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Drinking water from the sea: Electrochemically mediated seawater desalination in microfluidic systems

Drinking water from the sea: Electrochemically mediated seawater desalination in microfluidic systems | Abundance | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —A new method for the desalination of sea water has been reported by a team of American and German researchers in the journal Angewandte Chemie. In contrast to conventional methods, this technique consumes little energy and is very simple.
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Post-scarcity economy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Post-scarcity (also styled postscarcity) is a hypothetical form of economy or society in which goods, services and information are free,[1] or practically free. This would require an abundance of fundamental resources (matter, energy and intelligence), in conjunction with sophisticated automated systems capable of converting raw materials into finished goods.

Scarcity is the fundamental economic problem of having seemingly unlimited human needs and wants, in a world of limited resources. It states that society has insufficient productive resources to fulfill all human wants and needs. Alternatively, scarcity implies that not all of society's goals can be pursued at the same time; trade-offs are made of one good against others. As such, the term post-scarcity economics may be somewhat paradoxical. To quote a 1932 essay by Lionel Robbins, economics is "the science which studies human behaviour as a relationship between ends and scarce means which have alternative uses."[2]

Economics in any and all forms rests on the assumption of conditions of natural or artificially enforced scarcity, far less than enough to supply everyone. The study of economics and its everyday business control and transactions tells you how each variation of the Price System makes an ideology of how to divide up that scarcity. You will find economics defined in terms of scarcity in every textbook on the subject, usually in the opening chapter. Without scarcity, some of them candidly admit, there would be no need for economics.

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Anti-Star Trek: A Theory of Posterity

In the process of trying to pull together some thoughts on intellectual property, zero marginal-cost goods, immaterial labor, and the incipient transition to a rentier form of capitalism, I've been...
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Robots taking Human Jobs may Require a New Kind of Capitalism

Robots taking Human Jobs may Require a New Kind of Capitalism | Abundance | Scoop.it
Are humans becoming obsolete in the workforce? Many experts believe the answer is yes.
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Peter Diamandis: Rocket Man - Forbes

Peter Diamandis: Rocket Man - Forbes | Abundance | Scoop.it
VideoPeter Diamandis’ $10 million X Prize bounty sparked a boom in commercial space tourism.  You won’t believe what he wants to do next. This article appears in the Feb. 13 edition of FORBES magazine.
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The World We Dream- Peter Diamandis Zeitgeist Americas 2012

The World We Dream- Peter Diamandis Zeitgeist Americas 2012 | Abundance | Scoop.it
The World We Dream-- Peter Diamandis, Chairman & CEO, X Prize Foundation. Putting a man on the moon was once simply a dream. What are some of today's most in...
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Essentient: Area the size of R.I. could supply Earth's protein needs using 'nutriculture' - Boston Business Journal

Essentient: Area the size of R.I. could supply Earth's protein needs using 'nutriculture' - Boston Business Journal | Abundance | Scoop.it
Cambridge startup Essentient continues to quietly make progress on its nutriculture...
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Switzerland: An Initiative to Establish Basic Income for All · Global Voices

Switzerland: An Initiative to Establish Basic Income for All · Global Voices | Abundance | Scoop.it
An initiative to establish a new federal law that would give a basic monthly income to all citizens, regardless of employment status was formally introduced in Switzerland in April. Stanislas Jourdan looks into the details of the initiative.
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Cockaigne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cockaigne or Cockayne (pron.: /kɒˈkn/) is a medieval mythical land of plenty, an imaginary place of extreme luxury and ease where physical comforts and pleasures are always immediately at hand and where the harshness of medieval peasant life does not exist. Specifically, in poems like The Land of Cockaigne, Cockaigne is a land of contraries, where all the restrictions of society are defied (abbots beaten by their monks), sexual liberty is open (nuns flipped over to show their bottoms), and food is plentiful (skies that rain cheeses). Writing about Cockaigne was a commonplace of Goliard verse. It represented both wish fulfillment and resentment at the strictures of asceticism and dearth.

While the first recorded use of the name are the Latin "Cucaniensis", and the Middle English "Cokaygne", or modern-day "Cuckoo-land", one line of reasoning has the name tracing to Middle French (pays de) cocaigne[1] "(land of) plenty," ultimately adapted or derived from a word for a small sweet cake sold to children at a fair (OED). In Italian, the same place is called "Paese della Cuccagna"; the Dutch equivalent is Luilekkerland ("lazy luscious land"), and the German equivalent is Schlaraffenland (also known as "land of milk and honey"). In Spain an equivalent place is named Jauja, after a rich mining region of the Andes, and País de Cucaña ("fools' paradise") may also signify such a place. From Swedish dialect lubber (fat lazy fellow) comes Lubberland,[2] popularized in the ballad An Invitation to Lubberland.

In the 1820s, the name Cockaigne came to be applied jocularly to London,[3] as the land of Cockneys,[4] and thus "Cockaigne", though the two are not linguistically connected otherwise. The composer Edward Elgar used the title "Cockaigne" for his concert overture and suite evoking the people of London, Cockaigne (In London Town) (1901).

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What Would a Utopian 15 Hour Work Week Really Look Like? - Forbes

What Would a Utopian 15 Hour Work Week Really Look Like? - Forbes | Abundance | Scoop.it
John Quiggin has a fascinating essay on the prospect of 15 hour work weeks in aeon magazine. One path he sees to this is a guaranteed minimum income for everyone.
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Weighing Apps for an On-Demand Economy

Weighing Apps for an On-Demand Economy | Abundance | Scoop.it
New smartphone apps can summon an army of personal assistants to help with daily tasks. But this new on-demand economy is making one user a bit uncomfortable.
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ZEITGEIST: MOVING FORWARD | OFFICIAL RELEASE | 2011

Please support Peter Joseph's new, upcoming free film project: "InterReflections": http://www.interreflectionsmovie.com/help.html Sign up for TZM Mailing Lis...
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