinical remission with new T-cell therapy | KurzweilAI

Image of a group of killer T cells (green and red) surrounding a cancer cell (blue, center)  (credit: NIH) Chinese doctors have reported success with a new
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Result of reprogramming T-cells...

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Apple CEO Tim Cook test-drove a device that tracks his blood sugar, hinting at Apple's interest

Apple CEO Tim Cook test-drove a device that tracks his blood sugar, hinting at Apple's interest | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Tim Cook has been spotted at the Apple campus test driving a glucometer connected to his Apple Watch.
Paul Epping's insight:

More and more types of diagnostic components are converging to one device. 

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Elon Musk’s Los Angeles tunnel-boring machine plan revealed | KurzweilAI

Elon Musk’s Los Angeles tunnel-boring machine plan revealed | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Musk's plan for tunnels under Los Angeles (credit: The Boring Company) Things happen fast with Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla Motors and CEO/CTO of SpaceX. It
Paul Epping's insight:

The one after the other craze idea, but seems to work. Amazing the speed in which he makes decisions and also has working solutions.

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Precision typing on a smartwatch with finger gestures | KurzweilAI

Precision typing on a smartwatch with finger gestures | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
The Watchsense prototype uses a small depth camera attached to the arm, mimicking a depth camera on a smartwatch. It could make it easy to type, or in a
Paul Epping's insight:

Really interesting feature....

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In a neurotechnology future, human-rights laws will need to be revisited | KurzweilAI

In a neurotechnology future, human-rights laws will need to be revisited | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
New forms of brainwashing include transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to neuromodulate the brain regions responsible for social prejudice and political and
Paul Epping's insight:

We need social entrepreneurs next to technical entrepreneurs. Impact of technology on humanity should always be included in the (preparation) of new technology 

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Self-taught artificial intelligence beats doctors at predicting heart attacks

Self-taught artificial intelligence beats doctors at predicting heart attacks | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
New method could save thousands of lives a year
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Accuracy is increasing. Are we also working on a more holistic view? 

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IBM Leverages Blockchain for a Low-Carbon Future

IBM Leverages Blockchain for a Low-Carbon Future | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
IBM Press Room - IBM today announced the world’s first blockchain-based green asset management platform based on the open source, openly governed Hyperledger Fabric.
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Neural probes for the spinal cord | KurzweilAI

Neural probes for the spinal cord | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a rubber-like fiber, shown here, that can flex and stretch while simultaneously delivering both optical impulses for optoelectronic
Paul Epping's insight:

On the way to replacing damaged spine cords some day?

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Mayo Clinic discovers high-intensity aerobic training can reverse aging | KurzweilAI

Mayo Clinic discovers high-intensity aerobic training can reverse aging | KurzweilAI | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Mayo Clinic study finds high-intensity aerobic exercise may reverse aging (credit: Flickr user Global Panorama via Creative Commons license) A Mayo Clinic
Paul Epping's insight:

This is what I persononally do for > 40 years.... Result? Still running every day at least 10km (<50 minutes....!) without any problems (62y old) Mayo "discovered" something that people like already know for a long time. Except a little surgery... NEVER ill! (so far... ;-) )

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Intensive Treatment Shows Potential Against Type 2 Diabetes: MedlinePlus Health News

Intensive Treatment Shows Potential Against Type 2 Diabetes: MedlinePlus Health News | Accelerating technology | Scoop.it
Up to 40 percent experienced temporary remission, small study finds
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On the way to reverse daiabetes type 2

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