Academic Honesty in Higher Ed
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Online exam proctoring catches cheaters, raises concerns | Inside Higher Ed

Online exam proctoring catches cheaters, raises concerns | Inside Higher Ed | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Many administrators and faculty members say online exam proctoring works and is vital to expanding online programs. But some question, at what cost? 
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Study finds paraphrased language fools plagiarism-detection software

Study finds paraphrased language fools plagiarism-detection software | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Paraphrasing tools, freely available online, can fool plagiarism detection software, study finds.
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Now a degree is a commodity, no wonder more students are cheating | Poppy Noor

Now a degree is a commodity, no wonder more students are cheating | Poppy Noor | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it

It was reported this week that the Department for Education is considering new penalties for students who plagiarise essays. This comes after an investigation by the Times in 2016 found that 50,000 students had been caught cheating on their university degrees in the three years before.

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Robert Ubell on online cheating and what colleges can do about it | Inside Higher Ed

Robert Ubell on online cheating and what colleges can do about it | Inside Higher Ed | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Spooked by horror stories of an online cheating plague, how should university faculty members and administrators respond?
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How professors can better fight cheating

How professors can better fight cheating | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Can profs eliminate cheating? No. But honest students want us to go after it, and there seems to be no lesson larger than teaching students to protect their integrity and ours.
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6 Ways to Prevent Plagiarism in Student Papers

6 Ways to Prevent Plagiarism in Student Papers | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Plagiarism is one of the plagues that have tormented teachers since the first school was opened. The motivation or cause behind it can be many: procrastination, lack of research skills, or even an attempt to sound smarter. But the consequence is always the same, copying some else’s words and signing them as if they were yours. And it can be from a book, a paper, or from another student.
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The top 5 craziest online cheating incidents - eCampus News

The top 5 craziest online cheating incidents - eCampus News | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
In anticipation of upcoming college finals, Examity unveiled the most outrageous and prevalent examples of students caught cheating during an online proctored exam.
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Why students really cheat | EAB Daily Briefing

Why students really cheat | EAB Daily Briefing | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Simple economic incentives encourage students to cheat, so the practice is unlikely to abate anytime soon without a major system overhaul, Carol Poster writes for Inside Higher Ed. 

Students have many options available to them when it comes to cheating that save time and are cost-effective. For example, Poster says, suppose a student must choose between spending 20 hours to write a term paper or working. He can earn $180 for 20 hours of work at his job and buy a term paper online for $80, meaning he has $100 left over that he wouldn't have earned if he had written the paper himself.
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Online learning presents new opportunities for cheating

Online learning presents new opportunities for cheating | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
One could equate speeding to cheating on several levels: It is clearly something that you are not supposed to do, yet some still will do it.

Those who do try to avoid any and all enforcement. There are regulations in place to prevent us from doing so, and yet, everyone was 16 once.
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Skills and Strategies | Understanding Plagiarism in a Digital Age

Skills and Strategies | Understanding Plagiarism in a Digital Age | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
o your students have a hard time defining — and thus, perhaps, avoiding — plagiarism?

They’re not alone. In a cut-and-paste world, examples of both intentional and unintentional plagiarism are everywhere.
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Do Online Students Cheat More on Tests?

Do Online Students Cheat More on Tests? | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Those who teach online are less likely to report discernible differences in cheating between online and face-to-face courses. But what did researchers find?
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Turnitin faces new questions about efficacy of plagiarism detection software | InsideHigherEd

Turnitin faces new questions about efficacy of plagiarism detection software | InsideHigherEd | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Plagiarism detection software from vendors such as Turnitin is often criticized for labeling clumsy student writing as plagiarism. Now a set of new tests suggests the software lets too many students get away with it.
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Addressing Academic Dishonesty in the Age of Ubiquitous Technology (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Addressing Academic Dishonesty in the Age of Ubiquitous Technology (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Key Takeaways
Technology can help fight cheating that is itself based on technology, especially with tweaking of assignments and assessments in a way that makes it difficult to cheat.
Students should be made aware of resources such as university writing centers and tools such as Endnote.
Training about copyright, plagiarism, and time management can help students succeed without feeling that they have to cut corners.
Relevant codes and policies should be clearly stated in communications such as orientation materials, student handbooks, and course syllabi to establish expectations and reduce confrontations between instructors and students.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 9, 2015 2:52 PM

This Educause review is on point.  Solid common sense advice.

Steve Vaitl's curator insight, June 20, 2015 11:57 AM

For my teaching friends or anyone considering doing writing at a post academic level. What a great resource for information on cutting down the rate of plagiarism. Much of what I see is not intentional but that makes little difference to a protective author, or the legal system.

Glad to see at Kansas City Kansas Community College we are already instituting most of these policies and practices.

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A student climbed through the ceiling to steal an exam. Then the professor showed up.

A student climbed through the ceiling to steal an exam. Then the professor showed up. | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Last week at the University of Kentucky, two students' cheating plan proved to have a high margin of error.
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Why students really cheat

Why students really cheat | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Simple economic incentives encourage students to cheat, so the practice is unlikely to abate anytime soon without a major system overhaul, Carol Poster writes for Inside Higher Ed. 

Students have many options available to them when it comes to cheating that save time and are cost-effective. For example, Poster says, suppose a student must choose between spending 20 hours to write a term paper or working. He can earn $180 for 20 hours of work at his job and buy a term paper online for $80, meaning he has $100 left over that he wouldn't have earned if he had written the paper himself.
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University students could be fined or handed criminal records for plagiarised essays, new proposals suggest

University students could be fined or handed criminal records for plagiarised essays, new proposals suggest | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
For the first time, students caught cheating could be criminalised amid fears that a burgeoning “essay mills” industry is threatening the quality of a British university degree.
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Why students really cheat

Why students really cheat | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Simple economic incentives encourage students to cheat, so the practice is unlikely to abate anytime soon without a major system overhaul, Carol Poster writes for Inside Higher Ed. 
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Study finds few students cheat the system with digital homework questions

Study finds few students cheat the system with digital homework questions | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Even if they could cheat without being penalized, most students will take an honest stab at homework questions, study finds.
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When Plagiarism Is a Plea for Help

When Plagiarism Is a Plea for Help | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Instead of failing students for intellectual dishonesty, shouldn’t we try to help them not fail?
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When Plagiarism Is a Plea for Help

When Plagiarism Is a Plea for Help | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Instead of failing students for intellectual dishonesty, shouldn’t we try to help them not fail?
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​Researchers Find No Evidence of ‘Community College Penalty’ - Admitted Blog

​Researchers Find No Evidence of ‘Community College Penalty’ - Admitted Blog | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Students who kick off their college career at a two-year institution are just as likely to earn bachelor’s degrees as those who begin their studies at four-year schools, according to a recent study published in The Review of Higher Education.
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Promoting Academic Integrity in Online Education: Special Report


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 9, 2015 2:48 PM

Face to Face or online, academic integrity remains an issue in education. This report takes a deep look at online issues.

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A Side Effect of Online Courses: Online Cheating

A Side Effect of Online Courses: Online Cheating | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
The growth in courses available on the web has led to a growth in paid services that will impersonate students and do their work for them.
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10 Types of Plagiarism - Handout

10 Types of Plagiarism - Handout | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
The "Plagiarism Spectrum" identifies 10 types of plagiarism based on findings from a worldwide survey of nearly 900 secondary and higher education instructors.
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Cheating with essay mills: an extension of students asking each other for help?

Cheating with essay mills: an extension of students asking each other for help? | Academic Honesty in Higher Ed | Scoop.it
Universities seem relatively blind to this “contract cheating” in which students pay somebody else to do their assignment, but the scale of the business is sobering.
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